ChineseAmericans

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Chinese Americans : 

Chinese Americans Chinese emigrating to the United States in 1860-1910 only made up 1% of the newly arriving population. Many of the Chinese who first arrived traveled from Guangdong Province in China. They initially settled along the Pacific coast (near San Francisco)

Why did many Chinese decide to leave their homeland?: 

Why did many Chinese decide to leave their homeland? Sought sanctuary from intense conflicts caused by the British Opium Wars. Peasant Rebellions: The Qing government had imposed high taxes on the peasant farmers because China was forced to pay fees to the western imperialist powers. Many farmers lost their land and searched for golden opportunities abroad. For example in 1860 a Chinese laborer might earn only 3-5 dollars a month but if they worked for the United States railroad they could earn up to 30 dollars. The Chinese immigrants who arrived in the United States were mostly men, planning to work away from home temporarily.

Slide3: 

Chinese Opium smokers in the United States

Chinese Westward Expansion: 

Chinese Westward Expansion The Central Pacific railroad work force consisted of mostly Chinese workers.

Slide5: 

A Chinese immigrant mining for gold in California.

Anti Chinese Movement and Exclusion: 

Anti Chinese Movement and Exclusion Who is standing there reading the information posted on the wall? What three groups are represented in the political cartoon? What is the message of this illustration?

Slide7: 

Why is the man holding on to the tree? What is trying to bring him down? What does the man want to Veto?

Slide8: 

Describe what the political cartoon tells you about the topic.

Slide9: 

Observe what is happening in this drawing. Write four descriptive words that come to mind as you examine the political drawing from 1882.

Slide10: 

What other groups in American history have also been excluded? What kind of treatment did they receive?

Slide11: 

A French political cartoon showing how China is being divided by the United Kingdom, Germany, Russia, France, and Japan.

What was the Chinese Exclusion Act? In 1882 the United States Congress pass an act denying citizenship to people born in China and prohibited the immigration of Chinese Laborers. Chinese who entered America before passing the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act were among those who left to return to their homelands. The Chinese population in the United States dropped more than 10,00 in 1890 to less than 65,000 in 1920. Who were the immigrants arriving prior to 1880? Who do you think was in favor of having this act passed? What did they have to gain? : 

What was the Chinese Exclusion Act? In 1882 the United States Congress pass an act denying citizenship to people born in China and prohibited the immigration of Chinese Laborers. Chinese who entered America before passing the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act were among those who left to return to their homelands. The Chinese population in the United States dropped more than 10,00 in 1890 to less than 65,000 in 1920. Who were the immigrants arriving prior to 1880? Who do you think was in favor of having this act passed? What did they have to gain?

Angel Island: 

Angel Island Between 1910 – 1940 approximately 175,000 Chinese immigrants came to America through Angel Island.

A New Life What do you notice about the architecture of the picture? : 

A New Life What do you notice about the architecture of the picture?

Slide16: 

What are some results from the two cultures meeting?

Slide18: 

By the year 1851, there were 25,000 Chinese working in California, more than half the Chinese in the U.S.. These Chinese clustered into groups, working hard and forming large cities of ethnic enclaves called "Chinatowns". The first and most important of the Chinatowns belonged to San Francisco.  

Slide19: 

Chinese New Year banner’s decorate the home in Weaverville, California.

Slide20: 

Chinese men wearing a traditional long braid called a queue.

Chinese School : 

Chinese School 1860    The California Legislature orders the establishment of segregated schools.  White children must be educated separately from blacks, Indians and Chinese.

Problems In China Town: 

Problems In China Town 1854    People vs. Hall.  California Supreme Court rules that "Chinese and other people not white" cannot testify against whites in court. 

Slide30: 

What were some of the challenges faced by many immigrants?

Bibliography Library of Congress Cradle [Chinese man mining along river]: From Views of the American West DIGITAL ID cubcic brk2970 Library of Congress pages 1-100: From Scrapbooks on Chinese immigration, 1877-1893.creator Davis, Horace, 1831-1916DIGITAL ID cubcic brk208 Library of Congress At Last the Democratic Tiger Has Something to Hang On: From Harper's Weekly: Harper's Weekly, Vol. 26creator Harper’s Magazine CO.,1857-1976DIGITAL ID cubcic brk7181 Library of Congress The Balky Team. Uncle Sam, "Say, Mr. Wasp, You'll Never Get That Wagon Out of the Mud Unless Your Team Pulls Together. Can't You See Those Rocks?"[spread]: From The Wasp: v. 2, Aug. 1877- July 1878 CREATOR Publisher: Wasp Publishing Company DIGITAL ID cubcic brk1783 Library of Congress "Capital Stocks": From The Wasp: v. 8, Jan. - June 1882 CREATOR Publisher: Wasp Publishing Company DIGITAL IDcubcic brk1510 Library of Congress The Chinese Question Again. [Scott's Exclusion Act] [back cover]: From The Wasp: v. 23, July - Dec. 1889 CREATOR Publisher: Wasp Publishing Company DIGITAL IDcubcic brk1712 Library of Congress Balcony of the Chinese Restaurant, Dupont Street, San Francisco: From Album of views of California and the West, Canada, and China CREATED/PUBLISHED ca. 1885-ca. 1895 DIGITAL ID cubcic brk3060 Library of Congress Bulletin of latest news, Chinatown: From Miscellaneous California views from the collection of Joseph A. Baird DIGITAL ID cubcic brk2984 Library of Congress "Chinatown Detail -- Mug Book -- 1910": From San Francisco Chinatown (ante-1910): SF Chinatown (ante-1910): Underworld DIGITAL ID cubcic chs282 Library of Congress "Chinese Baby Welfare, San Francisco, 1928": From San Francisco Chinatown (post-1910): SF Chinatown (post-1910): Children DIGITAL I D cubcic chs290 Library of Congress A Chinese girl of today. Mar. 1922.: From Jesse Brown Cook Scrapbooks Documenting San Francisco History and Law Enforcement DIGITAL ID cubcic brk7377 Library of Congress The Dead Walls of China Town at the N.W. cor. Washington & Dupont St. in 1900 - see the ques [sic] on the men. China Town - San Francisco: From Jesse Brown Cook Scrapbooks Documenting San Francisco History and Law Enforcement DIGITAL ID cubcic brk7379 Library of Congress [grandfather and infant]: From San Francisco Chinatown (post-1910): SF Chinatown (post-1910): Silberstein (Mervyn) photos DIGITAL ID cubcic chs785 Library of Congress Grant Ave, SF -- ca. 1910": From San Francisco Street Photgraphs: Grant -- California to Sacramento (600 block) DIGITAL ID cubcic chs452 Library of Congress [Unidentified children on bicycle.]: From San Francisco Chinese Community and Earthquake Damage DIGITAL I cubcic brk7402 Library of Congress Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Yong Young.: From San Francisco Chinese Community and Earthquake Damage CREATED/PUBLISHED ca. 1906 DIGITAL I cubcic brk7450 : 

Bibliography Library of Congress Cradle [Chinese man mining along river]: From Views of the American West DIGITAL ID cubcic brk2970 Library of Congress pages 1-100: From Scrapbooks on Chinese immigration, 1877-1893.creator Davis, Horace, 1831-1916DIGITAL ID cubcic brk208 Library of Congress At Last the Democratic Tiger Has Something to Hang On: From Harper's Weekly: Harper's Weekly, Vol. 26creator Harper’s Magazine CO.,1857-1976DIGITAL ID cubcic brk7181 Library of Congress The Balky Team. Uncle Sam, "Say, Mr. Wasp, You'll Never Get That Wagon Out of the Mud Unless Your Team Pulls Together. Can't You See Those Rocks?"[spread]: From The Wasp: v. 2, Aug. 1877- July 1878 CREATOR Publisher: Wasp Publishing Company DIGITAL ID cubcic brk1783 Library of Congress "Capital Stocks": From The Wasp: v. 8, Jan. - June 1882 CREATOR Publisher: Wasp Publishing Company DIGITAL IDcubcic brk1510 Library of Congress The Chinese Question Again. [Scott's Exclusion Act] [back cover]: From The Wasp: v. 23, July - Dec. 1889 CREATOR Publisher: Wasp Publishing Company DIGITAL IDcubcic brk1712 Library of Congress Balcony of the Chinese Restaurant, Dupont Street, San Francisco: From Album of views of California and the West, Canada, and China CREATED/PUBLISHED ca. 1885-ca. 1895 DIGITAL ID cubcic brk3060 Library of Congress Bulletin of latest news, Chinatown: From Miscellaneous California views from the collection of Joseph A. Baird DIGITAL ID cubcic brk2984 Library of Congress "Chinatown Detail -- Mug Book -- 1910": From San Francisco Chinatown (ante-1910): SF Chinatown (ante-1910): Underworld DIGITAL ID cubcic chs282 Library of Congress "Chinese Baby Welfare, San Francisco, 1928": From San Francisco Chinatown (post-1910): SF Chinatown (post-1910): Children DIGITAL I D cubcic chs290 Library of Congress A Chinese girl of today. Mar. 1922.: From Jesse Brown Cook Scrapbooks Documenting San Francisco History and Law Enforcement DIGITAL ID cubcic brk7377 Library of Congress The Dead Walls of China Town at the N.W. cor. Washington & Dupont St. in 1900 - see the ques [sic] on the men. China Town - San Francisco: From Jesse Brown Cook Scrapbooks Documenting San Francisco History and Law Enforcement DIGITAL ID cubcic brk7379 Library of Congress [grandfather and infant]: From San Francisco Chinatown (post-1910): SF Chinatown (post-1910): Silberstein (Mervyn) photos DIGITAL ID cubcic chs785 Library of Congress Grant Ave, SF -- ca. 1910": From San Francisco Street Photgraphs: Grant -- California to Sacramento (600 block) DIGITAL ID cubcic chs452 Library of Congress [Unidentified children on bicycle.]: From San Francisco Chinese Community and Earthquake Damage DIGITAL I cubcic brk7402 Library of Congress Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Yong Young.: From San Francisco Chinese Community and Earthquake Damage CREATED/PUBLISHED ca. 1906 DIGITAL I cubcic brk7450

Slide33: 

Library of Congress 7360 Chinese Public School Children, San Francisco, Cal. Taber Photo, San Francisco, Cal.: From Roy D. Graves pictorial collection: Chinese and Chinatown DIGITAL ID cubcic brk1331 Library of Congress A Barter.: From Roy D. Graves pictorial collection: Chinese and Chinatown DIGITAL ID cubcic brk1274 Library of Congress Chan Kwan On: certificate to enter U.S.: From Immigration documents miscellany DIGITAL I D cubcic brk3853 Library of Congress Chinese butcher and Grocery Shop. Chinatown, S. F. Taber Photo, San Francisco: From Roy D. Graves pictorial collection: Chinese and Chinatown DIGITALI cubcic brk 1245 Library of Congress "Chinese Family, Monterey, California": From General Subjects Social Groups: Chinese (large photographs)DIGITAL ID cubcic chs410 Library of Congress Golden Gate Park. 1890s: From Roy D. Graves pictorial collection: Chinese and Chinatown DIGITAL ID cubcic brk1272 Library of Congress Hsu Ping Chen and family: From Photographs from the Hart Hyatt North papers: [Portraits, Primarily Chinese, Folder 1] DIGITAL ID cubcic brk1203 Library of Congress To Hon. H. H. North, with best wishes from Yong, April 18, 1920: From Photographs from the Hart Hyatt North papers: [Portraits, Primarily Chinese, Folder 2]DIGITAL ID cubcic brk1209 Library of Congress U.S. Immigration Station, Angel Island, San Francisco Bay. Approach from wharf to main building.: From Library Photographs from the Hart Hyatt North papers: Angel Island DIGITAL ID cubcic brk1188 Library of Congress Underground Opium Den: From Roy D. Graves pictorial collection: Chinese and Chinatown Digital ID cubric brk 1315 Map of Guangdong: http://www.fanyu.com/_derived/Guangdong_china.htm_txt_china.gif Political cartoon: http://www.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/thumb/0/0e/200px-China_imperialism_cartoon.jpg

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