Listen and Take Notes

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Active Listening and Effective Notetaking : 

Active Listening and Effective Notetaking Make the most of your class time

Murphy’s Laws : 

Murphy’s Laws Nothing is as easy as it looks. Everything takes longer than you think. If anything can go wrong, it will.

Hurney’s Law : 

Hurney’s Law Half of the final exam questions will come from the notes you missed in lectures. Baxter’s Corollary The other half will come from the notes you cannot decipher.

Tip #1 : 

Tip #1 Prepare to listen.

Are hearing and listening the same thing? : 

Are hearing and listening the same thing? Hearing physiological Listening processing seeking to understand involves thinking analyzing YOU ARE ACTIVELY INVOLVED! No

Pre-Class Preparation : 

Pre-Class Preparation Complete assignments Preview that day’s content read or survey chapter create a chapter map SQ3R survey, question, read, recite, review Review the last day’s content

In-Class Preparation : 

In-Class Preparation Take course materials to class Arrive on time Sit near the front of the class (How far does the professor’s energy go?) Have/get/create a purpose for listening (It is costing you about 25.00/hour!) Everything you do is a choice

Tip #2 : 

Tip #2 Develop a notetaking system and format that works for you.

What kind of system and format works for you? : 

What kind of system and format works for you? Formal Outline? Informal Outline? Cornell Format? Running Text? Another Format?

Running Text : 

Running Text Notes on Notes: This is an example of a running text system. Notes are used to help you identify major and minor points in a lecture. A variety of notetaking styles include 1.) running text (looks like a paragraph) 2.) Formal outline,(Roman/Arabic numerals) 3.)informal outlines (symbols, indentions) There are also different formats to choose from, 1.)Cornell, and 2. Several others.

Formal Outline : 

Formal Outline Notes on Notes: 9/14/98 I. Uses of Notes A. identify major points in a lecture B. identify minor points in a lecture II. 3 different notetaking systems: A. running text B. formal outline C. informal outline III. Different Formats: A. Cornell B. Other

Informal Outline : 

Informal Outline Notes on Notes: 9/14/98 Uses of notes identify major points in a lecture identify minor points in a lecture 4 different notetaking systems: running text formal outline informal outline 2 kinds of format: Cornell Other

Cornell Note Format : 

Cornell Note Format Uses of notes identify major points identify minor points There are 4 Kinds of Notes: Running Text Formal Outline Informal Outline Cornell Note system Recall Column: Notes on Taking Notes, 9/14/03 Reduce ideas and facts to concise summaries and cues for reciting, reviewing and reflecting over here.

Other options for formats: : 

Other options for formats: Edit and summarize here Your reflections, ideas & questions here Class notes here Edit and summarize here Your reflections, ideas & questions here Class notes here

For example, notes may look something like this: : 

For example, notes may look something like this: Tip #2 Pick a notetaking system/format: - Running Text - Formal Outline - Informal Outline AND.. Pick a Format: - Cornell - Other

Slide 16: 

Tip #3 Communicate with your instructor.

Professors can see you... : 

Professors can see you... …even in big lecture classes! They tend to be warmest to those people who seem to be most communicative. Professors want you to be a thoughtful participant. Non-verbal communication Verbal communication in class questions (see next slide) out-of-class appointments

Ask questions in class : 

Ask questions in class Avoid irrelevant questions Maintain focus. Don’t ask a question about what was just said as if you weren’t paying attention Give your instructor a place to start. Preface what you don’t understand by what you do understand. Think of a question and ask it!

Slide 19: 

Tip #4 Avoid Distractions!

External Distractions : 

External Distractions windows/doors other class members seating choice temperature uncomfortable clothes noises

Internal Distractions : 

Internal Distractions speaker’s delivery (mannerisms/opinions) speaking rate vs. listening rate worries (the opposite of worrying is solving) negative self-talk

Negative Mental Dialog : 

Negative Mental Dialog So, who cares?! I’m never going to remember all of this. I should have never taken this class. I wonder what I will do after this class… What a stupid question! I wish I weren’t here.

Positive/Constructive Mental Dialog : 

Positive/Constructive Mental Dialog I am curious about this lecture. How does this relate to what I read for class? How does this relate to the last lecture? Why is this material in the lecture?

Tip #5 : 

Tip #5 Make your notes efficient and effective and listen for the essence of the lecture.

Effective Listeners & Ineffective Listeners : 

Effective Listeners & Ineffective Listeners Effective listeners. . . actively look for something of interest focus on content, not style listen for main ideas & their organization vary notetaking tools according to content work hard; maintain active body posture Ineffective listeners. . . tune out mentally judge the delivery listen for facts rather than main ideas/organization do not vary tools based on content. are passive mentally; give up easily

What do you see? : 

What do you see? You create the cube in your mind. You know it is there- even though all you see is a pattern.

Organizational Patterns : 

Organizational Patterns Introductory/Summary Located at the beginning or end of lecture Subject Development (definition/description) There is no question I can ask that can connect the relationship. e.g.: Roger, went to the game, wears a hat… the only connection is Roger. Enumeration/Sequence (lists/ordered lists) Cause/Effect (problem/solution) Comparison/Contrast

Instructor’s Signals : 

Instructor’s Signals writes on chalkboard repeats information speaks more slowly gives a definition lists a number of points/steps explains why or how things happen describes a sequence refers to information as a test item changes tone of voice uses body language uses visual aids refers to specific text pages

A Bad Example of Notes : 

A Bad Example of Notes A few tips... Record lecture date Do not cram space; use white space Don’t fall asleep Keep your personal thoughts separate Keep other class notes separate Do not use a spiral notebook History 1202 World War II Pearl Harbor bombing on Dec. 4 U.S. declared war ? US was not prepared after all but.. What are you doing tonight? bla! I am so bored! Who cares!!! 1:00 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00! I’m outa here! (2+4)-A =??? 2 duh

More Tips for Good Notes : 

More Tips for Good Notes Use a consistent format. Dvlp (develop) a key for symbols & abbreviations. Group and label info to aid recall. Record what is written on the board. Write legibly on only the front side of the page. Condense! Use shorthand NOT dictation. Selectively attend to instructor cues Look for patterns of organization Try to sustain attention

Notes : 

Notes taped (use to COMPLEMENT your notes. Set recorder at “0”, in your notes record #’s where you get lost.) borrowed (reflect the writer’s background.) commercial

Reviewing Notes: A Research Finding : 

Reviewing Notes: A Research Finding Students who reviewed within 1 hour after class... recalled 70-80% 48 hours later! (and you can maintain this kind of retention when you continue to review!)

Tip #6 : 

Tip #6 Transform raw notes into a finished product.

After-class Follow Through : 

After-class Follow Through Re-read notes ASAP look for patterns Fill in recall column with a word, phrase or question Fill in portions that you had to speed through and highlight Once/week review all your notes

Slide 35: 

Self Knowledge thoughts, values, emotions (focus of lecture) (pg. 41-44) understanding what we are feeling.. What is emotionally healthy?? A B C ‘s - Albert Ellis Activating Event, Belief (When you do something for someone, they owe you a “thank you”.), Emotional Consequence Our reaction to event depends on our assessment (beliefs) of the event. Emotional Health Life is like waves that keep rolling in To handle problems we need to: recognize them, accept them, and respond appropriately 9/11 Psychology Class, Ch.3, repeated Example of Raw Notes:

Slide 36: 

Self Knowledge emotions (focus of lecture) Albert Ellis- A B C ‘s of Emotion A = Activating Event B = Belief (When you do something for someone, they owe you a “thank you”.) C = Emotional Consequence Emotional Health The goal of life should NOT be waiting for problems to end. (waves example) To handle problems we need to: recognize them accept them respond appropriately thoughts values Recopied Notes Psych, Ch.3, 7/11/98 Example of Refined Notes: see pg. 41-44

Mapping : 

Mapping Notetaking Styles/Formats Running Text Formal Outline Modified Outline your own symbols Roman numerals paragraph

A Story Map : 

A Story Map Title Settings Characters Plot Name Problem Complications Conclusion Traits 1. 2. 3.

Another kind of map: : 

Another kind of map: Title Actor Action Scene of the Action Agency Purpose

Make it memorable : 

Make it memorable Murder in the U.S. Economic Conditions Murder Rates: Geographical Area

Chart Example : 

Chart Example

Slide 42: 

Tip #7 Review frequently and take responsibility for your own success.

Stop by any time… : 

Stop by any time… Student Support Services Trailer A 425-5235

Slide 44: 

Congratulations! You have now completed the Listening and Note taking Workshop Please Print this Page and Bring it to Student Support Services Trailer A for documentation or e-mail utcsss@utc.edu stating that you have completed this workshop