When to Inform Your Team of Major Developments in Your Business

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Anyone in a leadership position faces the same basic conundrum when it comes to communicating key developments with your team. The questions of how, when, and why can all become a little bit overwhelming when you consider the impact that it will have not just on employee morale but on the business at large.

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When to Inform Your Team of Major Developments in Your Business Anyone in a leadership position faces the same basic conundrum when it comes to communicating key developments with your team. The questions of how when and why can all become a little bit overwhelming when you consider the impact that it will have not just on employee morale but on the business at large. Thats why its important to operate within a few key parameters when disseminating information to your employees. Here are a few key tactics that have been used by professionals across various industries and will work for you too. 1. Squash Rumors Before They Start: Rampant speculation about business developments such as mergers acquisitions strategy shifts and more can be sniffed out by even the most amateur of reporters. An unqualified source here and a mildly-disgruntled employee there and before you know it the rumor mill is in full swing leaving your company completely off-kilter. While you cant address every single rumor that goes throughout the corporate blogosphere you can deliver nuggets of information that will hold people over until the real news can drop. Moreover reassure your team that as soon as new developments become available you will communicate those to your team as well. 2. When In Doubt Rely On the Facts: People love to pontificate about all the "what-if" scenarios involving businesses but dont allow yourself or your team to be carried about by theories or possibilities. Instead address them in terms of fact-based conversations: "We dont know that for sure but we do know that X and Y

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have taken place." Never disclose information that isnt already public knowledge unless you feel like its the right time to do so but pointing and redirecting people back to the facts can help keep everyone on the same page. 3. Resist the Urge to Constantly Provide Updates: Heres a tip: as soon as you learn a piece of information yourself sit on it for at least a day before you entertain the idea of sharing it with team members. Even then its best to ask your inner circle for their advice before it becomes common knowledge. Updating people in real-time on the developments in your business has the impression of transparency but what it really looks like to most people is utter chaos. Things happen behind the scenes all the time that either never make it to the forefront or take longer than expected to develop so resist the urge to tell people everything as it happens. Theyll be none the wiser for it and the important issues will still develop. 4. Encourage Your Team to Ask Questions: The last thing you want your team to believe is that theyre irrelevant in the larger structure of your organization. They dont want to be blindsided by major developments that affect them but they also dont need to be kept abreast of every development. Remind them that your business is always in a state of "growth" and that change comes with the territory. With that in mind encourage them to come to you with any questions or concerns whether in an informal or a formal capacity. Tell them what you can and if you cant simply explain to them why not and when they should be able to expect it. Your team will at the very least respect your honesty. Jay Sekulow is the Chief Counsel for the American Center for Law Justice.

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