Social Networking Report

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CA/NCSA Social Networking Study Report S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 6 Prepared by:

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www. russellresearch.com Table of Contents Table of Contents Introduction and Methodology………………………………………………………….. 2 Executive Summary……….......................………………………………………………….. 4 Detailed Findings Social Networking Behavior……………………………………………………………………….. 5 Personal Information………………………………………………………………………………. 12 Downloading Files…………………………………………………………………………………. 22 Unsolicited Emails…………………………………………………………………………………. 25 Cyber-Crime………………………………………………………………………………………... 29 Social Networking Children………………………………………………………………………. 32 Demographics……………………………………………………………………………………… 38 Appendix – Security……………………………………………………………………………… 40

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www. russellresearch.com Introduction and Methodology Methodology Interviewing for this study was conducted as part of the weekly online Russell Omnibus and ran for two consecutive weeks. The first round of interviewing was conducted August 25-28, 2006 among 1,065 adults and the second was conducted September 5-7, 2006 among 1,098 adults for a total of 2,163 adults across the United States. Figures for gender, age, and geography were weighted where necessary to match their actual proportions in the population. In theory, with probability samples of this size, one could say with 95 percent certainty that the results have a statistical precision of plus or minus 2.1 percentage points of what they would be if the entire adult population had been polled with complete accuracy. Unfortunately, there are several other possible sources of error in all polls or surveys that are probably more serious than theoretical calculations of sampling error. They include refusals to be interviewed (non-response), question wording and question order, and weighting. It is impossible to quantify the errors that may result from these factors. This online survey is not a probability sample. These statements conform to the principles of disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls. Sample Online sample for the study was drawn from Survey Sampling International’s SurveySpot online consumer panel. Survey Sampling is recognized as the premier sample provider in the market research industry. The SurveySpot panel currently has 1.6 million panel members who are recruited using a wide variety of online and offline methods, including website registrations, email invitations and telephone recruiting. For this study, invitations were e-mailed to potential respondents targeted by gender, age, census region and ethnicity.

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www. russellresearch.com Introduction and Methodology Statistical Notation The statistical significance of a result in this survey is the probability that the observed relationship (e.g., between variables) or a difference (e.g., between means) in a sample occurred by pure chance, and that in the population from which the sample was drawn, no such relationship or differences exist. Using less technical terms, one could say that the statistical significance of a result tells us something about the degree to which the result is 'true'. More technically, the value of the p-value represents a decreasing index of the reliability of a result. The higher the p-value, the less we can believe that the observed relation between variables in the sample is a reliable indicator of the relation between the respective variables in the population. Specifically, the p-value represents the probability of error that is involved in accepting our observed result as valid, that is, as 'representative of the population.' For example, a p-value of .05 (i.e.,1/20) indicates that there is a 5% probability that the relation between the variables found in our sample is a 'fluke.' The following statistical notation is used throughout the report: = Indicates figure is significantly higher than the indicated sub-group at a 95% confidence level (i.e. p-value of .05 or less). The subgroups extend to gender (M=Males, F=Females); age (Y=Ages 38 to 34, M=Ages 35 to 54, O=Ages 55 or Older); region (M=Midwest, N=Northeast, S=South, W=West); household income (L=Under $50k, H=$50k or more); marital status (M=Married, NM=Not married); education (C=College educated, NC=Non-college educated); presence of children (C=Children present, NC=No children present); household size (O=Household size of 1; T=Household size of 2, B=Household size of 3 or more); employment status (E=Employed, NE=Not employed); worrying about victimization (W=Worry about victimization, D=Don’t worry about victimization).

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www. russellresearch.com Executive Summary Executive Summary Social networking services are the most popular meeting places on the Internet. More than 70 million people use social networking sites, and that number is increasing daily. Whether or not social networking services are the new 'Internet killer app' teenagers, young adults and older adults are increasingly using such services to connect with people who have common interests. In fact, nearly half (48 percent) of all adult Internet users surveyed spend time on social network Web sites and usage averages approximately two hours per week. While most think social networking services appeal only to teenagers, this statistic highlights adults are just as likely to use social networking services. Out of all those adults who indicated they use social networking services, 53 percent of them were over the age of 35. This study shows that social networking services are not simply used by underage, school kids, but in fact attract older adults as well. Over the past year, the physical dangers children face on social networking services has been well documented. However, this survey shows adults’ behaviors on social networking sites could increase their risk of becoming a victim of cyber crime or identity theft. For instance, 83 percent of adults who social network expose themselves to hackers and thieves by downloading unknown files potentially opening up their PCs to attacks. Moreover, 74 percent have given out some sort of personal information such as their email address, name and birthday. Some have even given out their social security number. Providing this type of information can provide enough ammunition for criminals to hack into financial records and compromise users’ personal information. More than 57 percent of adults who social network received unsolicited emails or phishy emails asking for money, requesting account information, informing users of lottery winnings or asking users to download a video or picture. Thirty-one percent of those who received these phishy emails actually responded to them. Responding to phishy emails dramatically increases the chances of receiving more unsolicited emails and providing personal or financial information that could be used to commit identity theft or fraud. Surprisingly, more than 40 percent of employed respondents with access to a computer at work claimed to visit these types of Web sites at work, opening up their businesses to the same cyber security risks. While only 20 percent of adults surveyed are aware their children under the age of 17 use social networking services, only 49 percent of those adults limit access to their children’s profile.

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Behavior Q.A1 How many hours do you spend on social networking sites a week? Consumers spend an average of two hours a week on social networking sites, with men and younger respondents significantly more likely to be involved on these sites. Men were significantly more likely to spend two to three hours on social networking sites a week, compared to women. Women, on the other hand, were significantly more likely to not be spending any time on social networking sites. The younger a respondent, the more hours they spent social networking. Amount Of Time Spent On Social Networking Sites Percent Indicated Time Base: Total Respondents

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Behavior Q.A1 How many hours do you spend on social networking sites a week? Respondents in the West were significantly more likely to spend three hours or less social networking than respondents in the Midwest or South. Respondents located in the West were significantly more likely to spend one to two hours on social networking sites compared to respondents located in the Midwest, Northeast and South. Those in households with incomes of $50k were significantly more likely to say they do not spend any time on social networking sites than lower income households. Amount Of Time Spent On Social Networking Sites Percent Indicated Time Base: Total Respondents

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Behavior Q.A1 How many hours do you spend on social networking sites a week? Non-married respondents were significantly more likely to spend time social networking. Households with children present were significantly more likely to spend more than three hours a week social networking. Households with three or more people residing in them spend significantly more time social networking compared to households with a two or one respondent. Amount Of Time Spent On Social Networking Sites Percent Indicated Time Base: Total Respondents

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Behavior Q.A1 How many hours do you spend on social networking sites a week? Respondents that were not employed spend significantly more time social networking than those who are employed. Respondents not worried about becoming victims of cyber-crime spend significantly more time social networking than those who are worried about becoming victims. Amount Of Time Spent On Social Networking Sites Percent Indicated Time Base: Total Respondents

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Behavior Over forty percent employed respondents claim to spend time on social networking sites while at work. Younger employees are the most likely to be visiting these sites sometimes during work. Men and women were equally likely to admit spending time on social networking sites during working hours. While at work, over one-half of the younger respondents (those 18 to 34 years old) admitted they social network at work. Amount Of Time Spent On Social Networking Sites At Work Percent Indicated Time Base: Total Employed, Have Computer Access At Work And Spend Time On Social Networking Sites Q.A2 Do you spend time on social networking sites while at work?

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Behavior Employees in the South and West were significantly more likely to social network while at work. Respondents in a household income bracket of Under $50k are the least likely to be social networking while at work ('never'). Amount Of Time Spent On Social Networking Sites At Work Percent Indicated Time Q.A2 Do you spend time on social networking sites while at work? Base: Total Employed, Have Computer Access At Work And Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Behavior Respondents not worried about becoming cyber-crime victims were significantly more likely to be social networking while on their employer’s dime. Amount Of Time Spent On Social Networking Sites At Work Percent Indicated Time Q.A2 Do you spend time on social networking sites while at work? Base: Total Employed, Have Computer Access At Work And Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Q.A3 Which of the following best describes how you limit/restrict who has access to your information? Women and older respondents are more cautious than others in terms of restricting access to their personal information. Women are significantly more likely than men to restrict information to their friends, while men are significantly more likely to allow anyone to read their profile. The older a respondent, the more likely they are to restrict information to their friends and also to say that they don’t know who to restrict access. How Limit Or Restrict Access To Personal Information Percent Indicated Limit/Restriction Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Married respondents are significantly more likely to restrict their information to friends than are unmarried respondents. Respondents worried about becoming cyber-crime victims are significantly more likely to restrict their information to friends and they are also more likely not to know how to restrict access to their personal profiles. How Limit Or Restrict Access To Personal Information Percent Indicated Limit/Restriction Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites Q.A3 Which of the following best describes how you limit/restrict who has access to your information?

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Q.A4 Which of the following have you posted publicly on your profile page? The majority of social network users have publicly posted information on their profile page, mainly their email address, name, and birth date. The younger, lower income users are the most likely to be publicly posting this information. Men tend to post their name, birth date, telephone number and work address more so than women. Younger respondents are significantly more likely to post their name and birth date on their profile page, while older respondents are significantly more likely to post their email, telephone number and home address. Information Posted Publicly On Profile Page Percent Indicated Information Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Q.A4 Which of the following have you posted publicly on your profile page? Respondents from the Midwest are much less likely to be posting personal information other than their email and name than respondents living in other parts of the country. Respondents from the West are the least likely to be posting their email address. Respondents in a household of $50k or more will not post their information as often as those in a household income of less than $50k. Information Posted Publicly On Profile Page Percent Indicated Information Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Q.A4 Which of the following have you posted publicly on your profile page? Unmarried respondents are significantly more likely to post their birth date than married respondents. Higher educated respondents will not post their email address or birth date as often as their counterparts. Information Posted Publicly On Profile Page Percent Indicated Information Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Q.A4 Which of the following have you posted publicly on your profile page? Respondents in a household size of one or two do not post their name publicly as often as those in a household size of three or more. Employed respondents are less likely to post their name, telephone number, home address and social security number than are the unemployed. Information Posted Publicly On Profile Page Percent Indicated Information Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Q.A4 Which of the following have you posted publicly on your profile page? Worried respondents (worried of becoming cyber-crime victims) will not post their name or birth date on a profile page as often as those worried about victimization. Information Posted Publicly On Profile Page Percent Indicated Information Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Q.A5 Are you aware that the information you put on your profile or web page may become widely available/publicly accessible? Most social networking site users claim to be aware that anyone can see their information on their profile or Web page. Women were significantly less aware than men that the information they post could become widely available or publicly accessible. Younger respondents, 18 to 34 years of age, were significantly more likely to say they were aware anyone could see their Web page. Aware Profile Could Become Publicly Accessible Percent Indicated Awareness Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Although few, respondents from the Midwest were more likely to say they thought only their friends could see their Web page. Respondent not married and without children were significantly more likely to know that their Web page could be publicly accessible. Aware Profile Could Become Publicly Accessible Percent Indicated Awareness Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites Q.A5 Are you aware that the information you put on your profile or web page may become widely available/publicly accessible?

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www. russellresearch.com Personal Information Employed respondents and those not worried about cyberspace victimization were significantly more likely to be aware that anyone could see their site. Aware Profile Could Become Publicly Accessible Percent Indicated Awareness Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites Q.A5 Are you aware that the information you put on your profile or web page may become widely available/publicly accessible?

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www. russellresearch.com Downloading Files Q.A7 Do you download files (music, movies, documents, artwork or podcasts) from other profiles or web pages? Over half of these social networking respondents download files from other profiles or Web pages at least sometimes, with men and those under age 35 the most likely to do so. Men are significantly more likely to say they download files all the time or sometimes compared to women. The younger the respondent, they more often they download files. Download Files From Other Profiles Or Web Pages Percent Indicated File Download Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Downloading Files Q.A7 Do you download files (music, movies, documents, artwork or podcasts) from other profiles or web pages? Respondents living in the West admit to downloading files all the time significantly more often than those living in the Midwest. Respondents not married tend to download files all of the time or sometimes significantly more often than married respondents. Download Files From Other Profiles Or Web Pages Percent Indicated File Download Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Downloading Files Q.A7 Do you download files (music, movies, documents, artwork or podcasts) from other profiles or web pages? Respondents that were employed are downloading files more often than those not employed, either all the time or sometimes. Respondents not worried about becoming cyber-crime victims download files from other profiles or Web pages significantly more often than other respondents. Download Files From Other Profiles Or Web Pages Percent Indicated File Download Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Unsolicited Emails Q.A8 Have you received any of the following on your social networking site in the past month? The majority of social network site users have received unsolicited emails during the past month, mainly ones informing them that they have won a prize. Men claimed to have received a significantly higher number of unsolicited emails asking them to check out a picture, song, video or document; promising them a service for money; asking for money; or asking them to update their social networking account information than did the women. The older a respondent the more likely they were to have received an unsolicited email announcing a prize. Users aged 35 to 54 were the most likely to have received an unsolicited email promising a service in exchange for money or asking them for money. Unsolicited Emails Percent Indicated Received Unsolicited Emails Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Unsolicited Emails Q.A8 Have you received any of the following on your social networking site in the past month? Midwestern located respondents were least likely to have received an unsolicited email promising a service in exchange for money or requesting them to update their account information. Respondents not worried about becoming cyberspace victims were the least likely to have received any unsolicited emails. Unsolicited Emails Percent Indicated Received Unsolicited Emails Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Unsolicited Emails Q.A9 And, have you responded to any of the following on your social networking site in the past month? Seven in ten social networking site users have not responded to the unsolicited emails. The youngest respondents were least likely to have responded to unsolicited emails. Responded To Unsolicited Emails Percent Indicated Responded Base: Total Received Unsolicited Emails

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www. russellresearch.com Unsolicited Emails Respondents living in a household of two, were most likely to have responded to an email informing them of winning a prize. Respondents not worried about becoming cyber-crime victims were more likely to have responded to an email requesting them to update their account information. Responded To Unsolicited Emails Percent Indicated Responded Q.A9 And, have you responded to any of the following on your social networking site in the past month? Base: Total Received Unsolicited Emails

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www. russellresearch.com Cyber-Crime Q.A10 Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statement. Four in ten of total respondents agreed strongly or somewhat that 'while they are on a social networking site, they don’t worry about becoming victims of cyber-crime.' The younger the user the most likely they were to agree strongly/somewhat with this statement. Agreement Level With 'While I am on a social networking site, I don’t worry about becoming a victim of cyber-crime' Percent Indicated Agreement Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Cyber-Crime Q.A10 Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statement. Southern respondents were significantly more likely to agree strongly that 'while they are on a social networking site, they don’t worry about becoming victims of cyber-crime,' than Midwestern respondents. Married respondents were significantly more likely to disagree strongly with this statement. Employed social networking site users were more likely to disagree somewhat that 'while they are on a social networking site, they don’t worry about becoming victims of cyber-crimes.' Agreement Level With 'While I am on a social networking site, I don’t worry about becoming a victim of cyber-crime' Percent Indicated Agreement Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Cyber-Crime Q.A10 Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statement. Respondents in a household size of three or more are the most likely to agree that 'while they are on a social networking site, they don’t worry about becoming victims of cyber-crime'. Agreement Level With 'While I am on a social networking site, I don’t worry about becoming a victim of cyber-crime' Percent Indicated Agreement Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Children Q.A11 Do any children in your household (under 17) participate on social networking sites, as defined above? Of the interviewed parents with children under 17, two in ten mentioned their child participates on social networking sites. Parents aged 55 or older were the most likely to say they did not know if their child under 17 participated in social networking sites. Children Under 17 Social Network Percent Indicated Responded Base: Total Have Children Under 17

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Children Unmarried respondents and those in households of two people were significantly more likely to admit that their child under 17 participated on social networking sites compared to the other respondents. Children Under 17 Social Network Percent Indicated Responded Base: Total Have Children Under 17 Q.A11 Do any children in your household (under 17) participate on social networking sites, as defined above?

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Children Q.A12 Which of the following do you do to monitor your child’s social networking site? Half of the parents with a child under 17 who participates in social networking sites mentioned that they regularly review their child’s profile. One third either don’t monitor their child’s site or don’t know how to. Higher educated parents apparently are less likely to review their child’s profile. Steps Taken To Monitor Child’s Social Networking Site Percent Indicated Steps Base: Total Have Children Under 17 That Participate In Social Networking

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Children Q.A13 Do you restrict who has access to your child’s social networking site? Half of the parents whose child is involved in social networking restrict access to their child’s site by only allowing friends to see their profile. The other half either don’t restrict access or don’t know how to. Parents in a household size of two are significantly more likely to restrict their child’s profile to just their child’s friends. Restrict Access To Child’s Social Networking Site Percent Indicated Restricted Access Base: Total Have Children Under 17 That Participate In Social Networking

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Children Q.A14 Which of the following have you discussed with your children about potential dangers on their social networking sites? The vast majority of parents whose children are social network users have discussed the potential dangers that exist, mainly how to watch out for predators. All female respondents have discussed how to watch out for predators with their child under 17. Parents in the Midwest were least likely to have discussed how to watch out for fraudsters trying to steal money and how to protect the computer from malicious software. Potential Dangers Discussed Percent Indicated Potential Dangers Base: Total Have Children Under 17 That Participate In Social Networking

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www. russellresearch.com Social Networking Children Parents in a household size of three or more were more likely to have discussed the different dangers that exist, especially how to watch out for predators with their children under 17 who use social networking sites. Potential Dangers Discussed Percent Indicated Potential Dangers Base: Total Have Children Under 17 That Participate In Social Networking Q.A14 Which of the following have you discussed with your children about potential dangers on their social networking sites?

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www. russellresearch.com Demographics

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www. russellresearch.com Demographics

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www. russellresearch.com Appendix - Security Q.A6 Which of the following steps do you take to secure your computer? Steps For A Secure Computer Percent Indicated Steps Were Taken Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Appendix - Security Q.A6 Which of the following steps do you take to secure your computer? Steps For A Secure Computer Percent Indicated Steps Were Taken Base: Total Spend Time On Social Networking Sites

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www. russellresearch.com Appendix - Security Q.A6 Which of the following steps do you take to secure your computer? Steps For A Secure Computer Percent Indicated Steps Were Taken

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www. russellresearch.com Appendix - Security Q.A6 Which of the following steps do you take to secure your computer? Steps For A Secure Computer Percent Indicated Steps Were Taken

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www. russellresearch.com Appendix - Security Q.A6 Which of the following steps do you take to secure your computer? Steps For A Secure Computer Percent Indicated Steps Were Taken

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