harlem ex

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Examples of the Harlem Renaissance: 

Examples of the Harlem Renaissance Mr. Hersch American Studies Grossmont High School

Lois Mailou Jones: 

Lois Mailou Jones Lois Mailou Jones was a pioneering artist of the Harlem Renaissance. Born in New England, her life was still clouded by the prejudices of an everyday African American life. She began her career after attending the School of the Museum of Fine Art in Boston. Afterwards, she went through the racial barriers to exhibit her works to the world. She perservered through many roadblocks and prejudices, without ever losing her passion to express herself through art

Lois Mailou Jones: 

Lois Mailou Jones

Lois Mailou Jones: 

Lois Mailou Jones

Lois Mailou Jones: 

Lois Mailou Jones

William H. Johnson: 

William H. Johnson William H. Johnson entered the Harlem Renaissance during its making. He was educated there for five years, during which he learned from greats such as George Luks and Charles Hawthorne. He then traveled to places in North Africa and Europe to paint and find residence. It was by the suggestion of Hawthorne that he traveled to Paris in 1826, where he settled, painted, and studied the works of modern European masters.

William H. Johnson: 

William H. Johnson

William H. Johnson: 

William H. Johnson

Ben Peyton Hedgeman: 

Ben Peyton Hedgeman Born Peyton Hedgeman, he was given the name Palmer Hayden by his white commanding sergeant during World War I. He studied and painted in France, where he lived for some years.Hayden's reputation emanates from his realistic depictions of folklore and Black historical events. He, like Douglas, was also among the first Black American artists to use African subjects and designs in his painting.

Palmer Hayden: 

Palmer Hayden

Palmer Hayden: 

Palmer Hayden

Palmer Hayden: 

Palmer Hayden

Langston Hughes: 

Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes: 

Langston Hughes I, too, sing America.I am the darker brother. They send me to eat in the kitchen When company comes, But I laugh, And eat well, And grow strong.Tomorrow, I'll be at the table When company comes. Nobody'll dare Say to me, "Eat in the kitchen," Then. Besides, They'll see how beautiful I am And be ashamed -I, too, am America.

Langston Hughes: 

Langston Hughes "Harlem" What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore - And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over - like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does it explode?

W.E. Du Bois: 

W.E. Du Bois

W.E. Du Bois: 

W.E. Du Bois Described variously as the "most outspoken civil rights activist in America," "the undisputed intellectual leader of a new generation of African- American, and "the central authorizing figure for twentieth-century African-American thought," Du Bois was the inspiration for the literary movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. As a co-founder of the NAACP and the long-time editor of its magazine The Crisis, Du Bois nurtured and promoted many young and talented African-Americans. Underlying his controversial notion of "the talented tenth," was his belief that true integration will happen when selected blacks excel in the literature and the fine arts.

Marcus Garvey: 

Marcus Garvey

Marcus Garvey: 

Marcus Garvey "Be assured that I planted well the seed of Negro or black nationalism which cannot be destroyed even by the foul play that has been meted out to me." - MG, First message from Atlanta Penitentiary, 1925.

authorStream Live Help