Introduction to Graphs

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This is a ppt on INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHS. This ppt contains details with some examples of different types of graphs...

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WELCOME To My slide show

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INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHS

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Do you know What is GRAPHS

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The purpose of the graph is to show numerical facts in visual form so that they can be understood quickly, easily and clearly. Thus graphs are visual representations of data collected . Data can also be presented in the form of a table; however a graphical presentation is easier to understand .

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How many types of graphs are there ? Bar Graphs Pie Graphs Line Graphs Linear Graphs A Histogram

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1. A Bar Graph --------------- --- A Bar graph is used to show comparison among categories . It may consist of two or more parallel vertical ( or horizontal ) bars . A Bar graph can also have double bars .

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For Example :- Fruits Sale (in KG) This graph gives a comparative account of sales of various fruits over a two-day period .

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2. A Pie Graph -------------- --- A pie-graph is used to compare parts of a whole . There is an example

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For Example :- 15 % 25 % 45 %

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3. Line Graph A line graph display data that changes continuously over periods of time . There is an example

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For Example :- The line shows the sale of fruits on the different days .

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4. Linear Graphs A linear graph consists of bits of line segment joined consecutively . Sometimes the graph may be a whole unbroken line . Such a graph is called a linear graph . To draw such a line we need to now learn how to locate points conveniently on a graph sheet .

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5. A Histogram A histogram is a bar graph that shows data in intervals . It has adjacent bars over the intervals .

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Other basic concepts If a , b & c are any three whole numbers , then # a + b is a whole number # a – b is a whole number only when a > b # a × b is a whole number

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# a / b is not necessarily a whole number # a + b = b + a # a × b = b × a # a + 0 = a = 0 + a # a × ( b – c ) = a × b – a × c

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# a – b ≠ b – a # a + ( b + c ) = ( a + b ) + c # a × ( b + c ) = a × b + a × c # a × 0 = 0 = 0 × a # a / a = 1 # a / 1 = a # a / 0 is not defined but 0 / a = 0 # a × 1 = 1 × a = a

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THE END BY :- ABHISHEK GUPTA

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