Ten Things You Might Like to Know About

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Ten Things You Might Like to Know About the Earth’s Moon: 

Ten Things You Might Like to Know About the Earth’s Moon A short presentation by the Howard Astronomical League

In 1609 and 1610, the first years that the newly invented telescope was turned towards the Moon, Thomas Harriot made a number of drawings of his telescopic observations of the Moon. : 

In 1609 and 1610, the first years that the newly invented telescope was turned towards the Moon, Thomas Harriot made a number of drawings of his telescopic observations of the Moon.

Slide4: 

The Unlabeled Moon

The Labeled Moon: 

The Labeled Moon

1. Theories of Moon Formation: 

1. Theories of Moon Formation Even now we do not know with absolute certainty…

Accretion: 

Accretion …the Moon and the Earth formed at about the same time, 4.6 billion years ago, when the solar system emerged from the Solar Nebulae

Capture: 

Capture …the Moon formed elsewhere in the solar system and was subsequently captured by the Earth

Fission: 

Fission …the Moon split off from the Earth

Collision Ejecta: 

Collision Ejecta …the Earth collided with a very large object (as big as Mars or more) very early during the formation of the solar system and the Moon formed from the ejected material

2. The Moveable Moon: 

2. The Moveable Moon It used to be a lot closer…

Slide15: 

The Moon used to occupy a sizeable amount of the sky. No one is exactly sure how large it appeared from the Earth or how close the fully formed Moon actually was to the Earth. Calculations predict around 13, 500 miles. There were no human eyes to see it. Back then, like a tether ball on a rope wrapped around the pole or keys on the end of a chain swinging around your finger, it "swung" a lot faster because it was "wound up" closer to the pivot. The Earth revolved once every 5 hours or so.

Slide16: 

Nowadays the moon constantly moves further away from the Earth – at a rate of about 1-1/2 inches per year. Every century the moon moves just over 12 feet further away. In the next one million years the moon will be about 24 miles further away from the earth.

3. The Moon’s Ultimate Fate: 

3. The Moon’s Ultimate Fate The Moon will continue to drift outward until, in the remote future, the Earth and the Moon will be locked in a frozen embrace like Pluto and its satellite Charon. Then the Earth will turn on its axis once in the same period the Moon revolves around it, about once every 50 days.

4. A Dead Moon: 

4. A Dead Moon Dead, essentially, for 3.8 billion years or more…

For hundreds of years it was thought desperately that the Moon had a volcanic history like the Earth’s. The Moon HAS had a limited volcanic history, in fact. A Picture taken in 1994 by the Clementine mission shows a volcano on the Moon’s South Pole from millions of years ago. This is fairly recent in the Moon’s history, which explains why there are few impact craters nearby. But vulcanism is the minor player in the Moon’s history.: 

For hundreds of years it was thought desperately that the Moon had a volcanic history like the Earth’s. The Moon HAS had a limited volcanic history, in fact. A Picture taken in 1994 by the Clementine mission shows a volcano on the Moon’s South Pole from millions of years ago. This is fairly recent in the Moon’s history, which explains why there are few impact craters nearby. But vulcanism is the minor player in the Moon’s history.

The Far Side of the Moon: 

The Far Side of the Moon The major player is meteorite impact, mostly occurring during the Moon’s early history – the so-called periods of heavy and light bombardment. And incidentally there is no permanent dark side of the Moon except on Pink Floyd albums.

5. A Brief Series of Visits: 

5. A Brief Series of Visits Just 30 years ago…

The Lunar Landscape from Apollo 17: 

The Lunar Landscape from Apollo 17

Apollo 11 Landing Site: 

Apollo 11 Landing Site

Slide27: 

Apollo 11 - Jul. 16th - Jul. 24th (1969) Crew: Neil A. Armstrong, Commander Edwin E. Aldrin, Lunar Module Pilot Michael Collins, Command Module Pilot Apollo 16 - Jul. 26th - Aug. 7th (1971) Crew: John W. Young, Commander Thomas K. Mattingly II, Cmd. Module Pilot Charles M. Duke, Jr., Lunar Module Pilot Apollo 17 - Dec. 7th - Dec. 19th (1972) Crew: Eugene A. Cernan, Commander Ronald B. Evans, Command Module Pilot Harrison H. Schmitt, Lunar Module Pilot

Slide28: 

Apollo 12 - Nov. 14th - Nov. 24th (1969) Crew: Charles Conrad, Jr., Commander Richard F. Gordon, Jr., Command Module Pilot Alan L. Bean, Lunar Module Pilot Apollo 14 - Jan. 31th - Feb. 9th (1971) Crew: Alan B. Shepard, Jr., Commander Stuart A. Roosa , Command Module Pilot Edgar D. Mitchell, Lunar Module Pilot Apollo 15 - Jul. 26th - Aug. 7th (1971) Crew: David R. Scott, Commander Alfred M. Worden, Command Module Pilot James B. Irwin, Lunar Module Pilot

6. Light and Dark Areas: 

6. Light and Dark Areas A cursory view of the moon…

Slide30: 

The light areas are heavily cratered, rocky, high land on the moon, known as the Uplands. They cover 85% of the moon’s near side and almost all of the moon’s far side. The dark areas are called 'maria'. 'Maria' is a Latin word for 'seas', because it was believed that these dark areas were actually seas. They are, instead, smoother, lower areas of land, with fewer impact craters. The cover 15% of the moon’s near side and almost none of the moon’s far side.

Slide31: 

The key to all of this is: The Moon's surface was first shaped by heavy meteorite bombardment, followed by lava floods. All of the Moon used to look like the light areas, heavily cratered. The lava flows later filled in many of the cratered areas.

7. As Bright as Asphalt: 

7. As Bright as Asphalt The moon shines by reflected sunlight…

The Moon’s Albedo: 

The Moon’s Albedo Brightness Next to the sun, the full moon is the brightest object in the heavens. However, its surface is rough and brownish and reflects light very poorly. In fact, the moon is about the poorest reflector in the solar system. The amount of light reflected by a celestial object is called the albedo (Latin: albus, white). The moon reflects only 7% of the sunlight that falls upon it, so the albedo is 0.07.

8. Phases of the Moon: 

8. Phases of the Moon It all adds up to 29.53 days…

Phases of the Moon: 

Phases of the Moon

9. Eclipses: 

9. Eclipses Enjoy them while they last…

Solar Eclipse: 

Solar Eclipse

Solar Eclipse: 

Solar Eclipse

Solar Eclipse Collage 2002: 

Solar Eclipse Collage 2002

Lunar Eclipse: 

Lunar Eclipse

Lunar Eclipse: 

Lunar Eclipse

Slide46: 

It is quite remarkable that total solar eclipses even occur at all. They are possible because the Sun and the Moon appear from Earth to be about the same size in the sky. The Sun, whose diameter is 400 times that of the Moon, happens to be about 400 times as far away from the Earth. This condition permits the Moon to just barely cover up the Sun. In fact, if the Moon's diameter (2,160 miles) were just 140 miles less, it would not be large enough to ever completely cover the Sun -- a total solar eclipse could never happen anywhere on Earth!

10. Moonstruck!: Luna, Lunacy, Looney – The Lunar Effect?: 

10. Moonstruck!: Luna, Lunacy, Looney – The Lunar Effect? Correlation does not mean causation…

Do things get crazy when the moon is full?: 

Do things get crazy when the moon is full? -the homicide rate -traffic accidents -crisis calls to police or fire stations -domestic violence -births of babies -suicide -major disasters -casino payout rates -assassinations -kidnappings -aggression by professional hockey players -violence in prisons -psychiatric admissions -agitated behavior by nursing home residents -assaults -gunshot wounds -stabbings -emergency room admissions -behavioral outbursts of psychologically challenged rural adults -lycanthropy -vampirism -alcoholism -sleep walking -epilepsy

Moonstruck! Does the full moon influence behavior?: 

Moonstruck! Does the full moon influence behavior? No. Correlation does not necessarily mean causation…

Bonus! 11. Faces in the Moon: 

Bonus! 11. Faces in the Moon This is the moon before any outline is drawn. Use this as a reference to visualize upcoming shapes.

Woman in the Moon: 

Woman in the Moon Every person may see the image a little differently. Length of hair and the shape of her face may vary.

Man Reading a Book: 

Man Reading a Book This view may vary depending on your earthly location.

The Bogeyman Moon: 

The Bogeyman Moon

Rabbit in the Moon: 

Rabbit in the Moon

Man in the Moon: 

Man in the Moon

Slide56: 

Thanks for coming out to view the Moon!!

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