Effective Communication (exerpts)

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Summary of presentation and training materials. For more, go to www.jeffjorgensen.com

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WORKING EFFECTIVELY WITH PARENTS EXHIBITING SIGNS OF MENTAL ILLNESS : 

WORKING EFFECTIVELY WITH PARENTS EXHIBITING SIGNS OF MENTAL ILLNESS By Jeff Jorgensen Director of Special Education Alexandria School District

WHO’S THE IP? : 

WHO’S THE IP? According to a recent study conducted by the U.S. Department of Health up to 20% of children ages 9 to 17 have a diagnosable mental health disorder. 5% to 9% of these youth are considered SED and are typically served by the nations school systems.

MYTH #1 : 

MYTH #1 Most Difficult People Are Mentally Ill

WORKING EFFECTIVELY WITH PARENTS EXHIBITING SIGNS OF MENTAL ILLNESS : 

WORKING EFFECTIVELY WITH PARENTS EXHIBITING SIGNS OF MENTAL ILLNESS Working with the mentally ill is not about designing appropriate policy or a rigid practice. Working with the mentally ill is a very “person centered” process that will be unique to each individual. Just as we provide unique services to students based on their needs, we will need to recognize parents as unique and move to meet their needs so that we can serve their children.

MYTH #2 : 

MYTH #2 If you could just empathize or sympathize with the parent, you would be able to work with them more effectively.

WORKING EFFECTIVELY WITH PARENTS EXHIBITING SIGNS OF MENTAL ILLNESS : 

WORKING EFFECTIVELY WITH PARENTS EXHIBITING SIGNS OF MENTAL ILLNESS A Strategic Problem Solving Model Recognize the impairment. Study the communication patterns of the individual. Seek out the themes that drive them and their perceived needs. Generate accommodations and adjust your communication style based on your observations. Prepare/Inform your team. Implement Assess Celebrate your success.

A Strategic Problem Solving Model : 

A Strategic Problem Solving Model Recognize the Impairment

A Strategic Problem Solving Model : 

A Strategic Problem Solving Model Study the communication patterns of the individual. We are all generally predictable in our communication patterns.

MYTH #3 : 

MYTH #3 Mentally ill individuals are not in control of their actions. The illness will many times have exactly the opposite effect.

A Strategic Problem Solving Model : 

A Strategic Problem Solving Model Seek out themes that drive them and their perceived needs. All communication is needs based.

MYTH #4 : 

MYTH #4 What a person asks for is synonymous with what they need.

MYTH #5 : 

MYTH #5 Having a good relationship with a mentally ill individual is all you need to communicate effectively.

A Strategic Problem Solving Model : 

A Strategic Problem Solving Model Generate accommodations and adjust your communication style based on your observations.

A Strategic Problem Solving Model : 

A Strategic Problem Solving Model Prepare/Inform your team. Many a plan has failed due to poor preparation or a lack of communication with the necessary people.

A Strategic Problem Solving Model : 

A Strategic Problem Solving Model Implement your plan. Fidelity is critical.

A Strategic Problem Solving Model : 

A Strategic Problem Solving Model Assess. The effectiveness of your intervention can be assessed through direct observation of the individual’s behavior.

A Strategic Problem Solving Model : 

A Strategic Problem Solving Model Celebrate your success! Your team has been through a great deal. They need to be congratulated for their efforts.

MYTH #6 : 

MYTH #6 You should never confront a mentally ill individual because of their fragile nature.

DEFINING MENTAL ILLNESS : 

DEFINING MENTAL ILLNESS Mental illnesses are extremely varied. Some can be quite serious and debilitating. Others may be so mild as to go unnoticed, even by mental health professionals.

DEFINING MENTAL ILLNESS : 

DEFINING MENTAL ILLNESS Adults with mental illness have long been the victims of severe social stigmas, based on the assumption that they had a moral deficiency.

MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS : 

MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS Three Main Categories Mood Disorders Anxiety Disorders Personality Disorders

MOOD DISORDERS : 

MOOD DISORDERS This family of mental health disorders is associated with Depression in all its varied forms including Dysthymia, Cyclothymia and Bipolar conditions.

MOOD DISORDERSTHINGS TO REMEMBER : 

MOOD DISORDERSTHINGS TO REMEMBER People suffering from a Mood Disorder may: Feel close to tears at all times. Demonstrate a lack of interest. Have gone without sleep for days. Be experiencing feelings of worthlessness and excessive guilt. Have difficulties concentrating and making decisions. To communicate effectively:

ANXIETY DISORDERS : 

ANXIETY DISORDERS This family of mental health disorders is associated with conditions like PTSD, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Agoraphobia and various specific phobias.

ANXIETY DISORDERSTHINGS TO REMEMBER : 

ANXIETY DISORDERSTHINGS TO REMEMBER People suffering from an Anxiety Disorder may: Worry excessively about many things. Feel keyed up or on the edge. Have difficulty concentrating. Be irritable. To communicate effectively:

PERSONALITY DISORDERS : 

PERSONALITY DISORDERS A Personality Disorder is an enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior that deviates markedly from the expectations of the individual’s culture, is pervasive and inflexible, has an onset in adolescence or early adulthood, is stable over time, and leads to distress or impairment.

PERSONALITY DISORDERS : 

PERSONALITY DISORDERS Personality Disorders include: Paranoid Personality Disorder Schizoid Personality Disorder Schizotypal Personality Disorder Antisocial Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Histrionic Personality Disorder Narcissistic Personality Disorder Avoidant Personality Disorder Dependent Personality Disorder Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Personality Disorder NOS

PERSONALITY DISORDERSTHINGS TO REMEMBER : 

PERSONALITY DISORDERSTHINGS TO REMEMBER There are no easy answers. These people truly are disabled. Personality Disorders are pervasive and inflexible.

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