Energy Part 2

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Please turn to Page 4 in your Energy NOTES ©Mark Place, 2009-2010 www.LearnEarthScience.com

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Fahrenheit (°F) Celsius (°C) Kelvin (K) 30 30 330 Temperature Conversion Fill in the chart below using your Earth Science Reference Tables . -1 272 86 135 57 303

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Temperature Conversion Describe the word TEMPERATURE in relation to molecular motion. Cold Hot

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Temperature Conversion What happens to molecular motion at absolute zero? What temperature is this in all temperature scales? At absolute zero, all motion stops. 0K -273°C -459°F

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Specific Heat the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of a substance 1°C Please go to Page 1 of the Earth Science Reference Tables .

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Specific Heat Why does water heat up and cool down slower than land? it has a higher specific heat

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Specific Heat If you heated equal masses of basalt and lead, which one would record a faster increase in temperature? Explain how you know. the lead because it has a lower specific heat

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Specific Heat Which Earth material has the greatest specific heat? liquid water

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solid liquid gas vaporization (+540 Cal) condensation ( -540 Cal) melting (+80 Cal) solidification (-80 Cal) Heat added Temperature ( o C) Heating Curve for Water 0 100 Heat lost Draw the graph of water heating. Label the following terms in their correct places: condensation, vaporization, solidification, melting.

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Check the box which describes whether energy is gained or lost for each process. Process Energy Gained Energy Lost Condensation Evaporation Melting Solidification How many calories are gained or lost by water for each of the following processes? Process Calories Gained Calories Lost Condensation Evaporation Melting Solidification 80 80 540 540

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