How Admission Decisions Holiday Plaza

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

How Admissions Decisions Are Made? : 

How Admissions Decisions Are Made? 陳婉秋/Wan IvyClimbing Education Services www.IvyClimbing.com

Which College Is This?: 

Which College Is This? Best liberal art college in the west Average class size is 14 students Sent more students to Harvard Law in 2005 than Brown or Duke Need-blind in admissions Overlaps with Stanford, Harvard, & Yale Engineering plan w. Cal-tech & Wash U. Five-college system (1st quiz!)

Which College Is This?: 

Which College Is This?

Questions & Puzzles: 

Questions & Puzzles Why do colleges make decisions that are sometimes hard to understand? Is there a perfect way to evaluate students? Are there admissions “hooks?” How do public & private colleges make decisions? What information do colleges want from the counselor and the school? Why do colleges with similar standards make different decisions?

Acceptance Rates – Ivy League: 

Acceptance Rates – Ivy League

Acceptance Rates – Highly Selective: 

Acceptance Rates – Highly Selective

As a result of low acceptance rates...: 

As a result of low acceptance rates... Many applicants with strong GPAs and test scores feel that they have been treated “unfairly.”

Common Beliefs: 

Common Beliefs I am the valedictorian of my high school. I have top SAT scores. I am a great athlete and musician. I am my high school class president. I can afford to pay the tuition. I can fill out 20 applications!

Goals for Every College: 

Goals for Every College The ultimate goals for every college are the same: Admit a freshman class with many different dimensions Admit students who will make good use of the available resources Admit students who will help meet the institution’s needs. All schools look for a “national” student body

“What’s the Bottom Line?”: 

“What’s the Bottom Line?” “…Admissions decisions often reflect the effort on the part of an admissions committee to ‘build in’ this diversity, and that sometimes results in some students with better ‘numbers’ (i.e. SAT scores or class ranks) being denied in favor of students who can bring a special talent or geographic, cultural, ethnic background to campus...” Princeton University

“But I’ve Always Had Straight A’s!”: 

“But I’ve Always Had Straight A’s!” “The primary criterion for admission is academic excellence, and the most important single credential is the transcript. Our ablest candidates have mostly “A”s in their courses, but we do find that some students with lower grade averages may show more real promise for strong college level course work than some students with high averages. We find the same may apply with regard to test scores—very high scores, though they may in many cases confirm scholastic promise, do not guarantee admission to Stanford.” Stanford University

Perfect Test Scores?: 

Perfect Test Scores? “In each of the past few years Harvard has received more than 500 applications with double 800 scores and has accepted just under half of them.” Harvard University

“Why Didn’t I Send Him to Mali?”: 

“Why Didn’t I Send Him to Mali?” “You’re a parent watching your child, so proud, and so worried. Your neighbors’ son was a nationally ranked swimmer, straight As, great boards, nice kid. Got rejected at his top three choices, wait-listed at two more. Who gets into Yale these days anyway? Maybe they should have sent him to Mali for the summer to dig wells, fight Malaria, give him something to write about in his essay.” “Who Needs Harvard?” Time Aug. 2006

Reality Check : 

Reality Check 25,000 high schools in the country, each with top ten list of students 250,000 students applying to the same group of 8 Ivies and highly selective schools Top West San Jose and Cupertino students become “typical-looking” in this group Perfect scores on the ACT/SAT not unusual in this group

Admissions Index : 

Admissions Index Academic Profile: Note: 9 is the highest possible score in one area.

Admissions Index : 

Admissions Index Personal Profile:

Test Score Index : 

Test Score Index

Are There Course Requirements for Harvard and Others?: 

Are There Course Requirements for Harvard and Others? The strongest candidates choose rigorous courses. A four-year preparatory program: 4 years of English 4 years of math 4 years of science, with lab 4 years of history/social science 4 years of one foreign language

Course Requirements for UC?: 

Course Requirements for UC? 4 years of English 3 years of math 2 years of science, with lab 2 years of history 2 years of one foreign language Plus: 1 year of visual and performing arts 1 year of college prep electives

Course Requirements for High School Graduation?: 

Course Requirements for High School Graduation? Yes! They vary from school to school. 3 years of English 3 years of math 2 years of science 2 years of history 2 years of one foreign language

Course Requirement Comparison: 

Course Requirement Comparison

Stanford’s Ratings of “Heavy” and “Light”: 

Stanford’s Ratings of “Heavy” and “Light” Student A Extremely Heavy: 36 or 21 solids!

Stanford’s Ratings of “Heavy” and “Light” : 

Stanford’s Ratings of “Heavy” and “Light” Student B Heavy: 25 or 18 solids!

Stanford’s Ratings of “Heavy” and “Light” : 

Stanford’s Ratings of “Heavy” and “Light” Student C Medium: 20 or 14 solids!

Stanford’s Ratings of “Heavy” and “Light” : 

Stanford’s Ratings of “Heavy” and “Light” Student D Light: 13 or 8 solids!

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? The Academic Performances The Evaluative Measures Personal Background Geographic Considerations Extracurricular Activities Extenuating Circumstances Recommendations Fit/match Considerations Education Environment

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Each applicant is given two numerical grades Academic Extracurricular The application is read by two readers. The application is discussed in a subcommittee. The application is discussed in a full committee. A final vote is taken. (Majorities rule!) The Reading Process:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Academic 1: A student who has taken 5–6 solids, has 5-7 scores over 700, probably a 4.0 GPA, and at least 20 solids. (AP schedule) Academic 2: A student who has taken 5-6 solids, has 5-6 scores over 700, probably a 3.9 GPA, and at least 20 solids. (AP/honor schedule) The Reading Process: Academic Scores (1 – 5)

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Non-Academic 1: You must have done something truly exceptional. Non-Academic 2: State and regional accomplishments. Non-Academic 3: Class President; Team Captain; Paper Editor Non-Academic 4: Club VP; Active, but not a leader Non-Academic 5: Little or no achievement The Reading Process: Non-Academic Scores (1 – 5)

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Jason’s Activities: Three years as a member of the French Club, and one year as Vice President, first violin in the orchestra, and two-year as a cashier at a pharmacy. Jennifer’s Activities: One year as a member of the Spanish Club, one year in the band, one year playing on the JV volleyball team, and three months volunteering at the Children’s Discovery Museum. Non-Academic: A Case Study

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? What are the readers looking for? Represent the school council Distribute monthly student publications Sit on committee to improve the quality of food Provide the glue that holds the community together Show a leader’s concern for people other than himself

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Re-calculated academic GPA Pattern of grade improvement in high school Quality of curriculum: Solid college-prep curriculum (4 yrs in each subject) Strength of senior year courses Core courses beyond core curriculum AP, IB, and honors/college courses Test scores (ACT, SAT, II, TOEFL, etc.) Academic interest Class rank Academic Performances:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Re-calculated academic GPA (Scale of 0-4)

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Grade Improvement:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Grade Pattern:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Grade Pattern:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Is it better to take easier courses and get As…?:

“Is a ‘B’ in a Hard Course Better Than an ‘A’ in an Easy Course?”: 

“Is a ‘B’ in a Hard Course Better Than an ‘A’ in an Easy Course?” “Be careful not to assume that the world is divided between students who take difficult courses and get Bs and the students who take easy courses and get As. Most of our applicants are able to take difficult courses and receive As. If you can handle the work in honors and AP, take at least a few of them. If it is obvious from your transcript that you are taking a lighter load than you can handle, admissions officers at selective colleges are going to wonder about your motivation. Grades from the junior and senior year are most important.” Stanford University

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Academic recognition and awards Artistic, writing, and other talent Depth in one or more academic areas of student interests Evidence of academic passion Grasp of world events Independent academic research Intellectual curiosity Writing quality: content, style, originality, risk taking Evaluative Measures:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Alumni, faculty, and staff connections Cultural awareness/experiences Socioeconomic and educational background First generation to go to college Low economic family background Economically disadvantaged region Underrepresented minority Underrepresented high schools Personal disadvantage Academic diversity Military veteran/Peace Corps, American Corps, etc. Personal Background:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? In-State resident Under-represented geographic area From schools with few or no previous applicants Geographic Considerations:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Awards and honors (athletic, artistic, musical, civic) Quality and depth of involvement Leadership Community services Impact student’s involvement had on school and/or community Scholarship athlete Work experience Extracurricular Activities, Services, and Other:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Overcome personal adversity/unusual hardship Language spoken at home/ESL Frequent moves/many different schools Extenuating Circumstances:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Character Civic and cultural awareness/diverse perspective Commitment to high ideals Intellectual independence/enthusiasm for learning/risk taking Creativity/other talent Concern for others/community Motivation/determination/effort/initiative/persistence Leadership potential/maturity/responsibility Recommendations:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Demonstrated interest in college Good match Fit Considerations:

How Applicants Are Evaluated?: 

How Applicants Are Evaluated? Strength of curriculum (incl. availability of AP, IB, Honors) Average SAT I and/or ACT scores Percentage attending 4-year colleges Competitive grading system in high school Competitiveness of class Academically disadvantaged school Educational Environment:

How do you know all of the high schools in the country?: 

How do you know all of the high schools in the country? School information: community, location, study body, faculty School size and graduating class Comparative data on GPA distribution Average test scores Course options, including # of AP and honor courses Extracurricular opportunities College placement information High School Profile:

High School Profile: Silicon Valley High School: 

High School Profile: Silicon Valley High School

High School Profile: Silicon Valley High School: 

High School Profile: Silicon Valley High School

High School Profile: Silicon Valley High School: 

High School Profile: Silicon Valley High School Grade Distribution – Class of 2007 (100 Students)

What’s another name for Ivy League? : 

What’s another name for Ivy League? 2nd Quiz!

A Freshman Class at Harvard: 

A Freshman Class at Harvard

Admitted Student Profile: 

Admitted Student Profile An honor student, Kate Ting was president of her class for three years, captain of the tennis and soccer teams, and president of the National Honor Society. She was co-chairperson of the Citizens' Scholarship Fund and on the school newspaper for three years (editor her junior year). For three years, she participated in the Chemistry Olympiad and the New England Math League, and was a member of the Taconic quiz team. She was presented a leadership award from her community and was selected to study at RPI during the summer…

Admitted Student Profile: 

Admitted Student Profile Sean Yang, who finished first in his class, was the winner of the Archie Roberts Award presented annually to the top scholar/athlete in Western Massachusetts. He was president of the National Honor Society, a member of the Student Council, and a delegate to Boys' State where he was elected to the House of Representatives. A National Merit Scholarship finalist, Sean won the Mass Book Award, and medals for the highest academic achievement in six different subjects. He was an All-Star League defensive back in football…

Admitted Student Profile: 

Admitted Student Profile Jessica Owen who finished third in her class, was the vice-president of the class and the representative to Massachusetts Girls State.  She was the winner of numerous awards including the "Classmates Today/Neighbors Tomorrow" Award, the Bausch & Lomb Science Award, and the College Book Award.  She participated in track & field, was a member of the first place team in the Academic Decathlon, and won the first place for Graphic Art at the National Latin Conference (as well as the silver medal on the national Latin examination).

Admitted Students: Things in Common: 

Admitted Students: Things in Common Scholars Sustained commitment Increased level of responsibility Leadership Sheer ability Positive image

IvyClimbing Advice: 

IvyClimbing Advice Do you have special talents? Academic, non-academic, and personal Do all the pieces of your application fit together? Others see you as you see yourself Would you make a good addition to campus? In the classrooms, labs, dorms, activities, and organizations

Which College is This?: 

Which College is This? Option to take any course pass/fail. Take anything you want. 8-year liberal/medical education (3rd Quiz!)

Which College is This?: 

Which College is This?

Reflections: 

Reflections Top students are denied admission every year This process is an art Look outside your universe Don’t confuse the local with the universal

“Last Minute Thoughts…”: 

“Last Minute Thoughts…” Remember, this college application process is unlike anything you or your kids have experienced. The stress level for applying to college is high.

Look Beyond the Ivies: 

Look Beyond the Ivies “In a kind of virtuous circle, the ‘second tier’ schools got better as applications rose and they could become choosier in assembling a class—which in turn raised the quality of the whole experience on campus and made the school more attractive to both topflight professors and the next wave of applicants…”

Look Beyond the Ivies: 

Look Beyond the Ivies “ ‘Just because you haven’t heard of a college doesn’t mean it’s no good,’ argues Marilee Jones, the admissions dean at the MIT and an outspoken advocate of the idea that parents need to lighten up. ‘Just as you have changed and grown since college, colleges are changing and growing.’ ” “Who Needs Harvard?” Time Aug. 2006

Interesting Facts : 

Interesting Facts Only 7 CEO’s from the current top 50 Fortune 500 companies were Ivy League undergraduates. “Who Needs Harvard?” Time Aug. 2006

The Reality of It All: 

The Reality of It All “You are being judged according to criteria that you would never use to judge another person and which will never again be applied to you once you leave higher education…” “Who Needs Harvard?” Time Aug. 2006

The Reality of It All: 

The Reality of It All “For example, colleges are taking a hard look at your SAT scores. But if at any moment in your later life you so much as mention your SAT scores in conversation, you will be considered a total jerk. If at age 40 you are still proud of your scores, you may want to contemplate a major life makeover...” “Who Needs Harvard?” Time Aug. 2006

To Rising Seniors: 

To Rising Seniors So remember, the letters you start to get in mid-December don’t determine anything!

More IvyClimbing Advice: 

More IvyClimbing Advice Look for a good fit – Challenges you, makes you stretch, allows you to grow Don’t go to a place where you’ll have to study 24/7 just to keep up

Final Words of Wisdom: 

Final Words of Wisdom Keep an open mind Don’t take shortcuts Be realistic, but don’t be afraid to aim high Don’t rely on myths, rumors or anecdotes Don’t stereotype people or colleges Seek advice, but make up your own mind Make appointments with your counselor

More Words: 

More Words Don’t rule out a college because of cost Be yourself (ok, yourself at your best) Keep things in perspective Have a sense of humor Make sure your application is your own work, but seek out feedback from adults Read the instructions first

Keep in Mind…: 

Keep in Mind… You are probably far more interesting just as you are, than any “ideal applicant” you are likely to imagine colleges are looking for College is really a 7 year experience in terms of those you will meet – Those in your freshman class – Those in the three classes ahead of you – Those in the three classes that follow your class

And finally…: 

And finally… Keep in mind that no matter which college you attend, it’s a good idea to remember that “Batteries Are Not Included” and “Assembly is Required.” However much you sweat over the college admissions process, be sure to take the long view. Nowhere is it written that life begins or ends with the college admission process!

Thank you for coming! Any questions? To join Mailing List, go to: www.IvyClimbing.com Email: help@IvyClimbing.com : 

Thank you for coming! Any questions? To join Mailing List, go to: www.IvyClimbing.com Email: help@IvyClimbing.com

authorStream Live Help