Canada 2007

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DEMOGRAPHICS

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CANADA AT A GLANCE Demographics Population: 32,623,490 Urban Population 80%, Rural 20% Capital: Ottawa, Ontario Gender: Male 49.5%, Female 50.5% Median Age: 38.9 Languages: English 59%, French 23%, Other 18% Source: Statistics Canada 2007-01-31 & CIA Factbook

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Ontario 12,687.0 Quebec 7,651.5 British Columbia 4,310.5 Population by Province (000’s) Source: Statistics Canada Sask.* = Saskatchewan N.B.* = New Brunswick 749.2 P.E.I.* = Prince Edward Island 138.5 Nova Scotia 934.4 Manitoba 1,177.8 North West Territories 41.9 Yukon 31.2 N.B.* Newfoundland 509.7 Sask.* 985.4 P.E.I *. Alberta 3375.8 Nunavut 30.8 POPULATION BY PROVINCE Source: Statistics Canada 2007-01-31

Approximately 90% of Canadians live within 100 miles of the US Border: 

Approximately 90% of Canadians live within 100 miles of the US Border San Diego Los Angeles San Francisco Detroit Seattle Boston New York Philadelphia Washington Chicago Buffalo Cleveland Toronto Vancouver Atlanta Miami Winnipeg Regina Calgary Minneapolis ThunderBay Montreal Ottawa Halifax Anchorage Edmonton Dallas Source: CIA Factbook

CANADA’S TOP 10 CITIES: 

CANADA’S TOP 10 CITIES Source: Statistics Canada 2007-01-31 & http://www.toronto.ca/invest-in-toronto/tor_overview.htm Toronto is Canada’s largest metropolitan area and ranks among the top five city regions in North America which includes Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia.

TORONTO AT A GLANCE: 

Toronto boasts strong employment in both manufacturing and financial services, differentiating it from most major American cities. Toronto generates one-fifth of Canada’s GDP. The Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) is ranked North America’s third largest by dollar value traded. Toronto is Canada’s largest retail market. Source: Toronto Business and Market Guide 2004 TORONTO AT A GLANCE

TORONTO – “THE CITY OF THE FUTURE”: 

TORONTO – “THE CITY OF THE FUTURE” www.investincanada.com - Based on June 27, 2005 news release FDI Magazine, a subsidiary of the Financial Times of London, awarded the Greater Toronto Area the distinction of the “Top City Region of the Future”. City of the Future “With a population of five million people, the Greater Toronto Area is Canada’s largest and most diverse consumer and commercial/industrial marketplace. What makes it a Powerhouse, has much to do with its location…within a one-day drive of 125 million Americans – more than 40% of the US population.” Best Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Promotion “The GTA is well-promoted. The GTMA promotes the region to international audiences at trade shows, seminars, conferences and through targeted investment attraction missions and ‘pre-qualified meetings’ in Europe, the U.S, as well as India and Australia.” Best Transport “The Toronto Region is one of Canada’s major transportation centers. Its airports, major highways, seaports and rail services give the city’s business easy access to prosperous consumer and industrial markets.” Best IT and Telecom “The GTA is Canada’s premier business region, and telecoms play a key role. Broadband is available to 90% of businesses and households.” Best Quality of Life “There are many reasons why the GTA offers the best quality of life, cost and availability of housing…excellent healthcare facilities…leading educational institutions and its cosmopolitan nature with 44% of all immigrants in Canada settling in the Greater Toronto Area.”

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Statistics suggest that Toronto’s population is one of the most ethnically diverse in the world. Source: “The Changing Face of Canada”, The Globe and Mail January 22, 2003 GROWING ETHNICITY

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Top 10 Countries whose Emigrants came to Canada between 1991 and 2001 Source: ”The Changing Face of Canada”, The Globe and Mail January 22, 2003 *Excludes Hong Kong ORIGIN OF CANADIAN IMMIGRANTS

ONE OF THE BEST PLACES TO LIVE: 

ONE OF THE BEST PLACES TO LIVE Index Quality of Life Index – Based on World Competitive Yearbook Canada ranks #1 for quality of life among the G-7 nations. http://www.investincanada.gc.ca/CMFiles/331,65, Best Overall Quality of Life

CANADA – LOWEST COST OF LIVING: 

CANADA – LOWEST COST OF LIVING Index Cost of Living – World Rank (New York City =100) Canada has the lowest cost of living among the G-7. http://www.investincanada.gc.ca

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ECONOMY

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MAJOR TRADING PARTNERS Canada is the United States’ largest trading partner. http://www.investincanada.com/en/885/A_Great_Place_to_Live.html

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GDP GROWTH PROJECTIONS Canada was a strong performer in GDP growth over 2003-2006 and is expected to continue its robust performance in 2007-2008. Real GDP Projections (%) 2003-6 2007-8 http://www.investincanada.gc.ca/CMFiles/think!0407_EngW.ppt#286,9,A Growing Domestic Economy

CANADA – EDUCATION HIGHLIGHTS: 

CANADA – EDUCATION HIGHLIGHTS #1 in higher education achievement - More than half of Canadians between the ages of 25 to 35 have a post-secondary education, either at university, college or technical school. Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook, 2006 First in North America for secondary school enrolment - Canada ranks 3rd in the world, far head of the US (26th) and Mexico (53th ). Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook, 2006 Canada outperforms the United States in educational system, educational assessment, language skills, economic literacy, quality of engineers. Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook, 2006. One of the world’s top performers in math, science and literacy - based on the U.S. department of education 2006 study, Canada systematically outperformed the US in math, science and literacy. Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook, 2006 Two Canadian universities are in the top 25 business schools of the Financial Times MBA ranking 2006 - Canada’s York University and the University of Western Ontario are ranked among the best MBA schools in the world in 18th and 24th position respectively. Canada also ranked 3rd worldwide in terms of number of programs offered. Source: Financial Times, 2006 http://www.investincanada.com/en/873/Smart_Workforce.html

EDUCATION – CANADA RANKS #1: 

EDUCATION – CANADA RANKS #1 Canada’s workforce is highly skilled. % Higher Education Achievement http://www.investincanada.gc.ca/CMFiles/think!0407_EngW.ppt#319,49,The World’s Best-Educated Workforce

TOP MARKS IN EDUCATION: 

TOP MARKS IN EDUCATION #1 in higher education achievement - More than half of Canadians between the ages of 25 to 35 have a post-secondary education, either at university, college or technical school. Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook, 2006 First in North America for secondary school enrolment - Canada ranks 3rd in the world, far head of the US (26th) and Mexico (53th). Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook, 2006 Canada outperforms the United States in educational system, educational assessment, language skills, and economic literacy. Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook, 2006. One of the world’s top performers in math, science and literacy - Based on the US department of education 2006 study, Canada systematically outperformed the US in math, science and literacy. Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook, 2006 Two Canadian universities are in the top 25 business schools of the Financial Times MBA ranking 2006 - Canada’s York University and the University of Western Ontario are ranked among the best MBA schools in the world in 18th and 24th position respectively. Canada also ranked 3rd worldwide in terms of number of programs offered. Source: Financial Times, 2006 http://www.investincanada.gc.ca/en/873/Smart_Workforce.html

CANADA – LOW BUSINESS COSTS: 

CANADA – LOW BUSINESS COSTS Overall Business Costs Source: http://www.investincanada.gc.ca/CMFiles/305,38,Lowest Overall Business Costs Index U.S.A. = 100 Canada is the least costly country to conduct business among the G-7 nations.

CANADIAN CITIES - LOWER BUSINESS COSTS: 

CANADIAN CITIES - LOWER BUSINESS COSTS Overall Cost Advantage (Disadvantage) by Large Cities Business costs in Toronto and Montreal are lower than most North American cities of comparable size. Index U.S.A. = 100 http://www.competitivealternatives.com/highlights/cities.html

A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE: 

Canada ranks first among G7 countries for: Best overall quality of life In a recent quality-of-life ranking of 215 world cities by Mercer Human Resources Consulting, five Canadian cities ranked among the top 25. Canada has the best overall quality of life among the G-7. A Land of Equal Opportunity Canada ranks first among the G-7 in providing equal opportunities for individuals. Lowest Cost of Living Canada has the lowest cost of living among the G-7. Best in addressing environmental concerns As measured by the Environmental Performance Index (EPI), Canada’s ranks 2nd in the G-7 and 8th in a 133-country study in terms of effectively reducing environmental stresses on human health and promoting ecosystem vitality and sound natural resource management. Safest Place to live Canada leads the G-7 in terms of the safest place to live and conduct business with the most fairly administered judicial system. Best Human Development In the latest United Nations Human Development Report, Canada ranked first among the G-7 countries and fifth among 177 countries A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE http://www.investincanada.gc.ca/CMFiles/think!0407_EngW.ppt#306,38,Lowest Business Costs Among Major Cities

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MEDIA LANDSCAPE

MEDIA IN CANADA: 

MEDIA IN CANADA Radio 602 commercial radio stations in Canada Daily Newspapers 134 daily newspapers Consumer Magazines Over 800 consumer magazines in Canada & 900 business/trade journals Television 141 commercial television stations Source: Canadian Media Directors’ Council - Media Digest 2007

AD REVENUE BY MEDIA - CANADA: 

AD REVENUE BY MEDIA - CANADA 2005 Ad Revenue Source: Canadian Media Directors’ Council - Media Digest 2007 Newspapers are second only to television for total advertising revenue. (Million of Dollars)

AD REVENUE BY MEDIA - CANADA: 

AD REVENUE BY MEDIA - CANADA 2005 Advertising Revenue Source: Canadian Media Directors’ Council - Media Digest 2007 Newspapers are second only to television for total advertising revenue.

A LEADER IN PC AND INTERNET USAGE: 

A LEADER IN PC AND INTERNET USAGE http://www.investincanada.gc.ca/CMFiles/think!0407_EngW.ppt#323,53,Among Leaders in PCs and Internet Users Personal Computers Per 1,000 Inhabitants Internet Users Per 1,000 Inhabitants Canadians are wired. They are second only to the U.S. for personal computer ownership and third for internet usage per capita.

U.S. PUBLICATION CIRCULATION IN CANADA: 

U.S. PUBLICATION CIRCULATION IN CANADA Source: Audit Bureau of Circulations - Globe & Mail (AS - Sept 06), U.S. Magazines (PS Dec 06), , U.S. Newspapers (PS Mar 07), NY Times (Sept 06). Are you Reaching Canadians with your U.S Media? NO! Circulation (000’s)

2006 NADbank Highlights: 

The Globe and Mail delivers the most sought-after audience in Canada: Source: 2006 NADbank Study - 50 National Markets 2006 NADbank Highlights Daily: 878,400 Saturday: 1,032,200 6-day cume: 2,370,300 Reaching more Canadians with: University Post-Graduate education Personal Income $75,000 or higher Senior Management/Professional Titles than any other newspaper in Canada

YOUR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE - WEEKDAY: 

National Readership Weekday – 50 Common Markets Toronto CMA Markets Outside of Toronto Weekday – Toronto 48 Markets outside Toronto +66% +70% +65% YOUR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE - WEEKDAY Weekday – Toronto CMA Source: 2006 NADbank Study

QUALITY: 

QUALITY Editorial Full range of views, consistent, comprehensive editorial Most National Newspaper Awards Public Policy Journalism Award The World's most Respected Voices

Our strength is delivering the elite, upscale, market across Canada: 

Our strength is delivering the elite, upscale, market across Canada Our readers are influential. They make the business buying decisions and they have a high personal disposable income. They are your best prospects. You can’t reach Canada through pan-North American media. The Globe and Mail is a leading media brand in Canada with a history of consistent credibility and respect.

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