GEN 300 Week 1 Presentation

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GEN/300 Week 1 Presentation : 

GEN/300 Week 1 Presentation Developed and maintained by Julia A. Westlake

Overview and Purpose : 

Overview and Purpose The weekly PowerPoint Presentations will provide you with: Summarized Information from the course readings Helpful information for completing the week’s assignments Tips and tricks for helping you to be successful Remember to read each week’s presentation so that you have the tools necessary to succeed. Refer to the texts and other course materials should you require any additional detail or clarification.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 Why lifelong learning is important: Knowledge in nearly every field is doubling every two to three years. Technology is changing how you live and work. Our economy is moving from a product and service base to and knowledge and talent base. Personal choices are becoming more complex. Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 Develop and maintain flexibility Embrace change, responding to it with anticipation rather than fear. Become self-directed. See yourself as part of a bigger picture. The culture is changing rapidly, especially as society becomes more diverse. Social interactions are changing as a part of the internet Business is changing due to the internet and the growing global marketplace. Accept that you will probably change jobs, and even careers, several times in your life. Accept that economic shifts may force you to move from one job to another Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 View organizations as learning centers Corporations and companies Not-for-profit organizations Federal agencies All see the need for continued learning, as an employee you will be expected to grow and continue to change with the needs of the company and the client-base. If you are an entrepreneur you will experience even more of a push to continually change and adapt to your client’s needs. Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 Becoming a strategic learner What are my short-term goals? What are my long-term goals? Will my success depend on continued learning? What financial success can I reasonably expect? Will I be satisfied with my work? Ask yourself these questions in terms of your job that you have right now, the job you want in the near future, and your overall career. Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 The will and self-awareness to learn Value effective study skills and strategies Have self-esteem and confidence to believe that you can learn effective study skills Analyze your personal learning style in order to maximize your strengths and develop your weaknesses Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 The skill to accomplish study goals Develop effective study and learning strategies Recognize that critical thinking is the foundation for effective studying Welcome the input of others Use technology to aid your studying Know how to prepare effectively for assignments and exams Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 The self-regulation to monitor and manage the personal learning process Define specific short and long-term goals Evaluate how well you do in achieving your study goals Examine the various obstacles to learning Make a plan for overcoming each identified obstacle Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 Getting ready to study! Get motivated Spend time reflecting on why your goal is meaningful to you Make a decision to take a step towards your goal Examine and address your obstacles Begin or begin again – keep moving forward Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 Make a commitment State your commitment concretely – write it down! Get started and take notes on your progress. Review your commitment regularly. Keep track of your commitment – remind yourself.

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 Be responsible Build self-esteem Think positively Stop negative self talk and change your thoughts to positive comments Walk away from others or change the subject when they start speaking negatively Replace words of obligation-which rob you of power- with words of personal intent Not your success

Chapter 1 : 

Chapter 1 Take action! Make action plans Build your own code of discipline Acknowledge every step Build teamwork skills Realize everyone on the team has their own challenges, support them but do not make excuses Set and achieve goals as a team Realize as a team you succeed or as a team you fail Do not bring the team problems without solutions or at least ideas for solutions. Embrace change Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 2 : 

Chapter 2 There is no one “right way” or best way to learn. There are personal styles of learning and personal learning strengths. And there are benefits to knowing your learning style in terms of study habits and the classroom (online or face-to-face). Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 2 : 

Chapter 2 Study benefits Maximize your strengths Minimize frustration Use valid techniques for improving weaknesses Classroom benefits Can help you make the best of the teacher’s instructional practices Address ways you can make the instructor’s teaching practices work for you You will be better prepared to ask the instructor for help Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 2 : 

Chapter 2 Multiple intelligences theory Verbal-linguistic Ability to communicate through language – written, reading, speaking, listening. Logical-mathematical Ability to understand logical reasoning and problem-solving (math, science, patterns, sequences) Bodily-kinesthetic Ability to use the physical body skillfully and take in knowledge through bodily sensations (coordination, working with the hands) Visual-spatial Ability to understand spatial relations and to perceive and create images (visual art, graphic design, charts, and maps) Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 2 : 

Chapter 2 Multiple intelligences theory Interpersonal Ability to relate to others, noticing their moods, motivations, and feelings (social activity, cooperative learning, teamwork) Intrapersonal Ability to understand one’s own behavior and feelings (self-awareness, independence, time spent alone) Musical Ability to comprehend and create meaningful sound (music, sensitivity to sound, understanding patterns) Naturalistic Ability to understand features of the environment (interest in nature, environmental balance, ecosystems, stress relief brought by natural environments) Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 2 : 

Chapter 2 Personality spectrum Modeled from the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Helps you to better understand yourself and those around you Helps you to identify your strengths and weaknesses and to develop and refine your skills Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 2 : 

Chapter 2 Use the assessments for Reference Understanding Avoid overreacting to challenges Remember that just because something seems difficult at first does not mean that it is difficult In actuality most tasks/processes/etc. are very simple once broken apart Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Chapter 2 : 

Chapter 2 How will knowing your learning style help your career? You will perform more successfully You will be able to better function in teams You will be able to target areas that need improvement Adapted from: Carter, C., Bishop, J., & Kravits, S. (2007). Keys to college studying: Becoming an active thinker (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Grammar Review : 

Grammar Review Rules for colon ( : ) usage To elaborate or explain Directions: Stir in one part x and two parts y. With lists To be successful students should follow three rules: (1) read the syllabus, (2) print the syllabus, and (3) follow the syllabus. Students should: Read the syllabus Print the syllabus Follow the syllabus. Do not use with lists which are introduced by an incomplete sentence.

Grammar Review : 

Grammar Review Rules for colon ( : ) usage After a complete or incomplete statement that introduces a horizontal or vertical list that includes the words “the following”, “as follows”, “these”, or “thus” Students will use the following tools: OLS, the syllabus, and the course calendar. With quotations Jane Doe said: “The student who reads and follows the syllabus exactly will succeed.” Use a colon in these specific instances: Between hours and minutes in time, 11:00 To substitute the word to in a ratio, 4:1 After business letter salutations, Dear Mr. Adams: In Biblical citations, Genesis 1:1

Grammar Review : 

Grammar Review Rules for semicolon ( ; ) usage To show a close relationship between two complete sentences when a period would be too much of an interruption Class weeks begin on Tuesdays; materials are posted in the classroom on Mondays. As an alternative to a comma and a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so) use a semicolon to separate two complete statements. Always use a semicolon if one of the statements has a comma in it. Julia posted the course materials; the students read the materials in the course materials forum. University of Phoenix, our university, has over 500,000 students; but more than 60% of the students attend online as opposed to the other 140 plus campus locations.

Grammar Review : 

Grammar Review Rules for semicolon ( ; ) usage To separate two complete statements that contrast or show cause and effect (alternative is to create two create 2 separate sentences) Mary did not meet all of her long-term goals; she did not meet many of her short-term goals. Between complete statements separated by transitional words or phrases such as however, in other words, therefore, or nevertheless. Use a comma after the transitional phrase or word. Students in GEN/300 are often first time students to the University of Phoenix; however, many of the students have previously attended Axia College, the university’s junior college.

Grammar Review : 

Grammar Review Rules for semicolon ( ; ) usage If items in a series contain internal commas, use a semicolon to separate the items. The cook requested several specific items: five eggs, large; oregano, Italian; and celery, chopped.

Academic Writing Review : 

Academic Writing Review APA rules for capitalization Words at the beginning of a sentence Major words in titles and headings of a paper Proper nouns and trade names Nouns followed by numerals or letters Titles of specific tests Names of factors, variables, and effects

Academic Writing Review : 

Academic Writing Review Prepositions A preposition is a word that links phrases, nouns, and pronouns to other words in a sentence (Ottawa, 2007). Link to information and list of prepositions: http://www.arts.uottawa.ca/writcent/hypergrammar/preposit.html Because the preposition’s function is to link in the sentence, it cannot come at the end of a sentence.

Academic Writing Review : 

Academic Writing Review First person I, me, my, we, our, mine, personally Second person You, your, yourself, our Third person People, the students, one Academic papers should NEVER be written in first or second person unless the prompt specifically says write in first person or second person narrative.

Academic Writing Review : 

Academic Writing Review APA papers Are double spaced All paragraphs should be indented 5 spaces or one tab space All paragraphs should be aligned left Numbers under 9 are written out (one, two, three), over 9 appear as digits (9, 10, 11) For every reference there must be an in-text citation for material used from that reference

Academic Writing Review : 

Academic Writing Review All papers must use at least two levels of APA headers Level 1 headers are used for major sections like the introduction and conclusion Level 2 headers are used to introduce sections of the paper Level One Headers are Centered Level Two Headers are Aligned Left and in Italics

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