Special Needs Computers AODA

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Special Needs Computers.ca : 

Special Needs Computers.ca Accessibility for All We help YOU Empower Yourself! © 2010

Accessibility for Ontarian with Disabilities Act 2005 : 

Accessibility for Ontarian with Disabilities Act 2005 How do you feel you are meeting the needs of your disabled patrons? Do you know who your disabled patrons are? Important! Every person who is guilty of an offence under this Act is liable on conviction, (a) to a fine of not more than $50,000 for each day or part of a day on which the offence occurs or continues to occur; or (b) if the person is a corporation, to a fine of not more than $100,000 for each day or part of a day on which the offence occurs or continues to occur. 2005, c. 11, s. 37 (3). Applicable – Government, Non-Profits, Schools, All Businesses More later…

Disability : 

Disability The World Health Organization defines Disability as follows: "Disabilities is an umbrella term, covering impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. An impairment is a problem in body function or structure; an activity limitation is a difficulty encountered by an individual in executing a task or action; while a participation restriction is a problem experienced by an individual in involvement in life situations. Thus disability is a complex phenomenon, reflecting an interaction between features of a person’s body and features of the society in which he or she lives.'"[1] An individual may also qualify as disabled if he/she has had an impairment in the past or is seen as disabled based on a personal or group standard or norm. Such impairments may include physical, sensory, and cognitive or developmental disabilities. Mental disorders (also known as psychiatric or psychosocial disability) and various types of chronic disease may also be considered qualifying disabilities. A disability may occur during a person's lifetime or may be present from birth. A physical impairment is any disability which limits the physical function of limbs or fine or gross motor ability.

Did You Know : 

Did You Know In Ontario, there are 1.9 million people with disabilities (Jan. 2003).  This number is expected to increase as the population ages.  Two decades from now, it is estimated that nearly 20 per cent of the population will have a disability—that’s one in every five people. It is estimated that people with disabilities are responsible for $25 billion in annual consumer buying power in Canada.  When many people hear “disability,” they jump to the image of someone in a wheelchair.  In fact, the seven disability types identified by Statistics Canada are: hearing, seeing, speaking, agility, mobility, mental/learning and other physical disabilities. 68% of Ontarians with disabilities live outside of Toronto. - http://www.theatreontario.org/content/news22-4.htm Accessibility is a human right of EVERYONE

Statistics Canada : 

Statistics Canada Adults with disabilities that need help with everyday activities 2001 and 2006 Adapted from Statistics Canada Publication 89-628-x Number 15 Table 3 Date Modified: 2010-01-29 Close to half of the recorded Adults with disabilities live in Ontario

Breaking The Barriers : 

Breaking The Barriers

Environmental : 

Environmental Architectural and physical barriers are features of buildings or spaces that cause problems for people with disabilities. Hallways and doorways that are too narrow for a person using a wheelchair, electric scooter or walker Counters that are too high for a person of short stature Poor lighting for people with low vision Doorknobs that are difficult for people with arthritis to grasp Parking spaces that are too narrow for a driver who uses a wheelchair Telephones that are not equipped with telecommunications devices for people who are Deaf, deafened or hard of hearing

BEHAVIOURAL : 

BEHAVIOURAL Attitudinal barriers are those that discriminate against people with disabilities. Thinking that people with disabilities are inferior Assuming that a person who has a speech impairment can't understand you

Comprehension : 

Comprehension Information or communications barriers happen when a person can't easily understand information. Print is too small to read Websites that can't be accessed by people who do are not able to use a mouse Signs that are not clear or easily understood

Safety : 

Safety Making sure that everyone can “see” and “hear” alarms Strobe light fire alarms TTY phones Sign Language Interpreter software

Accommodations : 

Accommodations Adjusting or making suitable. Technology barriers occur when a technology can't be modified to support various assistive devices.

What is Assistive Technology? : 

What is Assistive Technology? (AT) is a generic term for devices and modifications (for a person or within a society) that help overcome or remove a disability.

High Tech Accommodations : 

High Tech Accommodations Abbreviation Expansion - Software, which allows the use of abbreviations for frequently used words and phrases and for instant speech. Simply type the abbreviation, keys automatically substitutes it with the complete word or phrase. Alternative Input Devices - A variety of devices that take the place of a mouse. Examples include, head pointing, eye movement tracking systems and touch sensitive monitor screens. Alternative Keyboards - A variety of keyboards that take the place and or modify a standard Qwerty keyboard. On-Screen Keyboards - Software that displays a picture of a keyboard. A user simply points and clicks on the picture of various keys displayed as a keyboard on the computer screen.

High Tech Accommodations : 

Assistive Listening Devices (ALD's) - Small personal electronic devices (transmitter and receiver) used to amplify sounds to help a person hear better. ALD's come in three categories: FM, infrared and wired systems. Augmentative Communication Devices - A device, which assists speech impaired, or non-verbal individuals with communication through synthesized or recorded speech. Chat Software - Programs that allow typing of messages back and forth between computer users in real time. TTY/TDD Software - A program that allows a computer to be used as a TTY. TTY or TDD Machines - Hardware devices with a keyboard and display used to communicate over the telephone system by typing text. High Tech Accommodations

Slide 15: 

Speech Recognition System - Software that, when used with a microphone, allows the computer user to use speech as an alternative input method. Switches - Input devices that function in an on or off state used to operate a computer by some part of a person's body in which they have control. Word Macro Program - Software that can execute a series of prerecorded keystrokes to increase input rate. Word Prediction Program - An input acceleration method, which reduces the keystrokes required by creating a list of possible words from which to choose. Voice Command and Control - Software similar to speech recognition but is limited to menu-type functions and limited dictation. High Tech Accommodations

Mobility Accommodations : 

Mobility Accommodations A disabling condition or other health impairment that requires adaptation

Vision Accommodations : 

Vision Accommodations Difficulty seeing ordinary newsprint or clearly seeing someone’s face from 4 metres away (12 feet).

Slide 18: 

Reading Machine - Hardware device that combines advanced speech synthesis, intelligent character recognition, and a portable scanner in a portable machine. Refreshable Braille Display - Output device with Braille cells that dynamically change (refresh) as the user scrolls through an electronic document. Screen Magnification - Software that enlarges text and graphics on the computer screen. Screen Reader - Software that provides visual information in audio format for computer users. Speech Synthesizer - Hardware or Software used to produce audio output for use with screen readers. Video Magnifier (CCTV) - Hardware device that uses a video camera connected to a computer or a TV monitor to enlarge documents or objects that are placed under the camera. Vision Accommodations

Vision Accommodations : 

Braille Embosser – Output device used to produce raised Braille dots on paper Braille Translator – Software used to convert text document into Braille Large Print Keyboard - A quality PC compatible keyboard with bold large print legends for easy use. Large Monitor - A monitor larger than standard size used to increase character size in proportion to the monitor dimensions. Optical Character Recognition Reading System (OCR) - An integrated computer system consisting of a scanner, screen reader, sound card (or voice synthesizer) with software that can convert scanned text into recognizable characters which are read out loud by a synthesized voice. Scanning Program - Software that, when used with a switch, a highlight moves over a picture of a keyboard. Select the switch to choose the desired key and the scanning program sends it to the application being used. Vision Accommodations

Hearing and Speech Accommodations : 

Hearing and Speech Accommodations Difficulty hearing what is being said in a conversation with one other person, in a conversation with three or more persons, or in a telephone conversation. Difficulty speaking and / or being understood.

Cognitive Accommodations : 

Cognitive Accommodations Persons with cognitive disabilities may have difficulty with various types of mental tasks. Functional cognitive disabilities may involve difficulties or deficits involving problem-solving, attention, memory, math comprehension, visual comprehension, reading, linguistic, and verbal comprehension. - http://www.disabled-world.com/disability/types/cognitive/

Cognitive Accommodations : 

Scanner - Hardware device that is used to transfer text and color images to your computer for document or web page reading. Used in conjunction with OCR or Text Reader Software (Open Book Ruby Edition or Read Anywhere). Text Reader - Software used with a sound card to read in a synthesized voice the text that is on a computer screen. Cognitive Accommodations

What You Need To Know : 

What You Need To Know

Accessibility for Ontarian with Disabilities Act 2005 : 

Accessibility for Ontarian with Disabilities Act 2005 PART IINTERPRETATION Purpose 1.  Recognizing the history of discrimination against persons with disabilities in Ontario, the purpose of this Act is to benefit all Ontarians by, (a) developing, implementing and enforcing accessibility standards in order to achieve accessibility for Ontarians with disabilities with respect to goods, services, facilities, accommodation, employment, buildings, structures and premises on or before January 1, 2025; and (b) providing for the involvement of persons with disabilities, of the Government of Ontario and of representatives of industries and of various sectors of the economy in the development of the accessibility standards. 2005, c. 11, s. 1. Definitions 2.  In this Act, “accessibility standard” means an accessibility standard made by regulation under section 6; (“norme d’accessibilité”)

Accessibility for Ontarian with Disabilities Act 2005 : 

Accessibility for Ontarian with Disabilities Act 2005 “barrier” means anything that prevents a person with a disability from fully participating in all aspects of society because of his or her disability, including a physical barrier, an architectural barrier, an information or communications barrier, an attitudinal barrier, a technological barrier, a policy or a practice; (“obstacle”) “director” means a director appointed under section 30; (“directeur”) “disability” means, (a) any degree of physical disability, infirmity, malformation or disfigurement that is caused by bodily injury, birth defect or illness and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, includes diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, a brain injury, any degree of paralysis, amputation, lack of physical co-ordination, blindness or visual impediment, deafness or hearing impediment, muteness or speech impediment, or physical reliance on a guide dog or other animal or on a wheelchair or other remedial appliance or device, (b) a condition of mental impairment or a developmental disability, (c) a learning disability, or a dysfunction in one or more of the processes involved in understanding or using symbols or spoken language, (d) a mental disorder, or (e) an injury or disability for which benefits were claimed or received under the insurance plan established under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997; (“handicap”)

Accessibility for Ontarian with Disabilities Act 2005 : 

Accessibility for Ontarian with Disabilities Act 2005 http://www.elaws.gov.on.ca/html/statutes/english/elaws_statutes_05a11_e.htm S.O. 2005, CHAPTER 11 Consolidation Period: From December 15, 2009 to Tuesday May 4, 2010 Last amendment: 2009, c. 33, Sched. 8, s. 1. Offences 37.  (1)  A person is guilty of an offence who, (a) furnishes false or misleading information in an accessibility report filed with a director under this Act or otherwise provides a director with false or misleading information; (b) fails to comply with any order made by a director or the Tribunal under this Act; or (c) contravenes subsection 20 (8) or subsection (2). 2005, c. 11, s. 37 (1).

AODA 2005 : 

Same, intimidation (2)  No person shall intimidate, coerce, penalize or discriminate against another person because that person, (a) has sought or is seeking the enforcement of this Act or of a director’s order made under this Act; (b) has co-operated or may co-operate with inspectors; or (c) has provided, or may provide, information in the course of an inspection or proceeding under this Act. 2005, c. 11, s. 37 (2). Penalties (3)  Every person who is guilty of an offence under this Act is liable on conviction, (a) to a fine of not more than $50,000 for each day or part of a day on which the offence occurs or continues to occur; or (b) if the person is a corporation, to a fine of not more than $100,000 for each day or part of a day on which the offence occurs or continues to occur. 2005, c. 11, s. 37 (3). Duty of director or officer (4)  Every director or officer of a corporation has a duty to take all reasonable care to prevent the corporation from committing an offence under this section. 2005, c. 11, s. 37 (4). AODA 2005

AODA 2005 : 

Offence (5)  Every director or officer of a corporation who has a duty under subsection (4) and who fails to carry out that duty is guilty of an offence and on conviction is liable to a fine of not more than $50,000 for each day or part of a day on which the offence occurs or continues to occur. 2005, c. 11, s. 37 (5). Consolidation Period: From December 15, 2009 to the e-Laws currency date. http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/navigation?file=currencyDates&lang=en Last amendment: 2009, c. 33, Sched. 8, s. 1. Offences 37.  (1)  A person is guilty of an offence who, (a) furnishes false or misleading information in an accessibility report filed with a director under this Act or otherwise provides a director with false or misleading information; (b) fails to comply with any order made by a director or the Tribunal under this Act; or (c) contravenes subsection 20 (8) or subsection (2). 2005, c. 11, s. 37 (1). © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2010. - Underline added AODA 2005

Accessibility Standards for Customer Service : 

Accessibility Standards for Customer Service The Accessibility Standards for Customer Service became law on January 1, 2008. All businesses or organizations that provide goods or services to the public or to other third parties in Ontario are legally required to comply with the requirements of the standard. Public sector organizations must: Comply with the standard by January 1, 2010, and File their first accessibility report by March 31, 2010. www.accesson.ca

Information Found On These Websites : 

Information Found On These Websites http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/accesson/understandingDisabilities/index.aspx http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disability http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/html/statutes/english/elaws_statutes_05a11_e.htm http://www.accesson.ca Disability Awareness and Customer Service for People with Disabilities - Video produced by the Ontario Ministry of Travel and Recreation. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOzXbn7mVmM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKloeBy3Qi8 Disability Etiquette - http://www.youtube.com/v/mVqz0LKphws

In Conclusion : 

In Conclusion People with disabilities have dreams, hopes and goals. They have problems, challenges and needs. Just like everyone else. Treat people with disabilities with patience, understanding and respect. After all, isn't that how YOU like to be treated?

In Conclusion : 

Please note: This presentation is for informational/educational purposes only. The information enclosed is not legal or medical advice of any manner; but a grouping of information obtained from the Internet and put together to help one be aware of various disabilities in Ontario, Canada. © 2010 Special Needs Computers www.SpecialNeedsComputers.ca 1-877-724-4922 1-877-725-7799 – Fax sales@specialneedscomputers.ca In Conclusion

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