SOMP 04 Education deRuiter

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Slide1: 

- Co-operation of Industry and Academia in Minerals Engineering - Erasmus Mundus Presentation Society of Mining Professors Meeting 13 June 2004 TIMES ARE CHANGING

1980: 

1980

2004: 

2004

2004: 

2004

2010: 

2010 ? ? ? ? ?

Slide6: 

Minimum requirement TU Delft

AUSTRALIA: 

AUSTRALIA 1998 Back from the Brink Fragile system Changes needed 2000 MTEC Industry (MCA) + 15 universities (9 consortia) 5 Year program 5 Million $ from industry 2003 Review

REVIEW: 

REVIEW Gains Attention to importance of minerals education Collaboration between universities Increased understanding of Industry However Restructuring industry Funding cuts of universities Decline student numbers Declining image of minerals industry

NET RESULT: 

NET RESULT Seven options closed Three marked for closure Four rationalised / absorbed in other disciplines Closure of min. 2 programs / year in: Australia + North America + Europe CONCLUSION OF MTEC: 1. CO-PERATION BETWEEN UNIVERSITIES IS ESSENTIAL 2. THEN INDUSTRY IS WILLING TO HELP WHICH IS ALSO ESSENTIAL

SUSTAINABLE EDUCATION: 

SUSTAINABLE EDUCATION In many countries programs with traditional methods will stop sooner or later Innovative ways needed Co-operation Internationalisation E-learning Change of curriculum Industry involvement

COOPERATION !!!!: 

Delft, Freiberg 5 students 2 nationalities 0 Companies Delft, Aachen, London, Berlin, Kosice Helsinki, Miskolc, Wroclaw 42 students, 11 nationalities 25 Companies COOPERATION !!!! 2004 1900

INITIATIVES FOR CO-OPERATIONS: 

INITIATIVES FOR CO-OPERATIONS Late 80’s Delft combined mining, processing, metallurgy and recycling Low number of mining students: Delft RSM 1995 / 1996: Delft investigates possible joint curriculum, with London, Helsinki and Aachen September 1996: European Mining Course (EMC) September 1998: European Mineral Engineering Course (EMEC) September 2003: European Geotechnical and Environmental Course (EGEC)

EUROPEAN NETWORK: 

1996 1998 2003 EUROPEAN NETWORK From 2004: - Leeds - Camborne

Slide14: 

M.Sc B.Sc

PARTICIPANTS: 

PARTICIPANTS Finland (Helsinki) Germany (Aachen, Clausthal, Freiberg) Netherlands (Delft) UK (London) France (through London) Spain (through London) Greece (through London) Poland (Wroclaw) Hungary (Miskolc) Slovakia (Kosic) Estonia (Talin) Austria (Leoben) Canada (Queens University) Argentina (San Juan) USA (Virginia Tech.) Chile (Concepcion, Un. de Chile) Australia (University of Queensland)

EMC PARTICIPANTS: 

EMC PARTICIPANTS

EMEC PARTICIPANTS: 

EMEC PARTICIPANTS Country Place University 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Germany Aachen RWTH 3 3 3 5 6 Freiberg BAF 1 The Netherlands Delft TUD 1 6 6 6 6 7 Finland Helsinki HUT 1 1 United Kingdom London RSM Poland Wroclaw WUT 1 1 1 Krakow U. of K rakow 1 Slovakia Kosice U. of K osice 1 Hungary Budapest 1 Chile Concepcion U. de C 2 1 1 2 2 Argentina San Juan U. de S J 2 1 1 Total 5 14 11 14 11 18

COURSES: 

COURSES

COMPANY VISITS: 

COMPANY VISITS

Slide20: 

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

COUNTRIES OF EMPLOYMENT: 

COUNTRIES OF EMPLOYMENT Argentina Australia Austria Brasil Canada Chile Finland France Germany Ireland Malaysia Nigeria Oman Poland Portugal South Africa Spain Surinam Sweden The Netherlands UK USA

EUROPEAN NETWORK: 

Delft Helsinki Leeds Camborne Aachen Clausthal Freiberg EUROPEAN NETWORK EMC - EMEC Future clusters Wroclaw Miskolc Kosice EGEC Berlin

WORLD WIDE NETWORK: 

WORLD WIDE NETWORK

INDUSTRY: 

INDUSTRY In beginning holding back After 2 years showed interest because: Liked co-operation between the universities Quality of courses Soft skills, because of travelling English language After 3 years Realised potential for recruitment international staff Realised that funding was needed

FEMP (1999): 

FEMP (1999) FEMP Associated universities Canada: Queen’s, McGill USA: Colorado School of Mines, Virginia Tech Australia:Queensland Chile: Concepcion, U. de Chile Argentina:San Juan Europe: France, Belgium, Sweden, Austria, Poland, etc. EMC EMEC EGEC Industry Anglo American Plc. Rio Tinto BHP-Billiton Falconbridge Minera Alumbrera KGHM RAG Rheinbraun Heidelberg Cement Arctic Platinum Partnership Corus Pechiney Outokumpu Umicore Norddeutsche Affinerie AKZO Tamrock Caterpillar Walter Beckers IHC RAG Saarberg ABN-AMRO Wirtschafstvereinigung Bergbau Euromines

CURRENT INDUSTRIAL PARTNERS: 

CURRENT INDUSTRIAL PARTNERS ARCTIC PLATINUM PARTNERSHIP

BENEFITS OF THE PROGRAMS: 

BENEFITS OF THE PROGRAMS Multinational group Intensive program English language Industry contacts Job interviews Flexibility Networking

ALUMNI CONTACTS: 

ALUMNI CONTACTS > 200 alumni and students per mid 2004 Co-ordination by Aachen & Delft Maintain database (web-based per June 2004) 4th reunion 2003 in Aachen 70 students + alumni (>50%) 30 industry + universities Workshop by Heidelberg Cement / ENCI 1 Day workshop + network evening 1 Day social / sport activities

RECOGNITION: 

RECOGNITION RWTH Best teaching award 2003

AREAS OF COOPERATION WITH INDUSTRY: 

AREAS OF COOPERATION WITH INDUSTRY Network Recruitment Internships 30 international internships from RTZ and Anglo Research

FINANCES: 

FINANCES Additional cost to students: 3,500 - 4,000 Socrates: no tuition fee mobility grant: 1,000 Industry for accommodation 2,500 – 3,000

FINANCES FOR 40 STUDENTS: 

FINANCES FOR 40 STUDENTS Tuition Fee at home university (Socrates or exchange) COST PAID BY Cost of teaching 500,000 Universities Travel 50,000 Socrates Accommodation 120,000 FEMP (industry) Reunion 10,000 FEMP (industry) Misc. costs 10,000 FEMP (industry) Organisation 50,000 TU Delft

FUTURE: 

FUTURE Independent B.SC. programs under pressure / disappear University fees increase rapidly (UK, NL) Enrolment drops further Many allocation models include credit for exchange students. This may disappear M.Sc. programs need fee basis Non EU students: Erasmus Mundus EU students: Industry

ERASMUS MUNDUS: 

ERASMUS MUNDUS EU wants to increase number of non-EU M.Sc. Students Attract those by scholarships Looks for relatively large cooperative programs

ERASMUS MUNDUS: 

ERASMUS MUNDUS At least three EU universities in different countries Students spend time at minimum of 2 universities. Students from overseas are joining Double degrees are needed Industry co-operation

ERASMUS MUNDUS: 

ERASMUS MUNDUS 2004 – 2008 280 million Euro 250 Master courses EU seal Scholarships (5000 + 1600 Euro/month) for incoming students (4200) Scholarships (5000 + 1000 Euro/month) for outgoing students (4000)

ERASMUS MUNDUS: 

ERASMUS MUNDUS => 19 students from outside EU => 4 scholars Full M.Sc. Program (incl. thesis) E.g. 120 ECTS points No undergraduate students Fixed fee for all students Non EU fee EU fee (also for own students)

ERASMUS MUNDUS: 

ERASMUS MUNDUS Scholarships non EU students 5000 fixed 1600/month Fee for the network paid from scholarship Tuition fee per partner distributed

ERASMUS MUNDUS: 

ERASMUS MUNDUS EM Actions: 1. Program recognition 2. Scholarships non EU students going to EU 3. Partnerships non EU universities (later) 4. Trans Europe organisations (alumni, etc)

FUTURE CHALLENGES: 

FUTURE CHALLENGES Declining trend is expected to continue in next 3 years Less enrolment Less Funding Excluding of exchange students in allocation Rapidly increasing break-even requirements Problems to attract staff Pressure to: close programs or Industry support, if industry likes to keep education

STRATEGY: 

STRATEGY 1 Program with 3 options 10 Universities 60 students 40 EU 20 non EU 120 ECTS Joint degrees possible (> 30% of ECTS) ~ Fee: 10,000 non EU (Erasmus Mundus) 3,000 EU (difference with local fee through scholarships)

STRATEGY: 

STRATEGY Integrate infrastructure EMC, EMEC, EGEC Registration BlackBoard Printed material (Course Summary) Define procedures Get approval for double degrees Design fee structure

CONCLUSIONS: 

CONCLUSIONS If nothing is done, EXTINCTION Things don’t happen automatically Initiative has to come from universities Co-operation of universities is essential !! Many benefits for students Industry is willing to help but wants to see initiatives first

CONCLUSIONS: 

CONCLUSIONS GLOBAL INDUSTRY LOOKS FOR GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION IF WE HAD FIRST DEVELOPED IT ON PAPER WE WOULD NOT HAVE SUCCEEDED !!

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