Vegetation of Little Cayman

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Vegetation of Little Cayman: 

Vegetation of Little Cayman © M. Anderson

To the reader:: 

To the reader: This is a work in progress, please view it as such. If you have any knowledge of Central Caribbean tropical flora, please feel free to help with suggestions, corrections, or filling in the missing sections. The next vegetative field survey of this island will be in June/ July ’05. Please e-mail me with any information that you are willing to share. Thank-you

Vegetation Overview : 

Vegetation Overview Both the geology and rainfall patterns on Little Cayman are the major determining factors of what vegetative community exists where. The prevailing wind carries the cloud masses over the center of the island. Convection rain ‘hot spots’ occur towards the west of the central mangrove swamps. The eastern end of Little Cayman displays signs of significantly less rainfall than the central and west-central portions. Roughly the center portion of the island.

Vegetation Overview: 

Vegetation Overview Vegetative patterns indicate that there is a central precipitation ‘hot spot’ on Little Cayman from Tarpon Lake through to Boobie Pond. The eastern end of the island has generally low scrub vegetation including numerous xerophytes and drought tolerant species. Mangrove swamps are patchy and few on the east end. Low scrub on the eastern end of the island.

Vegetation Overview: 

Vegetation Overview As you trend west, the number of swamps and associated wet-site vegetation becomes significantly more prominent. This trend decreases slightly at the western tip of the island where the exposed ironshore, storms and sea salt may play a limiting factor to the tolerances of many types of vegetation. Swamps and wet-site vegetation in the center and west –center of the island.

Vegetation Overview: 

Vegetation Overview The vegetation of the low eastern swampy areas are in low in height and characteristic of arid tropical climates. At the same general elevation in the central and west-central areas, mangrove swamps are dominant, a group of species intolerant of arid conditions. Mangrove swamps.

Vegetative Communities: 

Vegetative Communities Dry, Tropical Woodland Interior Mangrove Swamp Coastal Mangroves Beaches, Berms; Coastal Communities

Inland, Dry Evergreen on Limestone Communities: 

Inland, Dry Evergreen on Limestone Communities Dry evergreen Forests Dry Evergreen Woodlands Dry Evergreen Thickets Dry Evergreen Bushlands.

Dry, Tropical Woodland: 

Dry, Tropical Woodland Site 1: West End Benchmark Site 4: Blue Sky Road Site 7: Gazebo Lane Site 17: Calabash Site 18: Snipes Point Site 30: Ridge @ New Airport Road Site 41: Walter’s Dock Inland fields Date: July 29th, 2002 Geology:The surface had little soil or detritus and was hard and irregular.

Dry, Tropical Woodland: 

Dry, Tropical Woodland Site 1: The plants in the cleared area in front of the treeline fall into the dry bushland category. The woodland became impenetrable within a few meters of the treeline, resembling dry evergreen thicket, but a survey of the trees on both sides of the roadcut gave a good representative sample.

Bitter plum: 

Bitter plum Picrodendron baccatum Black Ironwood, Wild Plum, Jamaica Walnut Large tree with spreading crown Oak-like gray bark, deeply fissured in vertical lines shredding in long, thin strips toward bottom; Leaves opposite; leaflets in 3’s Green plums ripen to bright orange

Red Birch: 

Red Birch Bersera simaruba Cinnamon red peeling bark, reveals greenish tint underneath Sticky, aromatic resinous sap Lenticles on large, smooth branches, especially at bends tree 10 – 15’ tall Small yellow flowers produce dark red fruits

Broadleaf: 

Broadleaf Cordia sebestena var. caymanensis Tall, thin tree with narrow, sparse crown. Bark on mature trees becomes corky with deep vertical furrows & horizontal cracks. Huge, sandpaper leaf, to 30cm long, opposite veins, serrate; White Italian-pepper-like 1.5” fruit; clusters of trumpet-like orange flowers

Dogwood: 

Dogwood Piscidia piscipula (Legume) Pink blooms in Jan. followed by papery seed pods. Compound leaves are clustered together. 7 to 9 leaflets, with a prominent central veins. Smooth bark often colonized by gray, lt. green and black lichens.

Headache Bush: 

Headache Bush Capparis cynophallophora Small tree, dense even canopy Leaves glossy, dark green and pale silvery green below, matted with tiny scales on the undersides.Young stems and leaf stalks are also clothed with tiny scales Young leaves begin developing while folded tightly in half Young bark is thin, firm and brown, older trees are colonized by green and brown lichens Older bard splits in narrow vertical cracks Flowers white and pale purple with long stamens. Bean pod fruits with bright red interior and black seeds.

Ironwood: 

Ironwood Gymnanthes lucida Crab-bush Narrow, 3 types of plastic leaves: pointy, notched and rounded tips; Young foliage is reddish, older leaves are shiny and hard (plastic) silvery exfoliating bark exposes brown patches underneath. Colonized by colorful lichens. woody drupes, 2cm on long stalks.

Indian Almond: 

Indian Almond Terminalia catappa Large, rough, fig-like leaf, grows in tight clusters at the end of each twig Large smooth green nut ripens to yellow; Tomentose underside of leaf. Older tree bark has irregular horizontal and vertical cracks, often pitted with sapsucker holes.

Indian Mulbay : 

Indian Mulbay Annona murrcarta “Soursop” Flowers solitary, 1.5cm long, 6 petals Green fruit asymmetrical, up to 20cm long, covered w/ curved, flexible spines, black edible seeds. Young branchlets clothed in red hairs Leaves oblong-obovate, 8 –15cm long

Wild Jasmine: 

Wild Jasmine Mottled white bark with orange and light gray lichen colonies; Flat twigs with clusters at their ends; rhododendron-like form leaf with alternate veins; Very sappy; white flower; Very fragrant; multi-trunk; 12’ tall Wild: grows on dry rocky terrain; Plumeria obtusa

Jasmine: 

Jasmine Frangipani Very similar to and often mistaken for wild Jasmine. planted in graveyards and gardens

Logwood: 

Logwood Haematoxylum campechianum Small, thorny tree Shrub with stout, short spines; Compound leaf, 1” leaflets opposite and heart-shaped Trunk deeply furrowed with rough, shedding bark Brilliant yellow scented flowers in clusters in Jan. Long pale yellow seed pods ripen to brown.

Manchaneel tree : 

Manchaneel tree Hippomane mancinella Milks sap is poisionous to touch Little green apples; Compound leaves, opposite leaflets Pale brown, grooved trunk with erratic vertical fissures and small horizontal cracks, often with pink and gray lichens.

Snakewood: 

Snakewood Colobrina elliptica Tomentose, reddish brown fur on young stems and mid-vein on leaf undersides, Yellow / green inconspicuous flower; Seed pods with glossy black seeds. Gray bark with vertical cracks, exfoliating in flakes on older trees

Tamarind: 

Tamarind Tamarindus indica Legume with weeping habit, often found with seed pods still hanging from previous year. Pale, yellow flowers with petals flushed orange and red veins. Bark is firm, brown with dense vertical ribbing, older trunks exfoliate flakes.

Wild Fig: 

Wild Fig Ficus-like tree; dbh @ 36” Leaves entire. Small fleshy globose fruit at base of leaf. Wild figs are not stalked and grow directly on stem. Milky white sap within leaf Roots tangle over rocks and around neighboring trees, producing multiple trunks. Smooth, pale bark, often colonized by colorful lichens. Vertical rows of lenticles on bark. Ficus aurea

Wild Cocoplum: 

Wild Cocoplum Savia erythroxyloides Opposite, rounded, leathery leaves; 2-7cm, sometimes notched; White apple-like fruit. Exfoliating dark bark colonized by sooty and dark green lichens and mosses. Grows in rocky thickets near water table.

Whitewood : 

Whitewood Tabebuia heterophylla Small tree; Showy, pinkish-purple flowers, Opposite, compound, leaflets in 5’s; yellow stems and midribs. Tall narrow, straight trunk with deep vertical fissures. Only native tree with 5 leaflets radiating from the stalk of each leaf.

Pepper cinnamon: 

Pepper cinnamon Canella winterana Bark strongly aromatic. Pebbly. Bark is textured by shallow vertical fissures, older trees exfoliating. Often colonized by colorful lichens. Long laurel-like leaf; woody twigs; Leaf tastes peppery when crushed. Brilliant red flowers Aromatic, red berries.

Mahogany: 

Mahogany Swietenia mahagoni Grows to 10m tall. Compound leaves evenly pinnate, mostly in 4 pairs, with no terminal leaf. Leaflets are entire, unequal sided at base, 3-6cm long. Flower panicles much shorter than leaves. Hard brown 6cm long seed.

Giant Agave: 

Giant Agave Sobolifera sp. Aloe-like succulent at tree line; 7 – 10’ tall, leaves to 1.5m; (Proctor: p. 241-2, Unable to key; CI species needs further study)

Duppy Basil: 

Duppy Basil Phyllanthus angustifolia Shrub; 2’tall; succulent-like foliage; tiny white or red flower; Tufts in leaf notches woody stem; alternate leaves; smells like basil.

Dodder: 

Dodder Cassytha filiformis Old man berry; Twining parasitic herb.

Dodder: 

Dodder Cassytha filiformis Yellow or greenish stems, freely branching, up to 4m long, sometimes matted. Few 1-2mm long scales are actually reduced leaves. White flowers, 2mm; Globose white 6mm fruits.

Bayvine: 

Bayvine Ipomoea pes-caprae Ground cover; morning glory-like flower; Rounded, notched leaf; vine; creeper

Bull thatch: 

Bull thatch Thrinax radiata Small, palmate palm, growing up to 20’. Undersides of leaves are green. Green berries ripen to white. Large leaf scars on trunk. Grows on dry outcrops, sandy beach ridges.

Cacti: 

Cacti Harrisia gracilis Columnar, to 7m tall, erect cacti at tree line; occurring on exposed limestone rocks. Ribs rounded, grooves shallow, areoles with 6-10 or more needle-like spines of varying length from .5-3cm. Floer buds enveloped in wool. Fruits globose, yellow 5cm in diameter.

Box Candlewood: 

Box Candlewood Erithalis fructicosa Boxwood like shrub, 3 – 5’ tall; leathery elliptic to rotund leaf, leaf 2.5 – 6.5cm; tiny Queen Anne’s Lace – like white flowers

Catrat: 

Catrat

Cockspur: 

Cockspur Caesalpinia bondu Prickly shrub / vine; thorns everywhere. Compound leaves with 12 opposite, oval leaflets. Dry woodlands over limestone.

Orchid: 

Orchid Epidendrum sp. Banana orchids (need flower for species ID)

Orchid: 

Orchid Banana Orchid on Buttonwood tree

Strumpfia: 

Strumpfia Strumpfia maritima 4-5’ Flat topped or mounded low shrub; leaves glossy upper and yellow undersides sandpaper (tomentose); pine scent, coarse branching leaves 1-2.5 cm long, 1-3mm wide.

Wild sage: 

Wild sage Lantana camara Spiraea-like shrub; russet color leaves; magenta to purple colored berries at apex; orange flowers in clusters; leaves textured, opposite or whorled, rough and serrate

Bull hoof /Cow foot: 

Bull hoof /Cow foot Bauhinia divaricata Small tree/shrub. Hoof shaped leaf. pink & white flowers with very long stamen. Blooms 2x/yr. Slender, strong trunk with deeply deeply fissured brown bark. Bark often found with parasitic flowers(Pilostyles globosa) which appear as pimples on the bark.

Ambrosia / Wormwood: 

Ambrosia / Wormwood Ambrosia hispida Ambrosia-like rag weed

Washwood: 

Washwood Jacquinia proctorii Shrub; 5’ tall. Huge clusters of green fruits mature to bright orange berries. Pale gray twigs on crooked branches. leaves obovate, 1.5 – 4 cm long; Fragrant yellow flowers.

Silver Thatch: 

Silver Thatch Coccothrinax proctorii “Tatch” Fan-leafed palm; 2 – 5m tall. Leaf blades orbicular with 39-48 segments, most are 61 – 80 cm long. Segment tips are connected by a thread-like strand. Leaf undersides are silver to golden. (distinguishing it from other thatch sp.) Flowers on stalked inflourescense with 5-7 primary branches are fragrant and white turning creamy. Green fruit ripens to red/ black. Brown trunk usually colonized by gray, lt. Green, orange and yellow lichens. Trunk surface split by vertical grooves. Unique to the Cayman Islands.

Suriana: 

Suriana

Slide49: 

Low mimosa-like vine / groundcover 10 – 16 opposite leaflets; terminal leaflet; yellow flower with pale inside

Unidentified: 

Unidentified

Mangrove Communities: 

Mangrove Communities Coastal mangroves Mangroves of coastal ponds and sand flats Inland mangroves Herbaceous swamp

Coastal Mangroves: 

Coastal Mangroves Coastal mangroves, occur in South Hole Sound (Site 41), Owen Island (Site 42) and headlands in Bloody Bay. This mangrove consists of Avincenna and Rhizophora. Above Mangroves in South Hole Sound (Photos: Terry 8/02)

Coastal Pond Mangrove Communities: 

Coastal Pond Mangrove Communities The next group of mangroves occupy the extensive series of linear ponds that are located between the ridges and the limestone uplands to the interior of the island. They are shallow and have a rock floor covered with varying degrees of sediment. Blossom Village Pond, site 39, and Pirates Point, site 26 have only scattered Avicennia, Laguncularia and Conocarpus. Other sites, such as Tarpon Lake, sites 23 and 24, have an tall expanse of Avicennia, Laguncularia, some Conocarpus and Rhizophora.

Inland Mangroves: 

Inland Mangroves Inland mangroves sit atop the Bluff Limestone in the interior of the island. They differ from other mangrove communities in that they have much denser root systems and smaller leaves. The trees are also considerably more prostrate than the coastal variety. The species are still the same, however Rhizophora dominates. Shrub species such as Erithalis, Strumpfia and other pioneers are sometimes found at the edges of these mangroves.

Herbaceous Swamp Community: 

Herbaceous Swamp Community Located at the east end of Little Cayman and inland, this swamp sits at sea level and is surrounded by limestone ridges 2 – 4m high. There are ridges and pinnacles of dissected Bluff Limestone poking through it. It was a very low growing, prostate community, with most plants appearing to be no more than 1m tall.

Interior Mangrove Swamp : 

Interior Mangrove Swamp Site:3: West Indian Whistling Duck Pond Site 6: Booby Pond Observation Deck Site 8: Olivine Kirk Road Valley Site 11: Jackson Pond Observation Deck Site 14: Cork Landing Area Site 15: Bird Observation Site, Crawl Bay Site 19: Muddy Foots on Guy Banks Road Site 20: Southeast Shoreline Site 23: Tarpon Lake Walkway Site 26: Preston Point Pond Site 27: Pirates Point Inland Site 31: Down Rubble Road Site 39 Base House Pond Date: July 29-31, 2002 White, red and black mangroves are the main species in the interior Little Cayman Island mangrove swamps. As one trends inward, the white mangrove dominates.

Interior Mangrove Swamp: 

Interior Mangrove Swamp A wetlands/pond habitat with black mangrove. The acrid smell, is most likely, the result of decomposing bird guano (Site 6) Mangrove with mixed hardwoods (Site 3) The pond water was clear but with discolored in reddish mounds of sediment about .4 m in diameter. These discolored mounds formed a patchwork across the pond in semi regular intervals. The coloration, presumably leached from the leaves and bark of the red mangrove, is similar in color to the terra-rosa formation. (Site 11)

Slide58: 

The red mangrove (Rhizophera mangle) is easily recognized by its distinctive arching roots. It is the most salt tolerant.

Slide59: 

Rhizophora mangle Multi trunk shrub or tree to 75’, gray bark, red inside, more rounded 2-6” rhododendron-like leaf, aerial prop roots; most salt water tolerant.

Slide60: 

Avicennia sp. Grows more inland, root projections called pneumatophores, which help to supply the plant with air in submerged soils.

Slide61: 

Avicennia germinas 2-4” dark green magnolia-like leaf with point,, Dark trunk to 60’; pencil-like aerial roots, Elongate, pointed fruits; Saline habitat.

Slide63: 

Laguncularia racemosa Grow farther inland No outstanding root structures. Least salt tolerant of the three species. Jackson Pond (MA 2002)

Slide64: 

Laguncularia racemosa 5-8’ tall; Large white mangroves; Pebbly bark on mature trees; Laurel-like leaf; Green buttons; clusters of flowers.

Beach Cotton : 

Beach Cotton Gossypium hirsutum Short staple cotton A course herb/shrub to 4m tall clothed with simple hairs. Leaves 5-15 cm long, blades 3-lobes, cordate Flower petals 4cm long, pale lemon-yellow turning pink

Verbina: 

Verbina Verbina caymanensis Shrub to 1m tall. Leaves 3 – 12cm long, 4 cm wide, alternate, narrowly ovate, serrate and very textured. Orange flowers in corymbose panicles.

Buttonwood: 

Buttonwood Conocarpus erectus Slender, acutely pointed leaf, Yellow flowers, Dark gray, rough bark sheds in thin strips on older trees. rounded, ½”button-like fruits; Found associated with inland mangroves Often colonized by bromeliads and orchards.

Jasmine: 

Jasmine Very sappy; mottled white bark with orange and light gray blotches; rhododendron-like form leaf with alternate veins; white flower; Very fragrant; multi-trunk; 12’ tall Plumeria obtusa

Plop nut: 

Plop nut Heart-shaped leaf, 7-20cm long; Rose-of-Sharon –like flower Pale yellow in morning to red by evening; multi-trunk tree to 10m tall; Can form thickets; brown, shriveled apple-like fruit; containing angular, hairy seeds typically boarders mangrove swamp Thespesia populnea

Duppy Basil: 

Duppy Basil Phyllanthus angustifolia Shrub; 2’tall; succulent-like foliage; tiny white or red flower; woody stem; alternate leaves; smells like basil. Tufts in leaf notches

Amaryllis: 

Amaryllis Hymenocallus caymanensis Wild white lily, leaves 20 –80 cm long, starburst or fire-works-like flower

Wild strawberry: 

Wild strawberry Rubus rosifolius Compound leaf, serrate, thorns everywhere.

Coastal Mangrove: 

Coastal Mangrove Site 22: Beach Near Tarpon Lake Site 41: Walter’s Dock Site42: Owen Island Date: July 29 – Aug 1, 2002 Site #22: The coral rubble from the fringing reef formed a nearly exposed shallow ridge at @ 100m offshore. Water depth on ridge: 1 - 6”. Upon swimming out to it revealed that mangroves were attempting to colonize the ridge, forming an island/ atoll.

Coastal Mangrove: 

Coastal Mangrove Site #41: Red and black mangrove colonizing the shore near Walter’s Dock.

Coastal Mangrove: 

Coastal Mangrove Site #42: Coastal mangrove, red and black, colonizing the east and western edges of Owen Island.

Slide76: 

Rhizophora mangle Multi trunk shrub or tree to 75’, Gray bark, red inside, Leaf rounded 2-6”, rhododendron-like aerial prop roots; most salt water tolerant.

Slide77: 

Avicennia germinas 2-4” magnolia-like leaf with point, dark green, dark trunk to 60’; pencil-like aerial roots, elongate, pointed fruits; saline habitat.

Coastal Communities: 

Coastal Communities Sandy substrates and sand flats Cobble Beach Rocky substrates and steep rocky coasts Owen Island beach community. Most of the beaches of Little Cayman are protected by offshore fringing reefs, and are low and long.

Beach Hedge Community: 

Beach Hedge Community The beach hedge consisted of dense Coccoloba, often with Cordia, Cocos or Terminalia. There is commonly a very sparse herb or shrub zone seaward consisting of Suriana, Sesuvium, Caesalpina or scattered Mallotonia. Beachfront colonizers are Ipomea, Euphorbia and Cenchrus.

Cobble Beach Communities: 

Cobble Beach Communities Cobble beach communities are sometimes hard to distinguish from sandy beach, if the sand and rubble are mixed. On rubble ridges, however, the communities are distinct, with Cocoloba the dominant species. Other species associated with the ridges are: Ambrosia, Suriana, Ipomea and Sesuvium found on the sandy strips, with Hymenocallis, Borrichia, Thespia and Morinda on the rubble.

Rocky Pavement Communities: 

Rocky Pavement Communities Rocky pavement on Little Cayman consists of the Ironshore outcrop, which is located mainly on the western 1/5 of the island . From Salt Rock, site 40, to Splash House, site 37, Light House Point, site 38, to Pirates Point, site 25, and a small portion of Mary’s Bay. Shoreward from 15 – 20m there are scattered mats of Sesuvium. Inland, in sand filled patches Conocarpus, Borrichia, Rhachicallis, Suriana and Strumpfia are found. Finally a dense hedge of Coccoloba forms the linear edge of the pavement and often covers a rubble ridge.

Beach, Berms; Coastal Communities: 

Beach, Berms; Coastal Communities Site 5: Blossom Road Shoreline Site 10: Northern Shoreline of Olivine Kirk Road Site 13: Future CCMI Location Site 17: Calabash Ridge Site 25: Pirates Point Beach Site 28: West of Splash House Site 40 Salt Rock Flora Site42: Owen Island Date: July 29 – Aug 1, 2002 Geology: Elevated coral rubble berm above shore. 1 - 5 meter mounds of coral debris were present in back of the sand/rubble supra tidal shoreline.

Beach Berms; Inner Shore: 

Beach Berms; Inner Shore Shore line and beach berms on the bay side of Owen Island.

Sea grape: 

Sea grape Coccoloba uvifera Large, round leaves, stems run through centers, red central vein Pale yellow flower spikes followed by edible green grapes in panicles, Pale gray bark exfoliates to reveal rich, orange brown patches beneath. Forms dense thickets.

Plop nut: 

Plop nut Heart-shaped leaf, 7-20cm long; Rose-of-Sharon –like flower Pale yellow in morning to red by evening; multi-trunk tree to 10m tall; Can form thickets; brown, shriveled apple-like fruit; containing angular, hairy seeds typically boarders mangrove swamp Thespesia populnea

Broadleaf: 

Broadleaf Cordia sebestena var. caymanensis Tall, thin tree with narrow, sparse crown. Bark on mature trees becomes corky with deep vertical furrows & horizontal cracks. Huge, sandpaper leaf, to 30cm long, opposite veins, serrate; White Italian-pepper-like 1.5” fruit; clusters of trumpet-like orange flowers

Casuarina: 

Casuarina Casuarina equisetifolia Australian/ Weeping willow Long needled pine; single needles; needles segmented; larch-like cone Buttressed trunk, fluted at the base. Bark deeply and irregularly cracked along length.

Coconut palm: 

Coconut palm Cocos nucifera Large leaf scars on trunk, typical palm leaf, coconuts

Bayvine: 

Bayvine Ipomoea pes-caprae Ground cover; morning glory-like flower; Rounded, notched leaf; vine; creeper

Amaryllis / Spider lily: 

Amaryllis / Spider lily Hymenocallus caymanensis Wild white lily, leaves 20 –80 cm long, starburst or fire-works-like flower

Ambrosia / Wormwood: 

Ambrosia / Wormwood Ambrosia hispida Ambrosia-like rag weed

Bay Candleweed: 

Bay Candleweed Borrichia arborescens Black candlewood Erect shrub, silvery, fleshy texture; opposite leaves, tufted w/ 1-3 nerves; leaves thick and leathery, simple, entire or toothed.

Duppy Basil: 

Duppy Basil Phyllanthus angustifolia Shrub; 2’tall; succulent-like foliage; tiny white or red flower; Tufts in leaf notches woody stem; alternate leaves; smells like basil. Phyllanthus nutans Leaves ovate, flat, obtuse, rounded at base.

Batis / Pickelweed: 

Batis / Pickelweed Batis maritima Juniper-like, very tiny, scale-like leaves glabrous shrub w/ sweet odor; 1-2’ shrub; bamboo stems

Euphorbia: 

Euphorbia Euphorbia trichotoma Herb-like shrub, succulent with woody tap root. Branches not more than 20cm long; Numerous crowded; 2-8mm leaves, margins entire, oblanceolate, alternate. Leaves crowded into rosettes. Sandy beaches.

Sea Lavender: 

Sea Lavender Mallotonia gnaphalodes Argusia gnaphalodes Silver and tomentose, hairy like lambs ear; oblancelot leaf 3-6cm long; dense, mound-like shrub to 2m tall; stalked flowers in dense cymes; ‘v’ leaf scars

Strumpfia: 

Strumpfia Strumpfia maritima 4-5’ Flat topped or mounded low shrub; leaves glossy upper and yellow undersides sandpaper (tomentose); pine scent, coarse branching leaves 1-2.5 cm long, 1-3mm wide.

Soft bur: 

Soft bur Cenchrus triloboides Spreading, erect grass; flat leaves, 10 –30cm long; radiating clumps, like crabgrass. Burs pointy.

Wild sage: 

Wild sage Lantana camara Spiraea-like shrub; russet color leaves; magenta to purple colored berries at apex; orange flowers in clusters; leaves textured, opposite or whorled, rough and serrate

Sea pusley/Donkey tails: 

Sea pusley/Donkey tails Sesuvivum sp. * 3 different species. Succulent, creeping herb branched, fleshy stems. Leaves 2 – 6 cm long, opposite; tiny pink flower; stems like bamboo; sandy beaches

Sea pusley/Donkey tails: 

Sea pusley/Donkey tails Sesuvium microphyllum Creeping succulent forming mats in sandy hollows among sea rocks. Leaves 1 – 2 cm, capsules 4 – 5 mm long.

Suriana: 

Suriana

Fauna of Little Cayman: 

Fauna of Little Cayman Caterpillar on jasmine. (Photos: MA 2002) Termites on Ironwood tree

Fauna of Little Cayman: 

Fauna of Little Cayman Iguana

Fauna of Little Cayman: 

Fauna of Little Cayman Butterflies.

Fauna of Little Cayman: 

Fauna of Little Cayman Sea Turtles of Little Cayman.

Fauna of Little Cayman: 

Fauna of Little Cayman A reminder of the close relationship between mangrove swamps and the mosquito.

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