GA PRGTEConf08Rawding

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Shopping : some options from an expert. Charles Rawding: Edge Hill University

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Source: D.Waugh & T.Bushell: Foundations (new edition). Stanley Thornes. (1996) p58 Traditional approaches to shopping Extract from book removed for copyright reasons. Extract illustrated corner shops, shopping streets, shopping malls and out of town shopping centres.

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Changing components of the retail price index Source: Adapted from O’Donoghue et al: 2006.

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Geographies of consumption Shopping: some alternative approaches As consumer practice embedded in modernity Shopping in ‘new’ locations The changing nature of retail locations The changing nature of retail operations

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Shopping in ‘new’ locations Out of town shopping centres

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Retail parks Shopping in ‘new’ locations

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Shopping in ‘new’ locations ‘Village’ shopping – Hornsea Freeport

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Shopping in ‘new’ locations One-stop shopping

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Shopping in ‘new’ locations Niche locations

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Shopping in ‘new’ locations Shopping and travel

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Shopping in ‘new’ locations Shopping online

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The changing nature of retail locations Source: C.Rawding: Reading our landscapes. Chris Kington, Cambridge, 2007. p69

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The changing nature of retail locations

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The changing nature of retail locations

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The changing nature of retail locations

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Landscapes of globalisation and standardisation

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The changing nature of retail locations

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The changing nature of retail locations ‘leisure’

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The changing nature of retail locations ‘retail’

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The global geographies of leading trans-national food retailers. Source: P.Dicken (2006) Global shift. 5th Ed. Sage: London, p37

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Tesco, Krakow, Poland

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Borsch packet soup and goulash ready-meals are the new battleground for British retailers and manufacturers as they meet the demand for home-grown comfort food from the country's burgeoning Polish community. An estimated 750,000 Poles - 2 per cent of the total Polish population - now live in Britain and the market opportunity afforded by the Polish pound (actually the zloty) is not going unnoticed. Nestle is going head to head with its arch-rival Heinz by bringing Winiary, its Knorr-style Polish food brand, to the UK. The brand is a household name in Poland, generating sales of around £100m and Nestle is to launch the bestselling product lines, including the white and red borsch-flavoured packet soup, stock cubes and favourite pudding, kisiel o smaku truskawkowym, a soft strawberry jelly. The move is backed by a campaign in Dziennik Polski, the daily Polish language paper which has a UK circulation of around 30,000. (Observer 24th June 2007) ‘Food giants cash in on a taste of Poland’ Images of Polish food packets removed for copyright reasons

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The Blue Jeans Story. Source: McPartland in Balderstone (2006) p171

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Wall displays of pupil work

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Retail geographies:where next ?

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