Glossopharyngeal nerve

Views:
 
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Glossopharyngeal nerve:

Glossopharyngeal nerve

Slide2:

The cranial nerves are named as follows: I. Olfactory II. Optic III. Oculomotor IV. Trochlear V. Trigeminal VI. Abducent VII. Facial VIII. Vestibulocochlear IX. Glossopharyngeal X. Vagus XI. Accessory XII. Hypoglossal

The glossopharyngeal nerve(glosso=tongue; -pharyngeal=thoat) is a mixed cranial nerve. Sensory axons of the glossopharyngeal nerve from taste buds and somatic sensory receptors on the posterior one-thired of the thongue,:

The glossopharyngeal nerve( glosso =tongue; -pharyngeal= thoat ) is a mixed cranial nerve. Sensory axons of the glossopharyngeal nerve from taste buds and somatic sensory receptors on the posterior one- thired of the thongue ,

Slide4:

From proprioceptors in swallowing muscles supplied by the motor portion, from barorecptors ( sterach receptors) in the carotid sinus, and from chemoreceptors in the carotid body near the carotid artetries .

Slide5:

The cell bodies of these sensory neurons are located in the superior and inferior ganglia. From the ganglia, sensory axons pass through the jugular foramen and end in the medulla.

Slide6:

Axons of motor neurons in the glossopharyngeal nerve arise in nuclei of the medulla aand exit the skull through the jugular foramen and end in the medulla.

Slide7:

Axons of motor neurons in the glossopharyngeal nerve arise in nuclei of the medulla and exit the skull through the jugular foramen.

Slide8:

Somatic motor neurons innervate the stylopharyngeus muscle, which elevates the pharynx and larynx, and autonomic motor neurons (parasympathetic) stimulate the paratid gland to secrete saliva.

Slide9:

Some of the cell bodies of para sympathetic motor neurons are located in the Otic ganglion.

Important Branches of the Glossopharyngeal Nerve :

Important Branches of the Glossopharyngeal Nerve Tympanic branch passes to the tympanic plexus in the middle ear . Preganglionic parasympathetic fibers for the parotid salivary gland now leave the plexus as the lesser petrosal nerve , and they synapse in the otic ganglion.

Slide12:

Carotid branch contains sensory fibers from the carotid sinus ( pressoreceptor mechanism for the regulation of blood pressure and the carotid body and chemoreceptor mechanism for the regulation of heart rate and respiration).

Slide13:

Nerve to the stylopharyngeus muscle Pharyngeal branches run to the pharyngeal plexus and also receive branches from the vagus nerve and the sympathetic trunk.

Slide14:

Lingual branch passes to the mucous mem - brane of the posterior third of the tongue (including the vallate papillae). The glossopharyngeal nerve thus assists swallowing and promotes salivation.

Slide15:

It also conducts sensation from the pharynx and the back of the tongue and carries impulses, which influence the arterial blood pressure and respiration, from the carotid sinus and carotid body.

Slide16:

Reference: 1.Gerard J.Tortora,Bryan Derrickson,PRINCIPAL OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY,JOHN WILEY&SONS,INC 2.Richard S. Snell CLINIAL NEUROANATOMY Lippincott Williams& Wilkins

authorStream Live Help