Talent Management 2

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Driving Business through Integrated Talent Management Part-2:

An Initiative of Shivnandani Industries Pvt Ltd & Jagdamb Janaki Nawal Janaki Society By Col Mukteshwar Prasad( Retd ), MTech,CE (I),FIE(I), FIETE,FISLE,FInstOD,AMCSI Driving Business through Integrated Talent Management Part-2

Mapping Business Execution Drivers to Talent Management Processes…. :

Mapping Business Execution Drivers to Talent Management Processes….

The Problem with Traditional Talent Management Processes :

The Problem with Traditional Talent Management Processes The fundamental problem with performance management and other traditional talent management processes such as succession, development, compensation and staffing, is they are extremely ill defined. Companies designing these processes often start creating forms, tools and process maps without clearly articulating what the processes are intended to do. It is common for companies to try to accomplish multiple, conflicting objectives with a single process. The result is a process that doesn’t do anything very well, except give employees and managers something they can all complain about.

The Problem with Traditional Talent Management Processes :

The Problem with Traditional Talent Management Processes All talent management processes increase workforce productivity by doing three basic things: Forecasting the kinds of employees the company needs to execute its business strategies. Predicting employee behavior to guide staffing and job assignment decisions, and/or Changing employee behavior to increase productivity and manage turnover. Talent processes achieve these things by creating methods that collect data to guide workforce decisions, evaluate employee performance, potential, and capabilities, encourage conversations between employees and managers to increase performance and retention, and/or d. support decisions related to staffing, promotion, development, and pay. The major problem with many talent management processes is they try to accomplish too many of these different functions at once, or they over-emphasize one function to the detriment of others.

The Problem with Traditional Talent Management Processes :

The Problem with Traditional Talent Management Processes For example, succession management involves a mix of forecasting workforce needs, evaluating employee potential, developing and retaining high potential candidates, and making staffing and promotion decisions. Process steps that support one of these activities (e.g. staffing) may have little relevance to other activities (e.g. development). performance management against talent management process suffers from the problem of “confused and convoluted objectives” and people expect performance management processes to support multiple activities that do not align well with each other. These activities include, but are not limited to:

multiple activities support for performance management:

multiple activities support for performance management Coaching: Creating conversations that drive clarity around performance expectations and development opportunities. The primary goal is to increase workforce alignment and productivity. This is best done in a more informal, ongoing basis and usually does not include any normative performance evaluation or numerical rating. Performance Evaluation: Accurately assessing and rating employees based on the contributions they are making to the organization relative to their peers. The primary goal is to take accurate stock of the talent levels in the company to guide staffing and compensation decisions. This usually includes making direct comparisons between the performance levels of different employees.

multiple activities support for performance management..:

multiple activities support for performance management.. Performance Feedback: Letting employees know where they stand in terms of their performance and how they can increase their performance levels. The primary goal is to ensure employees feel they are being treated fairly and consistently and understand what is required to be successful in the company. It is worth noting that the process required to accurately evaluate performance are quite different from the processes required to effectively share the evaluations with employees. In fact, the accuracy of manager ratings often improves if the ratings are not going to be shared with employees. Pay and Staffing Decisions: Ensuring that personnel decisions about staffing, promotions, and pay are influenced by employees’ performance levels. The primary goal is to ensure personnel decisions are done in a way that strengthens the company’s overall workforce capabilities. Employee performance is not the only factor that drives pay and promotion decisions, but it should be an important factor. But there are times when other factors may significantly reduce relationships between employee performance and pay or promotion decisions (e.g., when there is a salary freeze).

summary:

summary Efforts to design performance management processes benefit when companies approach these four activities as things that are inter-related but far from identical. What does not work is trying to combine all four activities into one annual performance management event. The main problem with traditional talent management process is the objectives of these processes are not well defined. What “performance management” means to a person in one company may be much different from what it means to a person in another company. If the primary purpose of your performance management process is to evaluate employees, then call it a performance evaluation process. If it is to develop employees, then call it an employee development process. But don’t try to create one process that attempts to do both of these things, and ends up doing neither well. In fact, it may be better to avoid using traditional labels when talking about talent management processes. Instead describe them using language that clearly defines what they are intended to : get the right people doing the right things in the right way while driving the right development .

Assessing Talent Management Process Maturity :

Assessing Talent Management Process Maturity

Five levels of process maturity associated with the four core talent management processes:

Five levels of process maturity associated with the four core talent management processes Maintaining talent pipelines Influential Operational Maintaining Talent Pipelines Forecasting Future Talent Needs Calibrated Coordinated Effort Career Growth Building talent pools Impactful Meaningful Goals Business Driven Development Selecting high performers Well Defined Aligned Goals Targeted Development Filling Open Positions Consistent Tangible Goals Individual development planning Right People Right Way Right Things Right Development

Talent management maturity level:

Talent management maturity level Right People Maturity levels. Ensuring you have the “right people” begins with creating processes to efficiently fill open positions. The next level focuses on building assessments to ensure you are hiring high performers. Level 3 shifts the emphasis from screening candidates to building internal and external talent pools of qualified applicants. Level 4 moves from building general talent pools to making specific forecasts around the number of hires you will need to fill different positions and when you will need them. This sets the stage for level 5, actively maintaining talent pipelines to efficiently and effectively put the right people in the right jobs at the right time. Right Things Maturity levels. Begins with ensuring employees have well defined goals. Simply mapping out a clear set of goals and expectations is a major leap forward for many organizations. The next level focuses on ensuring employees’ goals are aligned with the company’s overall strategy. Level 3 shifts the focus to setting goals that are meaningful to employees. This involves using methods to ensure employees’ goals are relevant to their personal career aspirations. Level 4 focuses on building collaboration within the company around common types of goals. Level 5 emphasizes getting business leaders to use goal processes as tools for running and managing the business. As one COO put it

Talent management maturity level..:

Talent management maturity level.. Right Way Maturity levels. Ensuring employees are doing things the right way requires defining and measuring employee performance and using performance evaluations to inform development discussions and staffing and pay decisions. The basis of accurate measurement is consistency, which is the lowest level of maturity. This requires making sure employee performance is evaluated using consistent, standardized methods. The next level emphasizes creating clear performance definitions, competency models and goal criteria to guide performance evaluations. Level 3 focuses on using performance data so it impacts decisions related to employee pay, development, and staffing. Level 4 emphasizes the use of calibration processes that get managers across the organization to agree on common levels of performance expectations and employee evaluations. At level 5, business leaders leverage performance management data to gain insight into the workforce itself. For example, determining what competencies are most relevant to success in different roles, assessing the overall strengths and weaknesses of the workforce, and identifying actions that can be used to increase overall workforce productivity.

Talent management maturity level…:

Talent management maturity level… Right Development. Right development emphasizes the use of career and succession management to build the overall capabilities of the workforce. The lowest level is simply making sure employees have discussed development needs with their managers and have some form of development plan. The next level focuses on guiding employee development to build specific organizational capabilities or prepare employees for certain job roles. This requires guiding employee development based on future business needs. Level 3 emphasizes having managers staff jobs and assign goals in a way that stretches employees to develop new skills and capabilities. Level 4 shifts the time horizon by providing employees with guidance on identifying and achieving long term career objectives within the organization. Level 5 is about actively integrating employee development with workforce planning and staffing to maintain a steady supply of high performing talent in key jobs across the company.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Organizations do not necessarily need to master lower levels of maturity to achieve higher levels. But maturity levels do tend to build on one another somewhat like the stories of a building. The stronger the foundation of the lower stories, the more stable the higher levels will be. For example, it is difficult to make impactful decisions using performance management data if your company does not have well defined performance definitions and consistent processes for evaluating employee performance. Developing a general sense of where your company currently is and where it could go with regard to each of the 4 processes will help you to build out a general talent management roadmap. This will provide a sense of where to focus talent management efforts to drive the greatest business value, both in the near term and over several years.

Integrating Talent Processes to Create a Seamless Business Execution Machine. :

Integrating Talent Processes to Create a Seamless Business Execution Machine.

Integrating Talent Processes:

Integrating Talent Processes We have discussed the relationship between business execution and talent management. outlined different levels of talent management maturity that companies may strive for based on their business execution needs. The issues of talent management integration needs to be addressed The phrase “integrated talent management” is often bandied about as something every company should aspire for. But what is integrated talent management? What is required to truly integrate talent management processes? Integration across talent management processes occurs when companies coordinate the four core processes of right people, right things, right way, and right development. For example, blending “right things” and “right development” by assigning employees business goals that enable or even force them to develop new capabilities. Or blending “right people” and “right way” by using performance management evaluations to guide internal staffing decisions.

Integrating talent management processes is critical for at least 3 reasons. :

Integrating talent management processes is critical for at least 3 reasons. Optimization. Increasing the maturity level of one talent management process often requires leveraging techniques or data from other talent management processes. cannot fully optimize any one talent management process without incorporating elements from other processes. For example, level 3 of “right development” is called business driven development. Achieving this level involves using business goals (right things) and job assignments (right people) to support employee development.

Integrating talent management processes is critical for at least 3 reasons. :

Integrating talent management processes is critical for at least 3 reasons. Coordination. Employees become frustrated when they experience uncoordinated talent processes that are all supported by a single HR organization. As one VP of Operations memorably told, “the only thing that integrates our HR processes is the poor victim, I mean employee, subjected to them.” Different talent management processes should use common tools, models, and terminology so employees can transfer knowledge learned from one process to other processes used by the same organization. For example, using the same competency model to support staffing, performance management, and succession management.

Integrating talent management processes is critical for at least 3 reasons.:

Integrating talent management processes is critical for at least 3 reasons. Efficiency. Integrating processes enables companies to be more efficient collecting talent management data, developing process technology, and training employees. It allows companies to re-use elements of one process to support other processes. For example, having goal management data (right things) feed into the processes used for performance management (right way) and succession management (right people and right development). Or using the same technology platform to support setting goals, evaluating performance, and creating development plans.

Integrated talent management:

Integrated talent management

Integrated Talent Managemement example: Right Development & Right People:

Integrated Talent Managemement example: Right Development & Right People

Integrating Talent Processes to Create a Seamless Business Execution Machine.:

Integrating Talent Processes to Create a Seamless Business Execution Machine . Above Figures illustrate how the four core talent management processes integrate with one another. Figure 1 uses a pyramid to illustrate that as talent management processes become more mature they also become more integrated. Figure 2 illustrates this in more detail by comparing the maturity levels associated with “right people” and “right development”. At the lowest level of maturity these two processes are independent. Methods used to ensure employees have individual development plans may have little to do with the methods used to efficiently fill open positions. This changes as process maturity increases. At level 2 both processes focus on hiring or developing people based on well defined job performance requirements. Level 3 emphasizes building talent pools within the organization to support future business needs. Level 4 requires development of long-term models that forecast future workforce needs and career opportunities. And at level 5 the two processes blend into a single process that orchestrates staffing and development activities to maintain a steady supply of high performing talent in critical job roles. Talent management processes become more integrated as their maturity levels increase

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap.:

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap. When building a talent strategy, it is important to think about long-term structural integration points between different processes. Otherwise you can inadvertently create incompatible platforms that prevent the achievement of higher levels of talent management maturity. The following are five critical integration points to consider when developing a talent roadmap. These are certainly not the only points of structural integration, but they are major ones to keep in mind. Single system for employee record keeping. Most human resource information systems (HRIS) focus on tracking relatively uninteresting data from a talent management standpoint. For example, tracking employees’ job titles and salary levels without including any information about how effective employees are in their jobs, the relationship between their salary and performance, or their future career aspirations and potential. As you build out talent management system, focus on creating a single employee point of record that incorporates data from each of the four core talent processes. This will make it much easier to collect data in one process and then utilize it to support other processes.

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap.:

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap. Common definitions of job performance. Build job descriptions, competency models, and goal plans that can effectively support multiple talent management functions. Think how job performance data will be used to provide employees with developmental feedback, determine pay increases, and guide staffing and promotion decisions. Emphasize the use of standard competency frameworks and skill taxonomies that can be used for staffing, performance evaluation, and development.

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap:

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap Integrated personnel decision making processes. Review information collected across all four talent management processes and think about the role it should play in pay, staffing, or development decisions. For example, you may want to consider an employee’s track record of personal development when evaluating their potential for future job roles. Similarly, there is value in examining the kinds of goals employees have achieved when deciding their pay level. Always strive to collect information once and use it multiple ways.

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap:

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap Shared talent databases. Develop databases that can be accessed by multiple people to answer a variety of different talent management questions. For example, providing recruiters with access to succession data so they can search the internal workforce for employees who may be able to fill open positions. Or combining performance management data, staffing data, and career development data to identify what competencies and development interventions are associated with promotions. When building this database, it is important to also develop guidelines around data access and security.

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap:

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap Single operational dashboards. Determine what sort of talent management data will provide the most value to business leaders and present it on a single dashboard. Talent data is usually more interesting when presented in combination with financial or operational data. For example, rather than showing overall turnover rate or the percentage of employees rated as high performers, it may be more interesting to show the turnover rate of employees rated as high performers. Rather than showing performance evaluation levels in different divisions, present a comparison of financial performance with average leadership ratings in each division. Thinking through what data is going to be most interesting to business leaders and how to display it so it creates meaningful insights. This is critical to achieving the highest levels of talent management maturity. Having this “end in mind” is also important for ensuring that you collect the necessary data in the right format.

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap:

Five critical integration points to be considered when developing a talent roadmap Paying attention to these five integration points will reduce the chances of creating talent processes that are overly silo’d and potentially incompatible with one another. Always ask yourself, “how could the process I’m currently designing influence or benefit from integrating with other processes”. Creating an integrated talent management “steering committee” or establishing a single talent management coordinator can also help to create processes that employees and operations leaders will see as seamless, well-coordinated, and coherent.

Conclusion :

Conclusion HR is poised to play a major and critical leadership role in driving the execution of business strategies. This shift from administrative support to business execution represents a massive and exciting transformation for the field of HR. But it will not happen by itself. HR leaders must make a concerted effort to make it happen. HR leaders can begin by using the following three steps to start increasing business execution capability in their companies. Step 1. Prioritize your company’s business execution drivers. Meet with business leaders in your organization and ask them to rank order the 6 business execution drivers in terms of importance. Which drivers are the most critical for executing your company’s strategies over the next one to three years?

Conclusion:

Conclusion Step 2. Evaluate your talent management process maturity. Determine which of the four core talent management processes most impact the business execution drivers that are critical to your company. Assess the current maturity level of these talent processes and determine what improvements will have the greatest influence on your company’s ability to execute its strategies. Step 3. Take action to increase business execution capability. Design and implement targeted talent management processes to increase your company’s business execution capability. Emphasize the use of integrated, efficient processes and technology to ensure you achieve the maximum value with the least disruption to ongoing business operations. Do not be afraid to drive change when necessary, but limit change to things that will make a significant difference to the company’s strategic success. Communicate the business reasons for adopting more effective talent management processes. Make sure these processes are viewed as tools to drive business execution, and are not merely seen as additional administrative HR tasks.

Conclusion:

Conclusion These actions will help re-define HR from a function that emphasizes process completion to a function focused on driving business execution. This paper has shared a variety of models and concepts that can help to make this shift. We have the knowledge, tools, and a blueprint for getting there. Now it is up to us to make it happen.

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