English (Dec.6) WE ARE FROM THE SHTETL

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Slide1:

“WE ARE FROM SHTETL” Jewish Folk Craft & Art Guild New York 2015 Moisey Frenkel, “The Jewish men”, fire drawing on the bark

Slide2:

THE JEWISH FOLK CRAFT AND ART GUILD PRESENTS A VIRTUAL EXHIBITION “WE ARE FROM SHTETL” Director of the exhibition: Yevgeniya Rozentsvit Artistic director: Isaak Vaynshelboym Author of the text: Yevgeniya Rozentsvit Slide presentation: Yevgeniya Rozentsvit , Leonid Grinberg Technical Director: Leonid Grinberg English text editors : Yuliya Grinberg , Wendy Grinberg Guild’s President: Ilya Nathanson Jewish Folk Craft and Art Guild 1876 East 19 Str., BSM Tel: 646-321-5220, 917-628-0706 - Yevgeniya Rozentsvit e-mail: folkshtetle@yahoo.com WEB: https://www.facebook.com/JewishArtGuild

About the Guild and The project “the Jewish Shtetl”:

About the Guild and The project “the Jewish Shtetl” The Jewish Folk Craft and Art Guild is a non-profit arts organization dedicated to providing opportunities for artistic and cultural exchanges and presenting quality art exhibitions and programs. Since 1999, the guild has run dozens of exhibitions, presenting hundreds of works in different media, including traditional wood carving, precious and semi-precious metals and stones, paintings, sculptures, stained glass, embroidery, photography, computer graphics and other media.

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In 2012, the Guild organized first Jewish Festival, “The Marathon of Memories” that included four events: an art exhibition “We are from Shtetl ”, a poetry and prose reading “We are 6000 Years Old,” a Jewish music concert, and a Jewish history film screening. The Guild takes a major interest in Jewish folk art. A key project of the Guild in this vein is “The Jewish Shtetl ,” started in 2001. Guild’s members’ artwork have been shown in more than 20 exhibitions with a positive reception, including such people as Bel Kaufman, Theodore Bikel , Zalman Mlotek .

virtual slide show “we are from shtetl” :

virtual slide show “we are from shtetl ” Virtually every Jew today has a mental image of the shtetl, the small village in which Jews lived for centuries in Eastern Europe. The shtetl has been a source of Jewish inspiration and creativity as well as major theme in Jewish art. Many great works of art portray the shtetl and life in it. We know about shtetl life from such great masters as Mark Chagall and Yehuda Pen. We have created our own program called “We are from Shtetl.” We are the direct descendants of the Jews who lived in shtetl.

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Our parents and relatives came from Jewish villages. They spoke Yiddish at home; their customs and way of life are reflected in shtetl life. From what has been passed down to us personally and collectively, such as in the works of the great Jewish writers Sholom Aleichem and Isaac Bashevis Singer, we have created our virtual shtetl . We’d like to introduce its characters to you. We have created it for our children so they may know about their roots.

Slide7:

The exhibition is comprised of the artwork created between the years 2000 -2015 by guild members, Jewish painters and masters from Brooklyn, New York. We will invite you to enter shtetl with us and live together with its inhabitants, pondering their lives and their foibles, sharing their misfortunes and happiness. Through our art we’ve tried to recreate a shtetl here and now, in America. In our show we will guide you through the all aspects of everyday life of Jewish people in a small village, in a shtetl.

The director of the program Yevgeniya Rozentsvit presenting her work to Theodore Bikel – the actor who has played “Tevye the Milkman “ :

The director of the program Yevgeniya Rozentsvit presenting her work to Theodore Bikel – the actor who has played “ Tevye the Milkman “

Members of the Guild, participating in their exhibition dedicated to the 150th birthday of Sholem Aleichem. Yevgeniya Rozentsvit and Leonid Grinberg introducing Bel Kaufman , the granddaughter of the great writer, to the exhibition. BnaI Zion, 2009:

Members of the Guild, participating in their exhibition dedicated to the 150 th birthday of Sholem Aleichem. Yevgeniya Rozentsvit and Leonid Grinberg introducing Bel Kaufman , the granddaughter of the great writer, to the exhibition. BnaI Zion, 2009

At the National Jewish Theatre “Folksbiene” show “Hershel of Ostropol” The artistic director of the theater, Zalmen Mlotek, is greeting a man who came from Ostropol, a painter and member of the Guild, Isaak Vaynshelboym:

At the National Jewish Theatre “Folksbiene” show “Hershel of Ostropol” The artistic director of the theater, Zalmen Mlotek, is greeting a man who came from Ostropol, a painter and member of the Guild, Isaak Vaynshelboym

Creators of The virtual slide show :

Creators of The virtual slide show 1 Rafael Akopov 2 Leonid Alaverdov 3 Regina Averbukh 4 Alla Baksanskaya 5 Matvey Basov 6 Inna Budovskaya 7 Svetlana Dizhur 8 Marina Falkov 9 Moisey Frenkel 10 Leonid Grinberg 11 Zinaida Kelebeyeva 12 Yelena Khazan 13 Yakov Kleynerman 14 Lucy Kotlyar 15 Lyudmila Leybovich 16 Vladimir Lobanov 17 Nikolay Mostovoy 18 Ilya Nathanson 19 Asya Oranskaya 20 Esfira Razin 21 Esfir Raykher 22 Rudolf Rozenblyum 23 Yevgeniya Rozentsvit 24 Ludmila Shamis 25 Mikhail Shapiro 26 Simon Shoykhet 27 Raisa Slobodov 28 Matvey Solovjev 29 Lazar Tarler 30 Yuri Tarler 31 Lev Tsitron 32 Nina Tsypina 33 Isaak Vaynshelboym 34 Freda Voroshilovskaya

the Journey home :

the Journey home The endless wandering and the eternal search for home has been the destiny of Jewish people, persecuted in many lands. In the sixteenth century, the Jews that were expelled from Spain found their refuge in Eastern Europe. They settled in small villages. For several centuries, shtetls became their home, the home of our ancestors. Such was their destiny! We, the generation of their grandchildren and great grandchildren, do not speak Yiddish, do not read Yiddish, do not think in Yiddish, but we feel in Yiddish and consider ourselves Jews of the shtetl.

Leonid Alaverdov, “Homeward” tapestry:

Leonid Alaverdov , “Homeward” tapestry

Leonid Grinberg, “Doorway” stained glass panel interpretation of michael korosti’s Watercolor:

Leonid Grinberg , “Doorway” stained glass panel interpretation of michael korosti’s Watercolor

The Fiddler ON THE ROOF:

The Fiddler ON THE ROOF As you enter our shtetl, the fiddler on the roof is greeting you. The fiddler on the roof is a symbol of the Jewish soul and the unshakable spirit of the shtetl. The soul is high, trying to break the fetters imposed by settlement. The settlement boarders were established by the Russian government, which carefully monitored its population. Only a very small percentage of the Jewish population could leave the shtetls to reside in large cities. Only the rich, the merchants or highly educated Jews of certain professions were allowed to move out. The Jews in the shtetl could only practice certain occupations like shopkeepers, carpenters, tailors and water carriers.

Marina Falkov, “Fiddler on the roof” canvas, acrylic:

Marina F alkov , “Fiddler on the roof” canvas, acrylic

VLadimir Lobanov,“Fiddler on the roof” PAPER, watercolor:

VLadimir Lobanov,“ Fiddler on the roof” PAPER, watercolor

Rafael Akopov, “Fiddler”, canvas, oil :

Rafael Akopov , “Fiddler ”, canvas, oil

Fiddlers on our roofs :

Fiddlers on our roofs Alla Baksanskaya mixed media Yevgeniya Rozentsvit CERAMIC

Sholem Aleichem:

Sholem Aleichem In the 1920s and 30s, the years following the Russian Revolution, Yiddish culture (its literature and visual art) experienced its renaissance. However, in the 1930-1940s, interest for it started to decline. The 1940s-1960s were the years of Stalin’s political repressions, when most Jewish artwork were destroyed, and Jewish artists and writers were exterminated. The only heritage we were left with were the books of Sholem Aleichem due to the endorsements of his work by the popular proletarian writer Maxim Gorky. In the post-war years of “the final solution to the Jewish question,” we knew very little about Jewish history and the shtetl that disappeared. Luckily, we could read Sholem Aleichem‘s books and feel that we were the Jews who came from shtetl.

Slide21:

We had the good fortune to meet Bel Kaufman, granddaughter of Sholem Aleichem, in New York. We invited her to the exhibition dedicated to the 150th birthday of Sholem Aleichem. Bel liked our shtetl . In 2009, during this memorable meeting at Bnai Zion Foundation, we presented her a portrait by guild member Rudolf Rozenblyum of her grandfather.

Zinaida Kelebeyeva “Story of SholEm Aleichem,” canvas, oil:

Zinaida Kelebeyeva “Story of SholEm Aleichem,” canvas, oil

SHTETL:

SHTETL As you enter Yiddish land, one of the thousands of little villages with its small houses with tile roofs, you might think it’s a regular village on the bank of a river with its market place, well, and cattle. There seems to be nothing special about it. But then you see that most of the inhabitants are Jews. The men are wearing kippas and tzitzit. The women cover their hair with special scarves; their dresses are long and opaque.

Asya Oranskaya, Shtetl “Piryatin” canvas, acrylic:

Asya Oranskaya , Shtetl “ Piryatin ” canvas, acrylic

Matvey Basov, “Shtetl” canvas, oil:

Matvey Basov, “ Shtetl ” canvas, oil ” on main street ” “friends”

matvey Basov, ”yiddish boy” canvas, oil:

matvey Basov, ” yiddish boy” canvas, oil

Slide27:

Isaak Vaynshelboym , shtetl “ ostropol ”, canvas, oil

Tevye, Traditions:

Tevye , Traditions For thousands of years, the Jewish shtetl preserved Jewish culture, language and religious traditions. Tevye, the main character of Sholem Aleichem’s novel “Tevye the Dairyman,” is perceived by us as the bearer of the tradition. He is the hard working “man of the Jewish shtetl” whose wisdom, simple life philosophy, love of family and humor resonated with millions of people around the world. Our exhibitions were praised by Theodore Bikel, an actor who played Tevye on Broadway. Yevgeniya Rozentsvit presented her work, a sculpture of Tevye, to the actor.

Isaak Vaynshelboym, “TevYe”, canvas, oil:

Isaak Vaynshelboym , “ TevYe ”, canvas, oil

Isaak Vaynshelboym, shtetl “Anatevka”, canvas, oil:

Isaak Vaynshelboym , shtetl “ Anatevka ”, canvas, oil

People of the Shtetl:

People of the Shtetl Life in the shtetl influenced the character traits of its people, positive and negative alike. Thus formed a specific Yiddish subculture based on religious traditions, economic hardship, and spirituality. Jews had their language, their customs, and their religion, but not their land and or autonomy. Music and humor helped Jews to live through the struggles of everyday life.

Marina Falkov, ”Shtetl”, canvas, acrylic:

Marina Falkov , ” Shtetl ”, canvas, acrylic

Y. Rozentsvit, “Jewish couples”, CERAMIC:

Y. Rozentsvit , “Jewish couples”, CERAMIC “Couple in Blue” “Couple in Pink”

Y. Rozentsvit, “TevYe and Golda”, cERAMIC, wood:

Y. Rozentsvit , “ TevYe and Golda”, cERAMIC , wood

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit, “In the morning” :

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit , “In the morning” “ Samovar”, CERAMIC ” breakfast” , cERAMMIC , wood

EsFir Raykher, “Old Shtetl”, canvas, oil:

EsFir Raykher , “Old Shtetl ”, canvas, oil

REBbE :

REBbE The rabbi, or “Rebbe” had absolute authority in the shtetls. He consulted villagers on both mundane and religious matters, taught in synagogues and yeshivot (religious schools). In the places our ancestors came from, the religious movement called Hasidism was popular. The Torah was the main source of knowledge and truth.

Rudolf Rozenblyum,“With Torah”, copper:

Rudolf Rozenblyum,“With Torah”, copper

Leonid Grinberg, “With Torah”, stained glass panel interpretation of michael korosti’s Watercolor:

Leonid Grinberg , “With Torah”, stained glass panel interpretation of michael korosti’s Watercolor

Leonid Alaverdov, “Hasidic Jew”, tapestry:

Leonid Alaverdov , “Hasidic Jew ”, tapestry

Simon Shoykhet,“Rebbe”, canvas, oil:

Simon Shoykhet,“Rebbe ”, canvas, oil

Leonid Grinberg,“12 Tribes”, stained glass panels:

Leonid Grinberg,“12 Tribes”, stained glass panels

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit, Yelena Khazan, “People with Rebbe”, cERAMIC, textile:

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit , Yelena Khazan , “People with Rebbe ”, cERAMIC , textile

Rudolf RoZenblYum, ”Old man”, pastel:

Rudolf RoZenblYum , ”Old man”, pastel

MATCHMAKING:

MATCHMAKING Weddings were major events in a shtetl and were looked upon very seriously. A matchmaker was an important person in the village. She knew all the potential brides and grooms in the neighborhood and could help to find a rich husband for an orphan or multiply the wealth of an already wealthy family. The well-being of the shtetl’s families depended on her.

Y. Rozentsvit, y. Khazan, “Matchmaking”, cERAMIC, textile :

Y. Rozentsvit , y. Khazan , “Matchmaking”, cERAMIC , textile matchmaker Grandmother and granddaughter

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit, “People on the roof”, ceramic Vase:

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit , “People on the roof”, ceramic Vase

The Jewish MOTHER:

The Jewish MOTHER A mother was the keeper of the family. The Jewish mother is considered very special, loving and caring. She took care of all the family members’ needs and made sure her kids were well fed and received a good education. The families had many children. Their mother’s love helped them to find their place in life. Characteristic of shtetl Jews and of Jews in general is the sacred love of their children and the desire to shelter them possible catastrophes and hardships of life.

Y. Rozentsvit, “Family”, CERAMIC:

Y. Rozentsvit , “Family”, CERAMIC Jewish mother Shlemazel

Ludmila leybovich, “mamele”, paper, acrylic:

Ludmila leybovich , “ mamele ”, paper, acrylic

Lyudmila Leybovich, “Treasure”, paper, acrylic:

Lyudmila Leybovich , “Treasure”, paper, acrylic

Craftsmen:

Craftsmen Jews of shtetl were craftsmen, masters of different trades. Some of these professions no longer exist, such as laundress or water carriers. These craftsmen were excellent masters who were able to make quality articles valued by European standards, as it “from Paris.”

Y. Rozentsvit, y. Khazan, ”Laundry”, CERAMIC, textile:

Y. Rozentsvit , y. Khazan , ”Laundry”, CERAMIC, textile

In the kitchen:

In the kitchen Y. Rozentsvit , y . Khazan cERAMIC , textile Y . Rozentsvit , CERAMIC

Leonid Grinberg, “Shoemaker”, stained glass panel interpretation of michael korosti’s Watercolor:

Leonid Grinberg , “Shoemaker”, stained glass panel interpretation of michael korosti’s Watercolor

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit, “Shoemaker”, cERAMIC:

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit , “Shoemaker”, cERAMIC

LUDMILA Leybovich,”tailor”, Paper, acrylic:

LUDMILA Leybovich,”tailor ”, Paper, acrylic

Tailors:

Tailors Yevgeniya Rozentsvit cERAMIC Vladimir Lobanov Oil ON PORCELAIN

Lev Tsitron,“TailoR”, wood burning:

Lev Tsitron,“TailoR ”, wood burning

Y. Rozentsvit, “Water carrier”, ceramic:

Y. Rozentsvit , “Water carrier”, ceramic

Y. Rozentsvit, y. Khazan, ceramic, textile, “bagel Seller”:

Y. Rozentsvit , y. Khazan , ceramic, textile, “bagel Seller”

The Market place:

The Market place The market place was a central attraction of the shtetl. You could find many products and goods there. It was a loud place, but they were also famous as a place to learn the news and local gossip. Another such popular place was the well, where mainly women would gather.

Raisa Slobodov 3D Collage from Y. Pan’s painting ”Market” :

Raisa Slobodov 3D Collage from Y. Pan’s painting ”Market”

Nikolay Mostovoy, canvas, oil, paraphrase from photograph Alter work ”Market place” :

Nikolay Mostovoy , canvas, oil, paraphrase from photograph Alter work ”Market place”

Jewish luck:

Jewish luck Jewish happiness was rare in the hard life of a shtetl. It was viewed as a reward for hard work and a blessing. In critical moments of life, Jewish humor made things easier. Sometimes sarcastic, but also kind, it was way to laugh about their difficult situation. Tears and laughter often went hand to hand. What else was there for a poor Jew?    

Yevgeniya Rozentsvt, “Jewish luck”, cERAMIC, wood:

Yevgeniya Rozentsvt , “Jewish luck”, cERAMIC , wood

HOLIDAYs:

HOLIDAYs Musicians who played Jewish   music (klezmer), played an essential part in happy as well as not so happy occasions in the shtetl. Village orchestras were small, but they played tender and passionate Jewish music. Klezmer music is now listened to and loved by many people in the world. Jews are able to laugh and cry simultaneously, remaining optimistic and hoping for a better life in the future!  

Slide68:

Isaak Vaynshelboym , ” Klezmers ,” canvas, oil

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MIKHAIL Shapiro, ” Klezmers ”, wood carwing

Yuri Tarler,“Holidays”, canvas, oil:

Yuri Tarler,“Holidays ”, canvas, oil

Rudolf rozenblum, “Sukkot”, paper, pencil:

Rudolf rozenblum , “ Sukkot ”, paper, pencil

The Dance:

The Dance Asiya Oranskaya ,” freilich ”, canvas, acrylic Svetlana Dizhur,” hasidic dance ”, canvas, oil

Vladimir Lobanov, “ 7/40”, oil on porcelain:

Vladimir Lobanov , “ 7/40”, oil on porcelain

Leonid Alaverdov, ”Hava nagila”, tapestry:

Leonid Alaverdov , ” Hava nagila ”, tapestry

Vladimir Lobanov, ”sounds of music”, oil on porcelain:

Vladimir Lobanov , ”sounds of music”, oil on porcelain

Ritual Items:

Ritual Items In addition to regular household items, Jewish craftsmen also produced refined art for holiday use and decoration. They put their souls and their skills into them. They utilized the materials that were available to them: wood, metals and clay. Their mastery allowed them to make unique things.

Candlesticks, wood:

Candlesticks, wood ilya Nathanson Yakov kleynerman

Raisa Slobodov,”Necklace”, beads:

Raisa Slobodov,”Necklace ”, beads

Matvey Solovjev, Nina Tsypina, “Menorah”, Mixed media:

Matvey Solovjev , Nina Tsypina , “Menorah”, Mixed media

Matvey Solovjev, Nina Tsypina, Chess set “Dreidels”, Mixed media:

Matvey Solovjev , Nina Tsypina , Chess set “ Dreidels ”, Mixed media

Regina Averbukh, Mixed media :

Regina Averbukh , Mixed media “ Old Jewish man” “ baba Luba ”

Leonid Grinberg, Holidays ”hanukKah”, stained glass panel:

Leonid Grinberg , Holidays ” hanukKah ”, stained glass panel

Ludmila Shamis, dry straw:

Ludmila Shamis , dry straw “ Roses” “MENORAH”

Alla Baksanskaya,“For kids” seashells, mixed media:

Alla Baksanskaya,“For kids” seashells, mixed media

Alla BaksanskAya, ”clocks,” seashells:

Alla BaksanskAya , ”clocks,” seashells M. Solovjev , N. Tsypina , “ hamsah hand,” seashells

Lucy Kotlyar,”Noah’s ark”, collage:

Lucy Kotlyar,”Noah’s ark”, collage

WE HAVE TO LEAVE:

Jewish shtetls flourished from the eighteenth to the nineteenth century. With the Industrial Age, the economy changed. Once well-to-do shtetls became impoverished. On top of this, anti-Semitism intensified. Widely supported by the Russian government, pogroms increased. The Jews had no choice – they had to leave in order to survive, to find peace in another country and have the opportunity to raise their children. “We must leave! We must leave!” A wave of immigration at the beginning of the twentieth century brought thousands of Jews from the shtetls to the United States and other countries. They were poor people. A lot of people settled in certain neighborhoods of New York. WE HAVE TO LEAVE

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit, CERAMIC, “We have to leave!”:

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit , CERAMIC, “We have to leave!”

Leonid grinberg, “motele”, stained glass panel interpretation of david silverman’s book illustration:

Leonid grinberg , “ motele ”, stained glass panel interpretation of david silverman’s book illustration

The Holocaust:

The Holocaust A small part of our exhibition is dedicated to the theme of the Holocaust. Contrary to the depiction of peaceful life in the shtetl, the paintings on the Holocaust are indignant about the ruined lives of the people. These paintings are bleeding together with those who went through unimaginable suffering and found the strength and will to support others when all hope was lost. The Holocaust is our pain. We have been living with it for many years. We have not overcome it! It will stay with us for a long time. The mass murder of the Jews on the basis that they were Jews has not only inflicted irreparable loss on the Jewish people, it has also morally impoverished all of humanity. The fact that this genocide was allowed creates a precedent for global anti-Semitism and a revival of Nazi philosophy in our times.

Isaak Vaynshelboym, ”Last song”, canvas, oil:

Isaak Vaynshelboym , ”Last song”, canvas, oil

Isaak Vaynshelboym, canvas, oil , ”Huppa in the Ghetto,” :

Isaak Vaynshelboym , canvas, oil , ” Huppa in the Ghetto,”

Isaak Vaynshelboym,”Rebbetzin,” canvas, oil:

Isaak Vaynshelboym ,” Rebbetzin ,” canvas, oil

Isaak Vaynshelboym, ”Praying” canvas, oil :

Isaak Vaynshelboym , ”Praying” canvas, oil

Asya Oranskaya, “Holocaust”, canvas, acrylic:

Asya Oranskaya , “Holocaust”, canvas, acrylic

Asya Oranskaya, “Babi Yar”, canvas, acrylic:

Asya Oranskaya , “ Babi Yar ”, canvas, acrylic

Asya Oranskaya, canvas, acrylic, ”MY PAIN - Babi Yar”:

Asya Oranskaya , canvas, acrylic, ”MY PAIN - Babi Yar ”

Freda Voroshilovskaya, leather,   “Hell on Earth“, :

Freda Voroshilovskaya , leather,   “ Hell on Earth“,

Asia Oranskaya,“Peace”, Canvas, acrylic:

Asia Oranskaya,“Peace ”, Canvas, acrylic

esFir Raykher, “Memory”, canvas, oil:

esFir Raykher , “Memory”, canvas, oil

Lazar Tarler, paper, ink, “Memorial in miami” , by sculptor kennet treister (2004) :

Lazar Tarler , paper, ink, “Memorial in miami ” , by sculptor kennet treister (2004)

In the United States of America :

In the United States of America In the United States, the country that accepted us and granted us all human rights, we’ve settled largely in Brooklyn, New York. We are now able to educate our children. The Russian-Jewish community is making a large contribution to the economic and cultural development of our city. We love New York and participate in its life. Happy and tragic events resonate deeply in our hearts. We, the Russian Jews who have survived the Holocaust, are ready to engage in a constructive dialogue with people of other ethnic groups to prevent any forms of terrorism and possible aggression in the future. Our art vividly demonstrates our desire to live in peace!

esFira Razin, “ 9/11”, canvas, oil :

esFira Razin , “ 9/11”, canvas, oil

Leonid grinberg, “Tribute to 9/11”, stained glass panel :

Leonid grinberg , “Tribute to 9/11”, stained glass panel

Alla Baksanskaya, ”forever in our hearts”, seashells:

Alla Baksanskaya , ”forever in our hearts”, seashells

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit, clay, ”Brighton for us”:

Yevgeniya Rozentsvit , clay, ”Brighton for us”

Inna Budovskaya, “Simchat Torah on the boardwalk”, paraphrase of Samuel kaplan paintings , canvas, acrylic:

Inna Budovskaya , “ Simchat Torah on the boardwalk”, paraphrase of Samuel kaplan paintings , canvas, acrylic

Leonid Alaverdov, tapestry:

Leonid Alaverdov , tapestry New York, town of three Religions Dance in Borough Park

Slide109:

Ludmila Shamis , dry straw « STATUE OF LIBERTY »

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Project Director: Yevgeniya Rozentsvit Project Art Director: Isaak Vaynshelboym Design: Yevgeniya Rozentsvit , Leonid Grinberg English text editors : Yuliya Grinberg , Wendy Grinberg Guild President: Ilya Nathanson Jewish Folk Craft and Art Guild 1876 East 19 Str., BSM Tel: 646-321-5220, 917-628-0706 – Yevgeniya Rozentsvit e-mail: folkshtetle@yahoo.com WEB: https://www.facebook.com/JewishArtGuild New York , 2015

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