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Slide1: 

Where Healthcare Meets Policy

Slide2: 

The Red Cross: Then and Now

What Is the Red Cross?: 

What Is the Red Cross? Complex history Grounding principles Relevance in a troubled world Few understand its: Source of Images: American Red Cross

The Red Cross Movement Sprung to Life as a Global, Humanitarian Effort: 

The Red Cross Movement Sprung to Life as a Global, Humanitarian Effort 1859 – Henri Dunant of Switzerland Sources: International Red Cross and Red Crescent Logo Courtesy of International Red Cross and Red Crescent. American Red Cross. Museum. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/museum/history/pre1900_a.asp. Accessed April 14, 2005 Organized local townspeople to care for 40,000 dying on a battlefield in Solferino, Italy 1863 - International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement 1864 – Signed by 12 nations Geneva Conventions

Understanding the Two Movements : 

Understanding the Two Movements Sources: International Red Cross and Red Crescent Logo, Courtesy of International Red Cross and Red Crescent. American Red Cross. Museum. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/museum/history/pre1900_a.asp. Accessed April 14, 2005. American Red Cross Museum. Frequently Asked Questions About Our History. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/museum/history/geneva.asp. Accessed April 14, 2005. American Red Cross Fundamentals of Instructor Training Participant’s Manual. American Red Cross. August, 2000. Society of Professional Journalists. A Brief History of the Laws of War. Available at: http://www.globalissuesgroup.com/geneva/history.html. Accessed April 14, 2005. International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement Dedicated to the impartial, neutral, and independent voluntary service of those in need National chapters committed to people inside and outside own borders Geneva Conventions Policy Initiative Agreement to protect signature countries’ sick, wounded, captured soldiers during wartime - Humane treatment - War zone evacuation - No cruel/unusual punishment

Twenty Years Later, They Arrived in the U.S. : 

Twenty Years Later, They Arrived in the U.S. 1869 - 1873 – Clara Barton visited Europe May 12, 1881 – Barton and 14 others discussed establishing a Red Cross May 21, 1881 – 51 people signed the constitution of the American Red Cross June 9, 1881 – Clara Barton was elected its president June, 1900 – American Red Cross received its first federal charter Sources: Photo, Courtesy of the American Red Cross. American Red Cross. Museum. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/museum/history/pre1900_a.asp. Accessed April 14, 2005. It might have taken much longer if not for the efforts of Clara Barton Red Cross: Europe to America Timeline

It Endorsed a Non-Governmental Agency : 

It Endorsed a Non-Governmental Agency Furnish volunteer aid to sick and wounded families in time of war Provide voluntary relief and a medium of communication for U.S. Military Carry on a system of national and international relief in peacetime Devise means of preventing disasters Sources: Photo, Courtesy of the American Red Cross. American Red Cross. Museum. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/museum/history/pre1900_a.asp. Accessed April 14, 2005. Terms of the American Red Cross Charter

Red Cross Governance Has Evolved: 

Red Cross Governance Has Evolved 1905 – 18-member Committee 12 appointed by U.S. president (including chair) 1947 – 50-member Board of Governors 8 appointed by U.S. president (including chair) 30 appointed by state and territorial chapters 12 appointed by Board of Governors Sources: Photo, Courtesy of the American Red Cross. American Red Cross. Museum. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/museum/history/pre1900_a.asp. Accessed April 14, 2005. President Truman signs 1947 charter

The American Red Cross: Six Lines of Service: 

The American Red Cross: Six Lines of Service Disaster Services: Food, shelter, health support to 67,000 calamities Armed Forces Emergency Services: 1.2 million communications between military and loved ones Biomedical Services: Blood and tissue provided to 3,000+ U.S. hospitals Health and Safety Services: Direct health services for 2.6 million; 12 million trained in first aid and CPR Community Services: 21 million volunteer acts International Services: 40+ global relief efforts Six Lines of Service (2004 Numbers) Sources: American Red Cross Museum. Frequently Asked Questions About Our History. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/museum/history/geneva.asp. American Red Cross Fundamentals of Instructor Training Participant’s Manual. American Red Cross. August, 2000. American Red Cross: Volunteer Services. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/services/volunteer/0,1082,0_325_,00.html. Accessed April 14, 2005. American Red Cross: About Us. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/aboutus/. Accessed April 14, 2005. American Red Cross: Disaster Services. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/0,1082,0_319_,00.html. Accessed April 14, 2005.

The Numbers Reflect the Need and Challenge: 

The Numbers Reflect the Need and Challenge 1 of 175 national societies 1,000 chapters 30,000 employees 1 million volunteers 2004 Revenue: $3.1 Billion 73% - sale of blood products, provision of services 22% - contributions 5% - investment income 2004 Expenses: $3.2 Billion Biomedical 67% U.S. Disasters 8% Health/Safety 7% Community Services 4% Armed Forces 2% International Relief 2% Fundraising 3% Management 5% Source: American Red Cross 2004 Annual Report. Available at: http://www.redcross.org/pubs/car04/A501_04ARinsert.pdf. Accessed April 14, 2005. American Red Cross

It’s Useful to Reflect On the Original Principles: 

It’s Useful to Reflect On the Original Principles Humanity International Red Cross and Red Crescent Principles Protect and respect life. Promote understanding, friendship, cooperation, lasting peace Impartiality No discrimination as to nationality, race, religion, class or political opinion Neutrality May not take sides in hostilities Voluntary Service Voluntary relief movement with no desire for personal gain Universality All societies have equal status and equal responsibility to help each other worldwide Source: American Red Cross Fundamentals of Instructor Training Participant’s Manual. American Red Cross. August, 2000. Independence Maintain autonomy from sponsoring governments

Slide12: 

Where Healthcare Meets Policy Release Date: 4/20/2005 www.healthpolitics.com The Red Cross: Then and Now