RWEI 2011 - Federal Wind Energy Policy

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Christy Omohundro, American Wind Energy Association, presented on federal wind energy policy at the fourth annual Southern Appalachian Regional Wind Energy Institute meeting in Washington, D.C. October 26, 2011. Details can be viewed at www.regionalwind.org. RWEI is a project of the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy - www.cleanenergy.org.

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2011 RWEI Annual Meeting :

2011 RWEI Annual Meeting Christy Omohundro Regional Representative, East American Wind Energy Association

American Wind Energy Association (AWEA):

American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) Founded in 1974 More than 2,500 business members Wind project developers Transportation and construction companies Manufacturers from bolts to turbines More than 8,000 parts in a turbine www.AWEA.org provides extensive info on wind

AWEA’s Regional Partners:

AWEA’s Regional Partners Data Sources: AWEA , U.S. DOE 20% Wind Energy by 2030

Wind Power Offers Price Stability:

Wind Power Offers Price Stability Known pricing can offer hedge against fuel price volatility risk Electricity from wind is inflation-proof once wind farm is operating Zero-emissions profile of wind helps hedge again carbon price risk

Wind Power Offers Fuel Diversity:

Wind Power Offers Fuel Diversity Domestic energy source Inexhaustible supply Complement to natural gas Wind has variable generation output, but no fuel cost and a stable price over the life of the project Natural gas has stable generation output, but volatile cost due to fuel input

CO2 Reductions From Electricity Sector:

CO 2 Reductions From Electricity Sector Source: U.S. DOE, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, 2008 0 2006 2010 2014 2018 2022 2026 2030 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 3,500 4,000 4,500 No New Wind Scenario CO 2 emissions 20% Wind Scenario CO 2 emissions USCAP path to 80% below today’ s levels by 2050 Wind Power Emits No Pollution

Wind Power Uses No Water:

Wind Power Uses No Water 20% wind avoids the consumption of 4 trillion gallons of water cumulatively through 2030 20% wind cuts electric sector water consumption by 17% in 2030 Source: U.S. DOE, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, 2008

Slide 8:

Wind Power is Cost-Competitive Levelized Cost of Energy, $ per MWh Source: Lazard, June 2009.

Slide 9:

Data Source: Energy Information Administration, April 2008 Snapshot of Federal Energy Incentives

Increase in Wind Turbine Productivity:

Increase in Wind Turbine Productivity Technology has continued to improved with taller towers, larger rotors, increased turbines availability, and better siting technology to achieve increased capacity factors. This improved performance translates into a turbine with a nameplate capacity 7 times larger than a typical turbine in 1990, can produce 15 times more electricity. Source: AWEA U.S. Wind Industry Annual Market Report Year Ending 2010

U.S. Wind Power Capacity Installations by State in 2010 (MW):

U.S. Wind Power Capacity Installations by State in 2010 (MW) 38 states have utility-scale wind installations. 14 states have more than 1,000 MW installed. Source: AWEA U.S. Wind Industry Annual Market Report Year Ending 2010

All Online Wind-Related Manufacturing Facilities:

All Online Wind-Related Manufacturing Facilities At the end of 2010, there were over 400 manufacturing facilities online making wind-related products. The online facilities span 42 states Source: AWEA U.S. Wind Industry Annual Market Report Year Ending 2010

U.S. Wind Industry Jobs by State:

U.S. Wind Industry Jobs by State Of the 75,000 jobs across the wind industry, Texas ranked No.1 with the largest amount of new capacity in 2010, energy-hub and offices in Houston and strong manufacturing across the state. Illinois took the No. 2 spot with strong 2010 installations and growing manufacturing base. With the recent heaving manufacturing investment in Colorado, the state ranked No. 3 in terms of wind jobs. Source: AWEA U.S. Wind Industry Annual Market Report Year Ending 2010

2012 Strategy Components:

2012 Strategy Components Issues fall into the following four categories : (1) Market – driving demand and defending established markets (state RPS) (2) Operational – transmission/integration costs (3) Siting (4) Taxation (i.e., how will we be taxed – revenue streams to counties/states)

2012 Strategy Components:

2012 Strategy Components Audiences. While the state policy team coordinates with AWEA’s federal policy, regulatory and siting teams to implement a broad suite of polices at the regional and state level, the state team’s focus is on work with state governors and energy offices, legislators and public utility commissions. Legislative outreach : AWEA can augment the work of regional partners in key states. Tier 1: Illinois, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, New Jersey, California, Oregon, Washington, Colorado Tier 2: Missouri, Indiana, Wisconsin, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Wyoming, Montana, Utah, Nevada Governors Regulatory outreach

Expanded Southeast Focus:

Expanded Southeast Focus WINDPOWER 2012 in Atlanta – June 3-6 Impact of new technology in turbines and blades Development activity in Southeastern states

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