feeding children

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Feeding Young Children and Physical Activities for Families: 

Feeding Young Children and Physical Activities for Families Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Obesity Facts 1 of every 7 children in the United States is overweight: 

Obesity Facts1 of every 7 children in the United States is overweight 13% of children age 6–11 are overweight 14% of children age 12–19 are overweight Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Slide 3: 

Goal of Parent/Child Feeding Relationship and Physical Activity Relationship Parent eating and activity behaviors and child feeding practices assist the child in achieving autonomy that includes healthy eating, balanced by activity. Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Children’s Responsibilities Child’s responsibility in the feeding relationship: 

Children’s ResponsibilitiesChild’s responsibility in the feeding relationship Decide whether or not to eat Decide how much to eat Grow the way nature . . . and his/her genetics . . . intend Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

A Newborn’s Feeding Sign Language: 

A Newborn’s Feeding Sign Language Signs of hunger Fussing or fidgeting during sleep Sucking on the tongue or lips during sleep Moving the arms and hands toward the mouth Turning the head from side to side Signs of fullness Falling asleep Relaxing the body Opening the fists and relaxing the forehead Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Avoid Choking Older baby is still learning to chew and swallow Not all gagging is choking Avoid foods that can block the windpipe: 

Avoid ChokingOlder baby is still learning to chew and swallowNot all gagging is chokingAvoid foods that can block the windpipe Round, slippery foods like grapes and hot dogs Large pieces of food and hard foods (nuts, raw vegetables, candies, popcorn) Sticky foods like peanut butter Cut foods into appropriate shapes Do not leave a child unsupervised while he/she is eating Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Myths and Facts Myth: Babies need water. Fact: Healthy infants do not need extra water. Breast milk or formula provides all the fluid they need. Myth: Starting solids early will help a baby sleep through the night. Fact: There is no connection between consumption of solid food and night sleeping.: 

Myths and FactsMyth: Babies need water.Fact: Healthy infants do not need extra water. Breast milk or formula provides all the fluid they need.Myth: Starting solids early will help a baby sleep through the night.Fact: There is no connection between consumption of solid food and night sleeping. Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Trust vs. Mistrust You should have lines drawn through 2 – 5 – 7 – 12 – 14 : 

Trust vs. MistrustYou should have lines drawn through2 – 5 – 7 – 12 – 14 Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Toddlers: Myths and Facts Myth: If toddlers eat a snack between lunch and dinner, they won’t have room for dinner. Fact: Toddlers’ tummies are small, and they need to eat frequently in order to consume enough food to meet energy needs. Myth: A low-fat diet is as appropriate for toddlers as it is for adults. Fact: Children up to age 2 should get about half their daily calories from fat. After that, fat can be gradually cut down until about 30–35% of calories come from fat. Myth: Toddlers can drink unlimited amounts of milk and juice. Fact: Toddlers need nutrients from foods that are not in milk and juice.: 

Toddlers: Myths and FactsMyth: If toddlers eat a snack between lunch and dinner, they won’t have room for dinner.Fact: Toddlers’ tummies are small, and they need to eat frequently in order to consume enough food to meet energy needs.Myth: A low-fat diet is as appropriate for toddlers as it is for adults.Fact: Children up to age 2 should get about half their daily calories from fat. After that, fat can be gradually cut down until about 30–35% of calories come from fat.Myth: Toddlers can drink unlimited amounts of milk and juice.Fact: Toddlers need nutrients from foods that are not in milk and juice. Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Autonomy vs. Shame/Doubt You should have lines drawn through 4 – 6 – 7 – 9 – 12 – 13 : 

Autonomy vs. Shame/DoubtYou should have lines drawn through4 – 6 – 7 – 9 – 12 – 13 Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Initiative vs. Guilt You should have lines drawn through 1 – 5 – 7 – 9 – 11 – 12 – 15 : 

Initiative vs. GuiltYou should have lines drawn through1 – 5 – 7 – 9 – 11 – 12 – 15 Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Parent Responsibilities in the Feeding Relationship: 

Parent Responsibilities in the Feeding Relationship Make mealtimes pleasant and calm Model healthy eating Select and buy foods Make meals and snacks Provide a regular time and place where eating occurs Present food in an age-appropriate manner Provide eating helps Provide participation in preparing family meals Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

School-age Children: Myths and Facts Myth: Sugar causes excessive activity or restlessness in children (sometimes called hyperactivity). Fact: There is no research evidence that sugar influences behavior. Myth: Additives such as colored dyes and preservatives influence behavior. Fact: Research remains inconclusive. Special diets have not consistently improved children’s symptoms. : 

School-age Children: Myths and FactsMyth: Sugar causes excessive activity or restlessness in children (sometimes called hyperactivity).Fact: There is no research evidence that sugar influences behavior.Myth: Additives such as colored dyes and preservatives influence behavior.Fact: Research remains inconclusive. Special diets have not consistently improved children’s symptoms. Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Industry vs. Inferiority You should have lines drawn through 3 – 4 – 8 – 9 : 

Industry vs. InferiorityYou should have lines drawn through3 – 4 – 8 – 9 Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Eating and Weight Issues of Concern during the Teen Years: 

Eating and Weight Issues of Concern during the Teen Years Dramatic weight loss or gain Sudden interest or preoccupation with food, calories, body weight, or size Compulsive or obsessive exercising Wears oversized clothing Visits the restroom immediately after meals Develops food rituals—food jags Avoids social occasions that involve food Appears moody or depressed Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Identity vs. Role Confusion You should have lines drawn through 1 – 4 – 6 – 10  : 

Identity vs. Role ConfusionYou should have lines drawn through1 – 4 – 6 – 10 Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002

Role of Parent Educators: 

Role of Parent Educators Be aware of the considerable capabilities of children to actively participate in feeding. Be skilled at alerting parents to the natural progression that children go through in accumulating eating and physical activity skills. Be aware of the parent or child characteristics that can affect the feeding relationship. Be sensitive to the support children require from parents to do well in eating and activity. Partnering with Parents SP 175 VII July 2002