Inference

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Making Inferences:

Making Inferences Mr. Whitehead July 11, 2011 English II Click the button to begin

Instructions:

Instructions This button will take you to the previous slide. Exit This button will take you to the next slide. This button will take you to the table of contents. This button will end the slideshow. This button will take you to the last slide viewed. *You will sometimes be asked to download a file by clicking the button, play a video by clicking the button, and listen to an audio clip by clicking the button.*

Table of Contents:

Table of Contents 2 ─ Instructions 3 ─ Table of Contents 4 ─ Introduction 6 ─ Objectives 8 ─ Rubric 9 ─ Quiz Checklist 10 ─ Meet Gromit 11 ─ Big Question 12 ─ What is Inference? 13 ─ Drawing Conclusions 16 ─ Making an Inference 17 ─ Inferences Need Support 18 ─ Movie Time! 19 ─ Details. Details. Details. 20 ─ Further Practice 21 ─ Assignment 1 22 ─ Assignment 2 23 ─ Practice Quiz 24 ─ Feedback 25 ─ Summary

Introduction:

Introduction Much like good detectives who look for clues to solve cases, good readers utilize inferences to unlock the deeper meaning of an author’s work. In this lesson, you will: Read selected story from their text books and recall various facts from the text through short answer questions. Summarize and paraphrase the selected story by locating the main idea and giving supporting examples from the text in their written reflection.

Introduction (cont.):

Introduction (cont.) Utilize evidence from the text to draw a conclusion about one of the characters in the selected reading. You will discuss your conclusion in a small group discussion . Utilize evidence from the text to infer information about the characters or story that is not directly stated by the author. You will discuss this in a written reflection and will utilize inferences in a paper-based quiz.

Objectives:

Objectives Objective 1 : After completing the computer-based lesson on reading comprehension and after reading the assigned short story in their textbooks , you will be able to identify the main idea of the story and three supporting details from the text with 80% accuracy (rubric to be used) through an in-class written reflection. Objective 2 : After completing the computer-based lesson on reading comprehension and after reading the assigned short story in their textbooks, you will be able to draw conclusions and make inferences about the characters from the text with 80% accuracy (rubric to be used) through an in-class written reflection.

Objectives (cont.):

Objectives (cont.) Objective 3 : After completing the computer-based lesson on reading comprehension and after reading the assigned short story in their textbooks, you will be able to demonstrate knowledge by answering questions based on inferences from the text with 80% accuracy through an in-class paper-based quiz. Name of Assignment Slide where rubric is found. Written Reflection 1 – Summarize, Paraphrase 8 - Reflection Rubric Written Reflection 2 –Inferences from text 8 - Reflection Rubric Quiz – Inferences from text 9. Quiz Study Guide

Reflection Rubric:

Reflection Rubric To download r ubric click this icon.

Quiz – Checklist:

Quiz – Checklist To download study guide click this icon.

Meet Gromit – An Example of Inference:

Meet Gromit – An Example of Inference This is Gromit . He has been the lead character in several short films and a full-length film that have won numerous awards including academy awards. He also doesn’t speak.

The Big Question About Gromit:

The Big Question About Gromit Q. How can a character that doesn’t speak communicate with the viewer effectively? A. The viewer uses inferences .

What is Inference?:

What is Inference? To infer means to make an educated guess using incomplete information. Author’s don’t always tell you everything, but to fully understand the text, we have to draw a conclusion or in other words a reasonable judgment . A good inference is much like winning a game of Clue.

Drawing Conclusions:

Drawing Conclusions Inference questions will test your ability to draw conclusions about the information you have read or in the case of Gromit what you have seen. What emotion do you think Gromit is feeling in this picture? How can you tell or in other words what supports your answer?

What about Now?:

What about Now? What emotion do you think Gromit is feeling in this picture? Has the emotion changed? If so, what details are different?

Practice Question 1:

Practice Question 1 Watch the clip about Wallace, who is Gromit’s owner and decide which of the following statements about Wallace’s emotions are true: A. Wallace is relaxed. B . Wallace is happy . C . Wallace is scared. D . Wallace is bored. Click on the answer to see if its correct. Wrong answers will disappear when selected.

Making an Inference:

Making an Inference The answer to an inference question will not be directly stated in the text. You’ll have to piece together the information you have and decide what it really means. Gathering details from a passage to answer an inference questions is much like gathering evidence to solve a mystery. The clues are there, you just have to find them and fit them together.

Inferences Need Support!:

Inferences N eed S upport! Inferences are not stated directly in the passage, but they are supported by the passage. A valid inference must be based on something in the passage such as the details, the author’s tone, or other text clues.

Movie Time!!!:

Movie Time!!! Click the button to view a short clip featuring Gromit . While you watch, ask yourself the following questions: What details explain what important day it is for Gromit ? What details explain how Gromit’s feeling? Can you draw a conclusion about what the rest of the movie is about?

Details. Details. Details.:

Details. Details. Details. What important day is it for Gromit ? A. His birthday! Details: Calendar, Presents, Card What emotions does Gromit feel during the clip? A. Excitement, Fear, Disappointment Details: His facial expressions, body language What can we infer the rest of the movie will be about? A. Problems with poverty and pants. Details: Music, Wallace’s finances, Gromit’s reaction Click on this box to reveal answer! Click on this box to reveal answer! Click on this box to reveal answer!

Further Practice:

Further Practice If you would like further practice with basic inferences, press this button to play an inference riddle game. Riddle Game

Assignment 1:

Assignment 1 Read the story “The Necklace” in your textbook. Summarize and paraphrase the selected story by locating the main idea and giving supporting examples from the text in a written reflection. To begin reflection press this button.

Assignment 2:

Assignment 2 Utilize evidence from the text to draw a conclusion about one of the characters in the selected reading. You will discuss your conclusion in a small group discussion. Then, utilize evidence from the text to infer information about the characters or story that is not directly stated by the author. You will discuss this in a written reflection and will utilize inferences in a paper-based quiz . To begin reflection press this button.

Practice Quiz:

Practice Quiz Press the button and practice what you have learned about inference and drawing conclusions before the in-class quiz. Practice Quiz To begin quiz press this button.

Feedback:

Feedback Press the button and answer the following questions about the lesson. This is the part of the lesson that you can give constructive feedback in order to improve the lesson for future classes. To begin feedback press this button.

Summary:

Summary During the course of this lesson, you learned: What an inference is and how it can be used in literature. Why it is necessary and important to utilize inferences to draw conclusions. What makes an interference valid. How to draw inferences based on clues given by the author.

Conclusion:

Conclusion Congrats!!! You have passed the Inference lesson in English II. To exit press the EXIT button at the bottom of the slide.

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