ZORA NEALE HURSTON

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ZORA NEALE HURSTON:

ZORA NEALE HURSTON "I have the nerve to walk my own way, however hard, in my search for reality, rather than climb upon the rattling wagon of wishful illusions."       - Letter from Zora Neale Hurston to Countee Cullen

Growing UP:

Growing UP Born in Alabama in 1891 Raised in Eatonville, FL. First all-black incorporated town in the US Her dad (John) served several terms as mayor

EDUCATION & WORK:

EDUCATION & WORK Studied anthropology at Howard University in Washington, D.C. Collector of stories and folk traditions Collected folklore and made recordings in Florida and other areas of the South in the late 1920s. Worked with the Federal Writer's Project interviewing Floridians about their lives and culture and recording and collecting the diverse folk songs of her native state Traveled to Haiti, Jamaica, and Honduras to study folklore and customs

Belle Glade, Florida, Arthur Rothstein, photographer, January, 1937. :

Belle Glade, Florida, Arthur Rothstein, photographer, January, 1937. "We goin ' on de muck." " Whut's de muck, and where is it at?" "Oh down in de Everglades round Clewiston and Belle Glade where dey raise all dat cane and string-beans and tomatuhs . Folks don't do nothin ' down dere but make money and fun and foolishness. We must go dere ." Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God , chapter 13.

Writing:

Writing 1935: Had published several short stories and articles, a novel ( Jonah's Gourd Vine ), and a collection of black Southern folklore ( Mules and Men ). Late 1930s – early '40s: zenith of her career. Published masterwork, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937),followed by Tell My Horse ; Moses, Man of the Mountain; autobiography, Dust Tracks on a Road

DEATH & REPUTATION:

DEATH & REPUTATION In 1959, after suffering a stroke, Hurston was forced to enter a welfare home where she died in 1960. Buried in an unmarked grave Hurston’s writing was rarely studied until 1975, when Alice Walker (author of The Color Purple ) published the article "In Search of Zora Neale Hurston" in a magazine, which led to a rediscovery of Hurston by teachers and scholars.

“I have known the joy and pain of friendship. I have served and been served. I have made some good enemies for which I am not a bit sorry. I have loved unselfishly, and I have fondled hatred with the red-hot tongs of Hell. That's living.” :

“I have known the joy and pain of friendship. I have served and been served. I have made some good enemies for which I am not a bit sorry. I have loved unselfishly, and I have fondled hatred with the red-hot tongs of Hell. That's living.”

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