luiz ramos

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Production of Ethyl Esters from Crude and Refined Vegetable Oils: 

Production of Ethyl Esters from Crude and Refined Vegetable Oils Centro de Pesquisa em Química Aplicada Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Paraná – UFPR lramos@quimica.ufpr.br Luiz Pereira Ramos

Slide2: 

Soybeans Sunflower Brassica sp. Colza Peanut Corn Olive Cottonseed Sesame seeds Jatropha curcas Ricinus communis Jojoba Linseed Used cooking oils Avocado White tremoço Pequi Macaúba Buriti Dendê Palmiste Babaçu Oil content and composition Technology required for extraction Nutritional value of the oil cake Productivity per unit area Agronomic data and plant cycle Suitability for biodiesel production Are there valuable co-products?

Slide4: 

Source: ABIOVE, 2001/02 III Brazil/Germany Workshop, 2005

Slide5: 

BIODIESEL PROGRAM Production Near to comsumption sites Near to production sites

Slide6: 

BIODIESEL PROGRAM Synergy with ethanol facilities

Slide7: 

BIODIESEL PROGRAM Synergy with oil refineries

Slide8: 

Ethanolysis of crude and refined vegetable oils ETHYL ESTERS Process optimization Optimization based on experimental designs Reduction of alkali requirement for alcoholysis Decrease in the need for water washing Induction of phase separation Substitution of NaOH for KOH at low alkali loadings Improvement of oxidation stability and cold flow properties

Slide9: 

ETHYL ESTERS Ethanolysis of crude oils Crude oils may contain 1 to 5% of non-glyceride compounds such as sterols, tocopherol, phospholipids and free fatty acids (these mostly originated from the extraction procedure and/or improper storage) These compounds may strongly interfere with ethanolysis and decrease reaction yields Pretreatment methods are advisable to minimize detrimental effects such as emulsification Different types of crude oils may require different reaction conditions to produced a good quality biodiesel

Slide10: 

ETHYL ESTERS Process optimization CRUDE WILD TURNIP OIL CENTRAL COMPOSITE DESIGN PRELIMINARY OPTIMIZATION SIMPLE BUT IMPORTANT CHANGES IN PROCESS VARIABLES MAY STRONGLY INTERFERE WITH ITS ECONOMICS AND TECHNICAL VIABILITY

Slide11: 

ETHYL ESTERS Response surface ETHYL ESTERS Yield = 96.30 + 27.16RM + 22.78C – 1.15T – 14.51RM2 – 24.68(RM)C + 0.35(RM)T – 16.31C2 + 0.03CT + 1.01T2 CRUDE WILD TURNIP OIL

Slide12: 

ETHYL ESTERS Response surface Molar Ratio Catalyst (%) Yield = 96.30 + 27.16RM + 22.78C – 1.15T – 14.51RM2 – 24.68(RM)C + 0.35(RM)T – 16.31C2 + 0.03CT + 1.01T2 CRUDE WILD TURNIP OIL ETHYL ESTERS

Slide13: 

ETHYL ESTERS Response surface CRUDE WILD TURNIP OIL

Slide14: 

ETHYL ESTERS Performing the second stage … Physical treatment of methyl esters with magnesium sulfate facilitates biodiesel purification by reducing the amount of water required for washing and by removing important biodiesel contaminants such as soap, free glycerin, unreacted glycerides and moisture Now, if that is so, what if this treatment is used to eliminate water washing after the first stage of ethanolysis? Our hope was to produce an ester phase that would be readily converted to biodiesel upon a second ethanolysis stage under milder alkaline conditions

Slide15: 

ETHYL ESTERS Preliminary specification CRUDE WILD TURNIP OIL

Slide16: 

ETHYL ESTERS Preliminary specification REFINED SOYBEAN OIL

Slide17: 

BIODIESEL Process development

Slide18: 

STARCH-BASED COMPOSITES WITH NATURAL FIBRES COMPOSTING OF OIL CAKES FOR FERTILIZERS PROTONIC MEMBRANES FOR FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS BIOTECHNOLOGY VALORIZATION OF OIL CAKES STARCH-BASED BIOFILMS WITH GLYCERIN LIPASES & BIOSURFACTANTS PVC & BIOFILMS OPTIMIZATION OF ETHANOLYSIS IN ALKALINE MEDIUM GENERATION OF ELECTRICITY IN STATIONARY SYSTEMS ADDITIVES FOR INCREASING OXIDATION STABILITY ENHANCEMENT OF BIODIESELCOLD-FLOW PROPERTIES ALTERNATIVE USES FOR ETHYL ESTERS PAINTS & PLASTICIZERS LIPASES, RESINS, HDLs E ZEOLITES DEVELOPMENT OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS TECPAR EMBRAPA DA-UFPR LACTEC DEM-UFPR LACTEC LACTEC TECPAR LACTEC

Slide19: 

Apresentação do grupo EQUIPE Luiz Pereira Ramos Nádia Krieger Fernando Wypych Kestur Gundappa Satyanarayana Maria Aparecida F. César-Oliveira LABPOL Sonia Faria Zawadzki LABPOL Shirley Nakagaki Bastos LABIOIN Maria Rita Sierakowski BIOPOL Helena M. Wilhelm LACTEC

Slide21: 

Department of Chemistry, UFPR lramos@quimica.ufpr.br

authorStream Live Help