posner RRL june 2007 slides

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IT’S A 2–DAY TEST!: 

IT’S A 2–DAY TEST! DON’T MISS A SECTION! Session 1 Thursday, June 14, 2007 9:15 AM Session 2 Friday, June 15, 2007 9:15 AM

THE TEST ON THE WEB: 

THE TEST ON THE WEB www.regentsreviewlive.net Links to: NYSED: Recent Tests andamp; Answers Regents study help RRL shows and slides Print PDF Files for Further Study

THE RUBRIC: 

THE RUBRIC Your test is scored on five QUALITIES MEANING DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION LANGUAGE CONVENTIONS Each quality receives a SCORE from 1–6 A FORMULA translates the score (+ score on Multiple Choice) into a GRADE

THE RUBRIC: 

THE RUBRIC MEANING Did you do what they asked? Did you show that you understood the text(s)? Did you discuss the text, not just summarize it?

THE RUBRIC: 

THE RUBRIC DEVELOPMENT Did you use specific details from the text? Did the details support your main idea?

THE RUBRIC: 

THE RUBRIC ORGANIZATION Did you write an introduction that states your point? Did you write a conclusion that restates your point? Did you keep restating your point throughout? Did you use transitional words andamp; phrases?

THE RUBRIC: 

THE RUBRIC LANGUAGE USE Did you write for the intended audience? Did you vary sentences for good rhythm? Did you use appropriate vocabulary?

THE RUBRIC: 

THE RUBRIC CONVENTIONS Did you spell words correctly? Did you use correct punctuation? Did you use correct grammar?

OLYMPIC SCORING: 

OLYMPIC SCORING Each quality is assigned a score from 1 (yucky) to 6 (great). Graders use a chart to figure out your grade. MEANING DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION LANGUAGE USE CONVENTIONS 1–6

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

OVERVIEW (WHAT YOU WILL HEAR andamp; DO) Overview: For this part of the test, you will listen to an account about saving the ocean environment, answer some multiple-choice questions, and write a response based on the situation described below. You will hear the account twice. You may take notes on the next page anytime you wish during the readings. SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

SITUATION ('LET’S PRETEND') The Situation: In order to increase membership in the environmental club at your school, you have decided to give a presentation to students in your school on saving the ocean environment. In preparation for writing your presentation, listen to an account about the ocean environment by Peter Benchley, author of the novel Jaws. Then use relevant information from the account to write your presentation. SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

HERE IS THE SPEECH, SO READ IT CAREFULLY: SORRY, BOYS AND GIRLS! YOU NEVER SEE THE SPEECH! YOU HAVE ONLY YOUR NOTES! SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING What They Don’t Want You To Know Since the speech is ALREADY ORGANIZED WITH SUPPORTING DETAILS, your ESSAY will be ALREADY ORGANIZED WITH SUPPORTING DETAILS! All you have to do is WRITE THEM DOWN!

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

THE QUESTIONS ('SCAFFOLDING') SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING The bodies of sharks whose fins were used for soup were found near (1) Newfoundland (2) Costa Rica (3) Long Island (4) Cape Cod

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

FACT QUESTION: Find the evidence in the text. SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING The bodies of sharks whose fins were used for soup were found near (1) Newfoundland (2) Costa Rica (3) Long Island (4) Cape Cod 'I have seen the sea bottom off Costa Rica littered with the bodies of sharks that were stripped of their fins — to make soup in Asia'.

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING The speaker labels mankind’s pollution of the sea as 'suicidal folly' because the pollution (1) destroys beaches (2) endangers humankind (3) fosters environmental legislation (4) scatters in ocean water

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

INFERENCE QUESTION: draw a conclusion from evidence in the text SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING 'The ways we are nourished by the sea, the ways our lives benefit from the sea—materially as well as spiritually—are nearly infinite. And we are well on our way to ruining it all.' The speaker labels mankind’s pollution of the sea as 'suicidal folly' because the pollution (1) destroys beaches (2) endangers humankind (3) fosters environmental legislation (4) scatters in ocean water

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING As used in the text, the phrase 'fouling the breeding grounds' means (1) draining them (2) cultivating them (3) flooding them (4) dirtying them

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

VOCABULARY QUESTION: Can you guess the word’s meaning from the context? SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING 'rains wash soil into rivers and streams and out to sea, fouling the breeding grounds' As used in the text, the phrase 'fouling the breeding grounds' means (1) draining them (2) cultivating them (3) flooding them (4) dirtying them

Slide20: 

TASK TELLS YOU WHAT TO DO Your Task: Write a presentation for students in your school on saving the ocean environment as a way of persuading students to join the environmental club. SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING: 

SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING GUIDELINES remind you of the five standards! Tell your audience what they need to know about saving the ocean environment (MEANING) Use specific, accurate, and relevant information from the speech to support your discussion (DETAILS) Organize your ideas in a logical and coherent manner (ORGANIZATION) Use a tone and level of language appropriate for a report for a health class (LANGUAGE) Follow the conventions of standard written English (CONVENTIONS)

Slide22: 

STUDENT INTRODUCTION More mysterious than the far reaches of outer space are earth’s oceans. Very little was known about this vast, unexplored wonderland until the 1970s. Even though our knowledge has greatly expanded, we are still naïve and ignorant about the complexities of our oceans, and human practices are threatening to destroy this mysterious wonderland before we can learn about it. We need to be more environmentally aware and active to reverse the devastation. SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING

Slide23: 

STUDENT BODY ¶ Human activities also cause damage to many other marine organisms. For every pound of shrimp caught, three pounds of other sea life caught in the shrimp nets are discarded. A fishery in Newfoundland had to close down because of overfishing of salmon and bass. Human waste leaks or is dumped into the ocean, changing the natural nitrogen and phosphorous levels, and leading to destructive algae blooms. Cars traveling along the edges of waterways cause oil residue to run off into the water. When buildings are constructed along a coastline, habitats are destroyed, along with millions of organisms. These devastating effects on the ocean environment will eventually destroy our own prosperity. SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING

Slide24: 

STUDENT CONCLUSION Human ignorance and actions threaten to deprive us of the great mystery that is the sea. To reverse the harmful effects, we need to be better informed about the causes of marine destruction and the effects our actions have on the oceanic world. Join the fight to save our ocean environment, and you may also help save human existence. SESSION 1, PART A—LISTENING

Slide25: 

Session 1 Part B Begins here…

SESSION 1—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING: 

DIRECTIONS: WHAT YOU WILL READ andamp; DO SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING Directions: Read the text and study the chart on the following pages, answer the multiple-choice questions, and write a response based on the situation described below.You may use the margins to take notes as you read and scrap paper to plan your response.

SESSION 1—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING: 

The Situation: Your state senator is preparing to vote on a bill that would ban the use of vending machines in all New York State schools. Write a letter to your state senator recommending whether he/she should vote for or against the bill and explaining the reasons for your position. SITUATION ('LET’S PRETEND') SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING

SESSION 1—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING: 

READ THE TEXT FOR IDEAS The food industry says children need more exercise, not fewer choices. The bills have also angered school administrators nationwide, intensifying an already heated debate over the prevalence of commercialism in the education system. SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING

SESSION 1—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING: 

READ THE TEXT FOR FACTS Researchers vacillate, pointing out that children are eating more of almost everything, not just sweets, while exercising less. In fact, only 29 percent of students attended daily physical education classes in 1999, compared with 42 percent in 1991, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, making it harder for them to burn off the extra calories they have put on. SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING

SESSION 1—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING: 

SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING INTERPRET THE TABLE, CHART, OR MAP

SESSION 1—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING: 

SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING Use the article for main idea and support points (plus details) Use data from the chart for additional support SECRETS OF PART B

SESSION 1—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING: 

SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING Highlight or underline ideas Vending machines have become a principal source of extra money for districts across the nation, bringing in hundreds of millions of dollars for extracurricular activities each year. With dozens of machines lining their hallways, some schools annually earn $50,000 or more in commissions, then use the money for marching bands, computer centers and field trips that might otherwise fall by the wayside. To keep such programs going, schools are emerging as the staunchest opponents of the proposed restrictions, invoking the same principles of local control that the states themselves use to fight federal standards for academic testing.

SESSION 1—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING: 

SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING Even some students express concern over the abundance of snack foods in their schools. Nell S. Geiser, a 17-year-old senior at New Vista High School in Boulder, Colo., says the vending machines in the building never shut down. At 7:30 a.m., outside classrooms with corporate symbols like I.B.M. painted on the walls, she says her fellow students gather in front of the humming machines, comparing schedules on daily planners with logos of the WB network, courtesy of a local television station. Highlight or underline facts

Slide34: 

SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING Draw conclusions from table Vending machines are more available to high school students Most schools offer lunch items other than from National School Lunch Program

Slide35: 

THE QUESTIONS ('SCAFFOLDING') SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING According to the text, the proposed California law (lines 9 through 11) would prohibit the sale of (1) junk food in elementary schools (2) milk or juice in elementary schools (3) soft drinks in high schools (4) soft drinks in elementary schools

Slide36: 

FACT QUESTION: Did you read accurately? 'In California, legislators appear close to passing a law that would prohibit any drinks but milk, water or juice from being sold in elementary schools.' SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING According to the text, the proposed California law (lines 9 through 11) would prohibit the sale of (1) junk food in elementary schools (2) milk or juice in elementary schools (3) soft drinks in high schools (4) soft drinks in elementary schools

Slide37: 

TABLE QUESTION! SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING According to the chart, more elementary schools than middle schools allow their students to hold fund-raisers use vending machines (3) visit snack bars (4) leave for lunch

Slide38: 

You need to find and interpret data! SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING According to the chart, more elementary schools than middle schools allow their students to hold fund-raisers use vending machines (3) visit snack bars (4) leave for lunch

Slide39: 

SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING According to the text, contracts between schools and soda companies may pressure schools to (1) ignore existing legislation (2) become creative fund-raisers (3) reduce variety in cafeterias (4) raise beverage prices

Slide40: 

INFERENCE QUESTION: Can you draw a conclusion from the text? '… agreements between schools and soda companies sometimes deter principals from following state policy, especially since how much schools make is often tied to how much they sell.' SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING According to the text, contracts between schools and soda companies may pressure schools to (1) ignore existing legislation (2) become creative fund-raisers (3) reduce variety in cafeterias (4) raise beverage prices

Slide41: 

Your Task: Using relevant information from both documents, write a write a letter to your state senator in which you recommend whether he/she should vote for or against the bill banning the use of vending machines in New York State schools and explain the reasons for your position. Write only the body of the letter.* THE TASK TELLS YOU WHAT TO DO SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING *This means don’t write the salutation ('Dear …') or close ('Sincerely'). It DOESN’T mean skip the introduction and conclusion of the essay!!

Slide42: 

STUDENT INTRODUCTION As you well know, Senator, vending machines have become a problem in schools that can no longer be ignored. However, I ask you to consider voting against the pending bill to ban all vending machines from schools. With school budgets being cut, vending machines provide many schools with much-needed income. SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING

Slide43: 

STUDENT BODY ¶--INFO. FROM ARTICLE Several studies have shown that vending machines serve as a major source of extracurricular income. If they were to be removed entirely, art, sports, and music programs could suffer. According to a New York Times article by Greg Winter, some schools earn $50,000 or more in commissions each year and use the money for activities outside the classroom, such as marching bands, computer centers, and field trips. Robert E. Meeks, legislative director for the Minnesota School Boards Association, reveals that Minnesota schools earn roughly $40 million a year from vending machines. SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING

Slide44: 

STUDENT BODY ¶--INFO. FROM CHART A chart showing foods offered in schools points to further problems with anti-vending machine reasoning. Ninety-two percent of all school cafeterias offer a la carte options such as pizza, candy, and French fries. If the cafeteria sells items as non-nutritious as vending machines, what will banning the machines accomplish? SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING

Slide45: 

STUDENT CONCLUSION Passing a bill such as this could severely damage a school’s income and will do little to address the problem of childhood obesity. Again, I ask that you vote against this bill and instead push vending machine reform and an increase in physical education and exercise programs. SESSION 1—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR UNDERSTANDING

Slide46: 

Session 2 Part A Reading and Writing for Literary Response

SESSION 2—PART AREADING & WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE: 

DIRECTIONS: WHAT YOU WILL READ andamp; DO (THERE IS NO 'SITUATION') SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE Directions: Read the passages on the following pages (a poem and an excerpt from a memoir). Write the number of the answer to each multiple-choice question on your answer sheet. Then write the essay in your essay booklet as described in Your Task. You may use the margins to take notes as you read and scrap paper to plan your response.

SESSION 2—PART AREADING & WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE: 

READ BOTH PASSAGES FIRST Lineage My grandmothers were strong. They followed plows and bent to toil. They moved through fields sowing seed. They touched earth and grain grew. They were full of sturdiness and singing. My grandmothers were strong. Margaret Walker from For My People, 1942 Yale University Press SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE

SESSION 2—PART AREADING & WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE: 

READ BOTH PASSAGES FIRST With my grandmother there was a brief ritual phrase in her dialect mouthed by us children when we went to the old Queen Anne style house in Utica where my mother and all her brothers and sisters grew up. My grandmother was always in the kitchen, dressed in black, standing at a large black coal range stirring soup or something. My brothers and I, awkward in the presence of her foreignness, would be pushed in her direction by our mother during those holiday visits, and told 'Go say hello to Gramma.' Helen Barolini, from 'How I Learned to Speak Italian' Southwest Review, Winter 1997 SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE

SESSION 2—PART AREADING & WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE: 

Highlight or underline important details SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE We’d go to the strange old woman who didn’t look like any of the grandmothers of our friends or like any of those on the covers of the Saturday Evening Post around Thanksgiving time. Gramma didn’t stuff a turkey or make candied sweet potatoes and pumpkin pies. She made chicken soup filled with tiny pale meatballs and a bitter green she grew in her backyard along with broad beans and basil, things that were definitely un-American in those days. Her smell was like that of the cedar closet in our attic. She spoke strange words with a raspy sound.

SESSION 2—PART AREADING & WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE: 

SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE Write ideas in the margin Grandmothers worked hard in the field—slaves? Still they were positive. My grandmothers were strong. They followed plows and bent to toil. They moved through fields sowing seed. They touched earth and grain grew. They were full of sturdiness and singing. My grandmothers were strong.

Slide52: 

QUESTIONS ('SCAFFOLDING') SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE The comparison between the Native American chief and the grandmother (line 45) characterizes her as (1) courageous (2) respected (3) intelligent (4) kind

Slide53: 

INFERENCE: Draw a conclusion from the evidence SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE The comparison between the Native American chief and the grandmother (line 45) characterizes her as (1) courageous (2) respected (3) intelligent (4) kind 'She sat there as silently as a Sioux chief and was served food, given babies to kiss, and paid homage to all day.'

Slide54: 

SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE Both passages reveal the theme of (1) grandparents’ trust (2) generational difference (3) social conflict (4) family rivalry

Slide55: 

THEME: What is the main idea? SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE Both passages reveal the theme of (1) grandparents’ trust (2) generational difference (3) social conflict (4) family rivalry Both passages feature granddaughters talking about grandmothers

Slide56: 

SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE In order to emphasize her feelings about her grandmothers, the narrator uses (1) repetition (2) onomatopoeia (3) simile (4) symbolism

Slide57: 

LITERARY TERMS: make sure you study them! SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE 'My grandmothers were strong' In order to emphasize her feelings about her grandmothers, the narrator uses (1) repetition (2) onomatopoeia (3) simile (4) symbolism

Slide58: 

Your Task: After you have read the passages and answered the multiple-choice questions, write a unified essay about the influence of grandmothers as revealed in the passages. In your essay, use ideas from both passages to establish a controlling idea about the influence of grandmothers. Using evidence from each passage, develop your controlling idea and show how the author uses specific literary elements or techniques to convey that idea. THE TASK TELLS YOU WHAT TO DO SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE

Slide59: 

Regents Speak Translations A 'CONTROLLING IDEA' is the same as a thesis statement or main idea. It’s the point you’re making. You use details from the passages to help you make this point LITERARY ELEMENTS: specific examples of theme, characterization, setting, point of view LITERARY TECHNIQUES: such as symbolism, irony, simile (you don’t have to NAME the technique, just show how it’s used) A 'UNIFIED ESSAY' means that you use evidence from BOTH passages to support and develop ONE controlling idea

Slide60: 

SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE STUDENT INTRODUCTION Grandmothers who have endured life’s experiences are influential people. Because of their work ethic and moral fiber, the grandmothers in Passage I and Passage 2 serve as models of honor and responsibility for their granddaughters. These granddaughters have gained respect for the lessons their grandmothers have imparted, and can appreciate the demands of the past that made their grandmothers’ lives different. establishes controlling idea

Slide61: 

STUDENT BODY ¶ In Passage 1, the speaker emphasizes the strength that her grandmothers possessed, structuring her poem around repetition of this concept, in 'My grandmothers were strong.' The speaker concludes the poem with a rhetorical question, asking 'Why am I not as they?' The narrator questions why she is different from her grandmothers and fears that she has failed to show the hard work and strength she sees in her ancestors. develops controlling idea with details andamp; reference to literary technique SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE

Slide62: 

STUDENT CONCLUSION A family needs a strong leader whose experiences have taught life lessons. In both passages, grandmothers lead by example. Their descendants wonder about them and, though separated by time and customs, these grandchildren remember the strength of their family matriarchs. SESSION 2—PART A READING andamp; WRITING FOR LITERARY RESPONSE

Slide63: 

Session 2 Part B Reading and Writing for Critical Analysis

SESSION 2—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR CRITICAL ANALYSIS: 

TASK: TELLS YOU WHAT TO DO SESSION 2—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR CRITICAL ANALYSIS Write a critical essay in which you discuss two works of literature you have read from the particular perspective of the statement that is provided for you in the Critical Lens. In your essay, provide a valid interpretation of the statement, agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it, and support your opinion using specific references to appropriate literary elements from the two works. You may use scrap paper to plan your response.

SESSION 2—PART BREADING & WRITING FOR CRITICAL ANALYSIS: 

THE 'CRITICAL LENS' IS A QUOTE THAT GIVES YOU THE TOPIC OF THE ESSAY SESSION 2—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR CRITICAL ANALYSIS 'The human heart has ever dreamed of a fairer world than the one it knows.' —Carleton Noyes 'Poetry: General Introduction' from Lectures on the Harvard Classics, 1914

Slide66: 

HOW TO USE THE CRITICAL LENS 'The human heart has ever dreamed of a fairer world than the one it knows.' 1. INTERPRET THE STATEMENT (PARAPHRASE) No matter how bad a situation becomes, people will always hope for a better future. 2. AGREE OR DISAGREE SESSION 2—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR CRITICAL ANALYSIS You may agree totally, disagree totally, or agree AND disagree (using one work for each opinion)

Slide67: 

Write in the main ideas and indicate details SESSION 2—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR CRITICAL ANALYSIS Middle Earth covered in eternal darkness Frodo is optimistic, resolute, and crafty Frodo presses on even though all seems lost. Gatsby yearns for life of culture, money, and elegance. He wins Daisy’s affection with wealth and status Relationship is shattered when Tom Buchanan reveals Gatsby’s unsavory past. Lord of the Rings J.R.R. Tolkien The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald

Slide68: 

STUDENT INTRODUCTION Carleton Noyes once said, 'The human heart has ever dreamed of a fairer world than the one it knows.' The notion that no matter how bad a situation becomes, people will always hope for a better future is supported by J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and Matthew Stover’s Revenge of the Sith. These two works, despite their non-human characters, capture the essence of human hope in dire times. SESSION 2—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR CRITICAL ANALYSIS

Slide69: 

STUDENT BODY ¶ In The Lord of the Rings, Middle Earth is being drawn into wider and wider conflict. Tolkien’s setting is filled with barren wastelands, volcanoes, dark castles, swamps of death, and perilous waterfalls. All the world is covered in darkness and it seems the Dark Lord Sauron will rule forever. Yet in the midst of such turmoil Tolkien places Frodo Baggins, a hobbit characterized as optimistic, resolute, and crafty. Despite the evil surrounding him and the hopelessness of the situation, Frodo and his friends press on to destroy the ring that is the key to Sauron’s power. Even when all seems lost, Frodo still dreams of a world with no Sauron, no ring, and no more darkness. SESSION 2—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR CRITICAL ANALYSIS interprets the lens with detail

Slide70: 

STUDENT CONCLUSION In both The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and Brighton Beach Memoirs by Neil Simon, the characters possess dreams that enhance their lives. Each protagonist tries to implement the American Dream in his own way, showing that in literature as in life, the human heart does 'dream of a fairer world than the one it knows.' SESSION 2—PART B READING andamp; WRITING FOR CRITICAL ANALYSIS

Slide71: 

End! See you next year!

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