Week 3 Presentation PT 1 GEN 300

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GEN/300 Week 3 Presentation : 

GEN/300 Week 3 Presentation Developed and maintained by Julia A. Westlake

The Library: Making it Work for You : 

The Library: Making it Work for You

The Library : 

The Library Finding the “right” information quickly and easily usually comes with practice; however, there are some tricks to speeding up the “practice.” Use the best search tools Read the abstracts Check for reliability Decide whether or not to use the information

The Library : 

The Library Use the best search tools Every search you conduct to find information has unique needs. Do not simply open EBSCO, ProQuest, or Gale and think that a broad search is the best search to find any information. First you must evaluate your needs For what statements do you need support? What type of support do you need? Will it be current events? Research findings? Examples? Which search engine is likely to have the information that fits my needs? Read the search engine descriptions prior to using the service as this will not only allow you to be familiarized with the information but also help reduce the amount of time you spend looking for data.

The Library : 

The Library Use the best search tools The library adds new search engines frequently, so if there is a new engine, take a moment to review the description; you never know when you might need to find information in a particular engine. One of the most recent tools to be added to the library is the “federated search” when you view this search it says “Search” and is located at the top of your library page where you see the list of search engines. The Search is a LIVE search, it searches every piece of information that is currently in the library, at the time you execute your search, unlike Google which searches the internet as it was an hour or two prior to your search. Because the Beta Search is live it can take a few minutes; however, this search looks for data in over 25 of the databases you see when you log into the library’s webpage!

The Library : 

The Library Use the best search tools Let’s say you wanted to find information on conflict resolution strategies for teams. Well we can assume that how individuals interact is a field studied by psychologists, sociologists, and anthropologists. Based on this information the Sage and PsychArticles specialized search engines would best fit our needs if we are searching for research support. But maybe we want to find a newspaper or magazine article to show how teams are working together in the workplace – this search would be better for ProQuest, EBSCO, or Gale. If we wanted information on how academic teams worked together our search would be best conducted in Sage, PsychArticles, or Educational Pathways Now let’s say we were doing a presentation and wanted to include some digital media pieces of teams working together, we would search the ACM Digital Library

The Library : 

The Library Read the abstracts Most articles that you will find have what is called an abstract Essentially, the author has written a summary regarding what the article is all about so that the search engine can place it on the search results page for users to read – this is the purpose of the abstract (this purpose is also why you will not need to include an abstract with your written work – we will discuss this later) When you are reading the abstract look for ways in which the author is presenting information and see if that information aligns with what you are writing about

The Library : 

The Library Article one Rogue faculty members disgrace university! Statistics professor is caught in a book selling scandal with three graduate students. Article two The author conducted a research study to determine if faculty personality and field of study mediated ethical decision-making. Article three According to a recent study, 95% of universities have revised their faculty handbooks to include new policies which address technology, behavior, grading, and student-faculty interaction. This study explores why the policies were adopted, how they were written, and how well the policies have been received by students and faculty. Read the abstracts For example, let’s say I am writing all about academic ethics for faculty members and I get the search results to the right. If I need an example of ethics or why ethics are important I could use article 1. Article 2 could help me to support my point regarding the need to set standards for faculty. Article 3 provides more of a fact based approach.

The Library : 

The Library Check for reliability Who are the authors? Are they credible? How did the authors get their information? Is the information opinion or fact? Is the information from one person’s perspective or many?

The Library : 

The Library Check for reliability Who published the article or source? Is the source credible? Is the source Peer-Reviewed? Click on the source to see (Academic journals and “peer-reviewed” sources are considered “top quality”

The Library : 

The Library Decide whether or not to use the information Ask yourself these questions Does the information add to my point? Does the information help me make my point? Is the information credible? Is this information the best I can get? Do I understand exactly what the author is saying all the way through their work? Can I paraphrase what the author is saying and still retain the point? (Quoting is used very rarely so you want to be sure that you can put the author’s words in your own words before you use a source)

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