Microsoft Word 2003

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Learn little bit about Word 2003

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Microsoft® Office Word 2003 Training: 

Microsoft® Office Word 2003 Training Decorate documents with graphic and text effects [Your company name] presents:

Course contents: 

Course contents Overview: Bringing your document to life Lesson 1: Adding a watermark or background picture Lesson 2: Adding a border, shading, or fill effect Lesson 3: Creating special text effects Each lesson includes a list of suggested tasks and a set of test questions.

Overview: Bringing your document to life: 

Your document is complete, but something’s missing, and you don’t have a lot of time to hand-craft graphical pizzazz. Overview: Bringing your document to life Word has a large, built-in store of attractive backgrounds, borders, shading, and graphical text effects that you can apply quickly to the page or to text for instant effect. This course shows you how.

Course goals: 

Course goals Add a watermark or background. Create borders and shading effects on text, tables, and entire pages. Animate text and create other graphical text effects.

Lesson 1: 

Lesson 1 Adding a watermark or background picture

Adding a watermark or background picture: 

Adding a watermark or background picture Watermarks and backgrounds are somewhat similar—they can both be used to add visual interest in the document background without overpowering text. However, their form and function veer off from there. Watermark Background

Adding a watermark or background picture: 

Adding a watermark or background picture The picture illustrates the most significant difference between the two types of images: Watermark Background Watermarks are intended to appear in printed documents, behind the text. Backgrounds are used in Web pages.

Add a watermark to a printed document: 

Add a watermark to a printed document You can add two types of watermark to a document: a picture or text. You insert both from the Printed Watermark dialog box (on the Format menu, Background submenu). The watermark is visible behind text but doesn’t obscure it.

Add a watermark to a printed document: 

Add a watermark to a printed document For pictures, you can choose from any image on your hard disk or from clip art in the Microsoft Clip Organizer. The watermark is visible behind text but doesn’t obscure it. For text, you can select the text you want from the drop-down list or type your own text, and select font, size, and color the same way you do for regular document text.

Add a watermark to a printed document: 

Add a watermark to a printed document Once it’s inserted, you can see your watermark in print layout view (click Print Layout on the View menu), or in the printed document. The watermark is visible behind text but doesn’t obscure it.

Add a background to a Web page: 

Add a background to a Web page Web page backgrounds can take a number of forms: Decorative background on a Web page Solid color Texture, such as different color marble or woodgrain effects A pattern, such as stripes or checkerboards A picture from your hard disk

Add a background to a Web page: 

Add a background to a Web page To choose and add a background, use the Fill Effects dialog box (also on the Format menu, Background submenu). Decorative background on a Web page

Suggestions for practice: 

Suggestions for practice Add a watermark. Add a background. Online practice (requires Word 2003)

Test 1, question 1: 

Test 1, question 1 What is the main purpose of a watermark? (Pick one answer.) Authenticate your document as the original. Add a dappled, water-like finish to your printed document. Communicate useful information or add visual interest without overpowering the main text of the document.

Test 1, question 1: Answer: 

Test 1, question 1: Answer You can add text watermarks such as “Confidential,” “Draft,” or any designator you choose. You can also add graphical watermarks. Both sit behind your text so that they don’t obscure it.

Test 1, question 2: 

Test 1, question 2 What is the main difference between backgrounds and watermarks? (Pick one answer.) Backgrounds are always solid colors, and watermarks are always transparent images. Backgrounds are intended for documents that will be viewed on the Web, and watermarks for printed documents or documents that will be displayed in print layout view. There is no difference. The two serve the same function.

Test 1, question 2: Answer: 

Test 1, question 2: Answer Word helps you with this. For example, when you add a background fill effect, Word automatically switches to Web layout view if you’re not already there. And you cannot add a printed watermark if you’re in Web layout view; Word makes the Printed Watermark command unavailable.

Lesson 2: 

Lesson 2 Adding a border, shading, or fill effect

Adding a border, shading, or fill effect: 

Adding a border, shading, or fill effect Borders, shading, and decorative fill effects aren’t just for holiday newsletters. Word offers a range of options for framing and emphasizing text, tables and table cells, graphics, and entire pages. This lesson introduces these ready-made and customizable options and shows you the basics of how to add them to your document. Decorative page border and a graphic with a gradient fill

Page borders: 

Page borders You can add full or partial borders to any portion of any page of a document. Word provides a variety of built-in page borders, from businesslike to fancy. You start from the Page Border tab in the Borders and Shading dialog box (Format menu). Document with a graphical page border

Page borders: 

Page borders From the Page Border tab, you can choose: Document with a graphical page border The type of overall border, from a simple box to shadowed to 3-D to a custom style of your design. The line style, color, and thickness. The artistic style, which can be fun if your document is informal or tied to a special occasion, event, or holiday.

Page borders: 

Page borders Document with a graphical page border You can preview the design right inside the dialog box, so it’s easy to see how your chosen effects will look.

Borders for text, tables, and graphics: 

Borders for text, tables, and graphics You can put borders around discrete chunks of text to set them apart. You can also use borders to set off tables and graphics, as shown in the picture. To add a border, you select the text, table, table cell, or graphic. Then open the Borders and Shading dialog box, click the Borders tab, and choose the style, width, color, and so on. Borders and shading applied to text, the page, tables, and graphics

Borders for text, tables, and graphics: 

Borders for text, tables, and graphics Note that if you’re working with AutoShapes (a particular type of Word graphic that you insert by using the AutoShapes command), the method for adding a border is different. Borders and shading applied to text, the page, tables, and graphics After selecting the shape, you use the Line Color and Line Style buttons on the Drawing toolbar.

Shading: 

Shading You can add shading to text, tables, or pages by using the Shading tab in the Borders and Shading dialog box. As with borders, you can experiment with colors and styles, and preview the effects. Shading emphasizes the heading and pull quote.

Shading: 

Shading Here, that preview is particularly helpful because the color and gradient you choose for the shading can make the words on the page hard to read. Shading emphasizes the heading and pull quote. You always want to make sure that the effect you choose doesn’t overpower the text itself.

Shading: 

Shading As with borders, the shading for AutoShapes works differently than it does for text and tables. Select the shape, and then use the Fill Color button on the Drawing toolbar. Shading emphasizes the heading and pull quote.

Quick table effects: 

Quick table effects If you specifically want to set apart or spruce up a table, take a look at the Table AutoFormat feature. It provides built-in border, shading, and color schemes. The schemes are great because the designs are unified and professional, and they save you the hassle of manually applying separate effects. Table with a Table AutoFormat scheme

Quick table effects: 

Quick table effects To apply a Table AutoFormat scheme, first select the table you want. Then click through and make your choices in the Table AutoFormat dialog box (Table menu). Table with a Table AutoFormat scheme The preview shows exactly what your choice will look like. If you feel creative, or if you find a style that you like but want to change a piece of it, you can modify it.

Quick table effects: 

Quick table effects You can also use Table AutoFormat as you’re creating a new table: In the Insert Table dialog box (Table menu, Insert command), click AutoFormat. Table with a Table AutoFormat scheme

Graphic fill effects: 

Graphic fill effects You can color drawing objects—AutoShapes, text boxes, WordArt, and objects on the drawing canvas—with fill effects such as gradients. If you have one of these types of objects in your document and want to add a fill, first select it. The AutoShape smiley face has a gradient fill.

Graphic fill effects: 

Graphic fill effects Then on the Drawing toolbar, click the arrow next to the Fill Color button to open the Fill Effects dialog box. The AutoShape smiley face has a gradient fill. Use the tabs to add patterns, gradients, textures, and other effects.

Suggestions for practice: 

Suggestions for practice Add a page border. Shade a heading. Format a table. Add a gradient fill to a shape. Online practice (requires Word 2003)

Test 2, question 1: 

Test 2, question 1 To add borders or shading to text or to a whole page, you start from which central place? (Pick one answer.) The Borders and Shading dialog box. The Font dialog box. The Drawing toolbar.

Test 2, question 1: Answer: 

Test 2, question 1: Answer To access this dialog box, which has separate tabs for each type of effect, you click Borders and Shading on the Format menu.

Test 2, question 2: 

Test 2, question 2 What’s the quickest way to add visual formatting to a table? (Pick one answer.) Add borders to individual rows and columns, and then apply shading in the same sequence. Apply a Table AutoFormat scheme.

Test 2, question 2: Answer: 

Test 2, question 2: Answer Word offers an array of built-in coordinated table schemes with borders, shading, colors, and other formatting that you can apply all at once instead of in separate steps.

Lesson 3: 

Lesson 3 Creating special text effects

Creating special text effects: 

Creating special text effects How do you emphasize text? Often it’s the old standbys, bold and italic, or maybe the occasional application of all caps. But Word offers a range of graphical formatting gems—such as embossing, drop caps, WordArt, and animations—that can add strong visual impact when used sparingly. Drop cap, embossed text, WordArt, and text animation

Special font effects: 

Special font effects You can add a great deal of impact to text just by changing the font effect. Start by opening the Font dialog box (Format menu). Under Effects, in the center section, you’ll see four effects. Shadow, outline, emboss, and engrave font effects

Special font effects: 

Special font effects Shadow, outline, emboss, and engrave font effects Shadow darkens text and adds a slight shadow behind it. Outline removes the solid fill of the text, leaving just an outline. Emboss makes the text look like it’s raised off the page in relief. Engrave makes the text appear pressed into the page.

Special font effects: 

Special font effects Some usage tips Shadow, outline, emboss, and engrave font effects These effects often show up best when you use a larger font size. In many cases, the effects look great when used in combination with other more basic effects, such as different fonts and font styles (for example, bold and italic).

Special font effects: 

Special font effects Some usage tips Shadow, outline, emboss, and engrave font effects Like anything fancy, these effects tend to work best when used sparingly, for example when limited to headings or emphasis text.

Create a drop cap: 

Create a drop cap Think of an ancient illuminated text, or the start of a fairy tale. That “O” in “Once upon a time.” In modern typography, that’s referred to as a drop cap. It’s easy to create a drop cap in Word to convey elegance at the start of your document. The drop cap elegantly emphasizes the first letter on the page.

Create a drop cap: 

Create a drop cap Select the letter you want to turn into a drop cap, and then click Drop Cap on the Format menu. The drop cap elegantly emphasizes the first letter on the page. The letter you selected appears in a text box, where you can select it and make changes if you want, just the way you would with regular text.

Add WordArt: 

Add WordArt WordArt gives your words a graphic edge, turning any text into a shadowed, skewed, rotated, or stretched version of itself. To add WordArt, you use the WordArt Gallery, which you get to from the Insert menu, Picture command, or by clicking the Insert WordArt button on the Drawing toolbar. WordArt provides quick effects such as shading and 3-D.

Add WordArt: 

Add WordArt Once you insert WordArt, you can use the WordArt toolbar to change it. WordArt provides quick effects such as shading and 3-D. The toolbar appears as soon as you insert and then select the WordArt, and lets you change things like the curve of the text, the background color, the space between letters, and so on.

Animate text: 

Animate text If you’re working on a Web page or a Word document that will be viewed online, you can animate text. It’s a matter of adding a simple font effect. Just select the text that you want to animate—for example, a heading—and then open the Font dialog box (Format menu). On the Text Effects tab, choose from the selection of animation effects. The Sparkle Text animation effect

Animate text: 

Animate text As with any high-impact effect, it’s best to use text animation sparingly, limiting your application to individual words and short phrases. The Sparkle Text animation effect Otherwise, you risk diluting the impact, causing visual clutter, and in extreme cases, rendering text unreadable.

Suggestions for practice: 

Suggestions for practice Add a high-impact font effect. Animate text. Insert WordArt. Online practice (requires Word 2003)

Test 3, question 1: 

Test 3, question 1 Which of the following “best practice” guidelines applies to the use of special text effects? (Pick one answer.) Be sparing. Variety makes the biggest impact. Consistency is key; for example, if one heading is animated, they all should be.

Test 3, question 1: Answer: 

Test 3, question 1: Answer Special text effects have the most impact when you limit them.

Test 3, question 2: 

Test 3, question 2 How would you change WordArt that you just inserted? (Pick one answer.) Use the Drawing toolbar. Choose options on the AutoShapes menu. Use the WordArt toolbar.

Test 3, question 2: Answer: 

Test 3, question 2: Answer This toolbar appears as soon as you insert and select the WordArt, and you can use it to change many aspects of the WordArt’s appearance.

Quick Reference Card: 

Quick Reference Card For a summary of the tasks covered in this course, view the Quick Reference Card.

USING THIS TEMPLATE: 

USING THIS TEMPLATE See the notes pane or view the full notes page (View menu) for detailed help on this template.