playingwithliterature

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Magical Literary Tour: 

Magical Literary Tour Roll up for the literary tour Roll up

Slide2: 

Dead excited about the new term, New opportunities to try new things out and new approaches Great to give my students lots of motivating, stimulating things to do in class Not school again Am a bit bored with teaching English Dunno if I’m in the right job On a scale of 1 to 5 where would you rate yourself (5 = dead excited 1= totally lacking in motivation)

Is it half full or half empty?: 

Is it half full or half empty? Any new term’s resolutions? Gonna try out anything new? Gonna be tempted into experimenting with different things?

Just let me take you back to July in England for a bit: 

Just let me take you back to July in England for a bit

Everywhere you go, always take the weather with you: 

Everywhere you go, always take the weather with you The need for pupils to drink water is being re-emphasised Dozens of schools in England are closing or sending pupils home early because of soaring temperatures

Slide7: 

In the classroom: if there are any blinds or curtains, pull them over night and throughout the day to cool the room ask the headteacher/college manager about hiring air conditioning units if the headteacher agrees, keep bottles/jugs of water for yourself and pupils

If you can’t stand the heat……: 

If you can’t stand the heat……

'Wilting at desks': 

'Wilting at desks' The head teacher at Scarcroft School - where temperatures have reached 32C (90F) in some classrooms - has told parents it will close at lunchtime on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Animals also tried to cool off. At zoos, keepers tried to make life more comfortable for the animals, handing out fruit or blood-flavoured ice lollies.

Pinky and Perky, of Pennywell Farm, near Buckfastleigh, get carrot lollies. : 

Pinky and Perky, of Pennywell Farm, near Buckfastleigh, get carrot lollies.

Mad dogs and Englismen go out in the midday sun.: 

Mad dogs and Englismen go out in the midday sun.

The mad dog and the Englishman at Balaton!: 

The mad dog and the Englishman at Balaton!

Beck’s speedos v Blair’s florals, spot the differences! : 

Beck’s speedos v Blair’s florals, spot the differences!

Tongue twisters: 

Tongue twisters Whether the weather be fine, Or whether the weather be not, Whether the weather be cold, Or whether the weather be hot, We'll weather the weather, Whatever the weather, Whether we like it or not.

So how’s the old eyesight?: 

So how’s the old eyesight?

Playing with literature: 

Playing with literature And thinking a bit too And learning English And becoming more aware of language in general and how it works And having fun

Lengiz - Books in all Branches of Knowledge : 

Lengiz - Books in all Branches of Knowledge

Alexander Rodchenko: 

Alexander Rodchenko Rodchenko’s advert for books and reading                    Born: Dec. 5, 1891, St.Petersburg. Died: Dec 3.,1956, Moscow.

Mark Andrews: 

Mark Andrews Andrews’s advert for books and reading, developing the imagination and having fun. Born: May 16, 1957, Birmingham, England

When I was 16!: 

When I was 16!

Slide23: 

And if you studied from this Longman book in 1963 you may have done a lot about Charles Dickens and got interested in London!

Slide24: 

And if you studied from this Tankönyvkiadó book in 1968 you might have been inspired to read Dante, Calvino, Levi and Umberto Saba and go to Italy!

Slide25: 

And if you studied from this Longman book you might be inspired to go to Britian, go to Vienna, read Graham Greene, go to Geneva and read Mary Shelley!

With literature spots like Graham Greene’s: 

With literature spots like Graham Greene’s

And Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: 

And Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

The Historical Context : 

The Historical Context So where have we come from? Literature used to be taught as a body of knowledge to study rather than be seen as an important resource for language learning.

To be or not to be?: 

To be or not to be? Learners may have been able to quote Shakespeare, Milton and Wordsworth at the end of their studies, but they could not speak the language in real life situations.

No Literature: 

No Literature As a reaction to such teaching practices, supporters of so-called functional approaches made a case for the exclusion of literature from language learning

And our own worries: 

And our own worries I’m not a literature person I don’t know much about literature Not really into that sort of thing

“Sorry, it’s of no use, and it’s not practical”: 

“Sorry, it’s of no use, and it’s not practical” Literature was excluded by arguing that the study of literature was too far removed from the practical needs of the learners.

Oversimplified texts: 

Oversimplified texts In terms of content, the texts used were rather simple and predictable, thus posing no real intellectual challenge to the learner.

“Gyurrika okos madárr”: 

“Gyurrika okos madárr” This often led to rather mechanical forms of language learning leaving little space for student involvement. The legacy of audio-lingualism.

No literature without language and no language without literature: 

No literature without language and no language without literature So……. literature with a small “l”

Literature with a small “l”: 

Literature with a small “l”

What literature with a small “l” isn’t : 

What literature with a small “l” isn’t It shouldn’t be the exposure of students to literary texts which we as teachers, in our 'missionary' role, feel will do them good in some ill-defined way. Read Virginia Woolf cos she will do you good!

Beowulf to Virginia Woolf! : 

Beowulf to Virginia Woolf! In other words it’s not about getting students to read things to make them morally better people! It’s not about “doing the literary canon” from beginning to end.

What literature with a small “l” is: 

What literature with a small “l” is The selection of texts which are not normally considered to be literary, like signs, adverts and jokes, newspaper headlines and all examples of verbal play.

Washing machines: 

Washing machines AUTOMATIC WASHING MACHINES: PLEASE REMOVE ALL YOUR CLOTHES WHEN THE LIGHT GOES OUT

Toilets: 

Toilets TOILET OUT OF ORDER PLEASE USE FLOOR BELOW

Her majesty suffers as Britain heads for 102f scorcher: 

Her majesty suffers as Britain heads for 102f scorcher It Ain't Half Hot Mum was a British situation comedy about a concert party, set in Burma towards the end of the Second World War

Identifying ambiguities: 

Identifying ambiguities

If I said you had a beautiful body would you hold it against me?: 

If I said you had a beautiful body would you hold it against me? coping with ambiguous language use may develop the skills students need in their everyday lives in general

And………: 

And……… to deal with more complex literary texts than slippery pedestrians.

Humpty Dumpty: 

Humpty Dumpty 'When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said, it means just what I choose it to mean, neither more nor less.'

Slide49: 

'The question is,' said Alice, 'whether you can make words mean so many different things.'

Angry verbs: 

Angry verbs so after a minute Humpty Dumpty began again. 'They've a temper, some of them - particularly verbs

Slide51: 

they're the proudest - adjectives you can do anything with, but not verbs - however, I can manage the whole lot of them!

E.E.Cummings: 

E.E.Cummings yes is……. a pleasant country if's…… wintry (my lovely) let's open the year

Clockwork Orange Strange Vocabulary: 

Clockwork Orange Strange Vocabulary Nadsat is a teen language spoken by Alex and his 'droogs' in the futuristic world of A Clockwork Orange.

Anthony Burgess: 

Anthony Burgess The word 'nadsat' itself is the suffix of Russian numerals from 11 to 19 (-надцать).

Making words up: 

Making words up droog - friend (Russian: друг) britva - razor (Russian: бритва) chelloveck - person, man (Russian: человек)

A Clockwork Orange: 

A Clockwork Orange “My glazzies were stuck together real horrorshow with sleepglue, I thought I would not go to school. I thought how I would have a malenky bit longer in the bed slooshy the radio or read the gazetta.”

Slide57: 

glazz - eye horrorshow - good, well malenky - little, tiny sloosh, slosshy - to hear, to listen gazetta – newspaper

Slide58: 

In homes, a haunted apparatus sleeps, that snores when you pick it up. If the ghost cries, they carry it to their lips and soothe it to sleep with sounds. And yet they wake it up deliberately, by tickling with a finger.

Slide59: 

A Martian sends a postcard home Craig Raine

Making the familiar strange: 

Making the familiar strange

Oscar said…….: 

Oscar said…….

In a “Picture of Dorian Gray”: 

In a “Picture of Dorian Gray” There’s only one thing worse than being talked about and that’s not being talked about

Selection of short texts: 

Selection of short texts the language competence needed for understanding literary texts can be built up through shorter and less complex texts.

Text types: 

Text types These can be proverbs, one-liners, idioms, newspaper headlines and advertisements.

Slide65: 

I can resist everything except temptation One should never trust a woman who tells one her real age

Slide66: 

It is only shallow people who judge by appearances There is no sin except stupidity

Oscar! What can you do with these one- liners? : 

Oscar! What can you do with these one- liners? Well Mark, ask your students for arguments For and against ( Discussion) True or False (Evaluation)

Slide68: 

Who is trying to convince who? (Point of View) Where is the contradiction? (Interpretation) Is it humourous, true, both or neither (Opinion)

This little piggy: 

This little piggy This little piggy went to market This little piggy stayed at home This little piggy had roast beef This little piggy had none And this little piggy cried wee wee wee all the way home

Slide70: 

I know an old lady who swallowed a fly, I don't know why she swallowed a fly. Perhaps she'll die!

I know an old lady: 

I know an old lady who swallowed a spider That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her. She swallowed the spider to catch the fly I don't know why she swallowed a fly. Perhaps she'll die!

I know an old lady…..: 

I know an old lady….. who swallowed a bird How ……..? absurd to swallow a bird. She swallowed the bird to catch the spider, she swallowed the spider to catch the fly I don't know why she swallowed a fly. Perhaps she'll die!

Slide73: 

I know an old lady who swallowed a cat Fancy that, She swallowed a cat. She swallowed the cat to..

Slide74: 

I know an old lady who swallowed a dog Oh what a hog to swallow a dog. She……………..

Slide75: 

I know an old lady who swallowed a goat She just opened her throat and swallowed a goat! She…….

Slide76: 

I know an old lady who swallowed a cow I don’t know how she swallowed a cow.

Slide77: 

I know an old lady who swallowed a horse. She's dead of course!

s sz sz SZ sz SZ sz ZS zs ZS zs zs z : 

s sz sz SZ sz SZ sz ZS zs ZS zs zs z The siesta of a Hungarian snake Edwin Morgan

Slide79: 

Sssnnnwhuffffll? Hnwhuffl hhnnwfl hnfl hfl? Gdroblboblhobngbl gbl gl g g g g glbgl. Drublhaflablhaflubhafgabhaflhafl fl fl - gm grawwwww grf grawf awfgm graw gm. Hovoplodok - doplodovok - plovodokot - doplodokosh? Splgraw fok fok splgrafhatchgabrlgabrl fok splfok! Zgra kra gka fok! Grof grawff gahf? Gombl mbl bl - blm plm, blm plm, blm plm, blp

The Loch Ness Monster’s Song: 

The Loch Ness Monster’s Song

Slide81: 

40- Middle Couple Ten when game and go the will be tween LOVE Aged Playing nis the ends they home net still be them

Involvement: 

Involvement Students actively participate in making the poem mean.

Slide83: 

They do not simply respond to an already complete poem, they are involved in its construction.

Like Nadal, poetry in motion: 

Like Nadal, poetry in motion It is not simply a finished product, something to react to, but it is presented as a process.

Using extracts from novels: 

Using extracts from novels

The Line of Beauty: 

The Line of Beauty

Slide87: 

‘If you’re sure you don’t mind’ he added. ‘That’s all right, my friend,’ said Leo quietly, so that Nick had the impression there was someone else there.

Slide88: 

‘I’d still really like to meet you.’ There was a pause before Leo said, ‘Absolutely’ ‘Well, what about the weekend?’ ‘No. The weekend I cannot do,’

Slide89: 

‘Next week?’ he said with a shrug…. ‘Yeah, going to the Carnival? said Leo.

Notting Hill Carnival: 

Notting Hill Carnival

Slide91: 

‘Perhaps on the Saturday, we’re away over the bank holiday. ‘Let’s go before then.’ Nick longed for the Carnival, but felt that it was Leo’s element.

Slide92: 

‘The best thing is, if you give us a ring next week.’ said Leo. ‘I most certainly will,’ said Nick, pretending he thought all this was positive but feeling miserable.

Slide93: 

‘Look, I’m really sorry about tonight. I’ll make it up to you.’ There was another pause in which he knew his sentence was being decided… but then Leo said in a throaty whisper, You bet you will!

Involvement: 

Involvement Students are more likely to understand texts if they experience them directly and are involved in creating meaning themselves.

Don’t: 

Don’t stand in front of the text: or kill it or kill the students tell, show rather than tell over-prepare, often worse than underpreparing

Don’t: 

Don’t pretend you know all the answers always use texts you know, be prepared to take risks, and share the risk-taking with students

Don’t: 

Don’t worry if not everybody participates all the time impose an interpretation Start off by asking “What does it mean?” And if you are tempted to give these things a try, remember Oscar….

Slide98: 

I can resist everything except temptation

PS, One last thought: 

PS, One last thought There is no harm in having a laugh Being serious is no substitute for being a good teacher! Is it Mark? And what have you got on your feet?

crocs: 

crocs

Slide102: 

Like many others, I was disgusted the first time I saw a pair of Crocs. Then I tried them on. I received a pair for Christmas and have not worn another pair of shoes since. I bought my husband a pair, and when he put them on, he said, "It's like wearing a smile!" :) I liked that.

Slide104: 

Ugly can be beautiful

In a while crocodile: 

In a while crocodile

See you later! And enjoy the conference. mandrews@ludens.elte.hu: 

See you later! And enjoy the conference. mandrews@ludens.elte.hu See you later alligator After a while crocodile See you later alligator After a while crocodile Can't you see you're in my way now Don't you know you cramp my style See you later alligator After a while crocodile See you later alligator So long,that's all, goodbye

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