Heart Failure

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By: syrasen (109 month(s) ago)

Whenever our heart doesn't work properly then we started to think that we haven't as much energy as before, that we get tired very soon and out of breath more quickly. This is because the tissues aren’t getting enough oxygen and is due to excess fluid in the tissues..We may feel short of breath when they lie down because of fluid congesting the lungs. Shortness of breath when you exert yourself or when you lie down, Rapid or irregular heartbeat,Reduced ability to exercise,Sudden weight gain from fluid retention. Lack of appetite and nausea, chest pain are some of the symptoms of heart disease. http://www.insideheart.com/

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Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation Heart Failure

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? The heart is not pumping as well as it should Usually, the heart has been weakened by an underlying condition Blocked arteries Heart attack High blood pressure Infections Heart valve abnormalities Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? Heart failure can involve the left or right side of the heart or both Usually the left side is affected first Heart failure occurs when either side of the heart cannot keep up with the flow of blood Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What is Left Heart Failure? Involves the left ventricle (lower chamber) of the heart Systolic failure The heart looses it’s ability to contract or pump blood into the circulation Diastolic failure The heart looses it’s ability to relax because it becomes stiff Heart cannot fill properly between each beat Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What is Left Heart Failure? Systolic and diastolic heart failure are treated with different types of medications In both types, blood may “back up” in the lungs causing fluid to leak into the lungs (pulmonary edema) Fluid may also build up in tissues throughout the body (edema) Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What is Right Heart Failure? Usually occurs as a result of left heart failure The right ventricle pumps blood to the lungs for oxygen Occasionally isolated right heart failure can occur due to lung disease or blood clots to the lung (pulmonary embolism) Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure How fast does heart failure develop? Usually a chronic disease The heart tries to compensate for the loss in pumping function by: Developing more muscle mass Enlarging Pumping faster Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What Causes Heart Failure? Health conditions that either damage the heart or make it work too hard Coronary artery disease Heart attack High blood pressure Abnormal heart valves Heart muscle diseases (cardiomyopathy) Heart inflammation (myocarditis) Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What Causes Heart Failure? Congenital heart defects Severe lung disease Diabetes Severe anemia Overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) Abnormal heart rhythms Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What Causes Heart Failure? Coronary artery disease Cholesterol and fatty deposits build up in the heart’s arteries Less blood and oxygen reach the heart muscle This causes the heart to work harder and occasionally damages the heart muscle Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What Causes Heart Failure? Heart attack An artery supplying blood to the heart becomes blocked Loss of oxygen and nutrients damages heart muscle tissue causing it to die Remaining healthy heart muscle must pump harder to keep up Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What Causes Heart Failure? High blood pressure Uncontrolled high blood pressure doubles a persons risk of developing heart failure Heart must pump harder to keep blood circulating Over time, chamber first thickens, then gets larger and weaker Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What Causes Heart Failure? Abnormal heart valves Heart muscle disease Damage to heart muscle due to drugs, alcohol or infections Congenital heart disease Severe lung disease Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What Causes Heart Failure? Diabetes Tend to have other conditions that make the heart work harder Obesity Hypertension High cholesterol Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure What Causes Heart Failure? Severe anemia Not enough red blood cells to carry oxygen Heart beats faster and can become overtaxed with the effort Hyperthyroidism Body metabolism is increased and overworks the heart Abnormal Heart Rhythm If the heart beats too fast, too slow or irregular it may not be able to pump enough blood to the body Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure Shortness of Breath (dyspnea) WHY? Blood “backs up” in the pulmonary veins because the heart can’t keep up with the supply an fluid leaks into the lungs SYMPTOMS Dyspnea on exertion or at rest Difficulty breathing when lying flat Waking up short of breath Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure Persistent Cough or Wheezing WHY? Fluid “backs up” in the lungs SYMPTOMS Coughing that produces white or pink blood-tinged sputum Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure Edema WHY? Decreased blood flow out of the weak heart Blood returning to the heart from the veins “backs up” causing fluid to build up in tissues SYMPTOMS Swelling in feet, ankles, legs or abdomen Weight gain Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure Tiredness, fatigue WHY? Heart can’t pump enough blood to meet needs of bodies tissues Body diverts blood away from less vital organs (muscles in limbs) and sends it to the heart and brain SYMPTOMS Constant tired feeling Difficulty with everyday activities Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure Lack of appetite/ Nausea WHY? The digestive system receives less blood causing problems with digestion SYMPTOMS Feeling of being full or sick to your stomach Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure Confusion/ Impaired thinking WHY? Changing levels of substances in the blood ( sodium) can cause confusion SYMPTOMS Memory loss or feeling of disorientation Relative or caregiver may notice this first Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure Increased heart rate WHY? The heart beats faster to “make up for” the loss in pumping function SYMPTOMS Heart palpitations May feel like the heart is racing or throbbing Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

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Heart Failure Treatment Options The more common forms of heart failure cannot be cured, but can be treated Lifestyle changes Medications Surgery Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Lifestyle changes Stop smoking Loose weight Avoid alcohol Avoid or limit caffeine Eat a low-fat, low-sodium diet Exercise Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Lifestyle changes Reduce stress Keep track of symptoms and weight and report any changes or concern to the doctor Limit fluid intake See the doctor more frequently Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

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Heart Failure Medications used to treat Heart Failure ACE Inhibitors Cornerstone of heart failure therapy Proven to slow the progression of heart failure Vasodilator – cause blood vessels to expand lowering blood pressure and the hearts work load Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Medications used to treat Heart Failure Diuretics (water pills) Prescribed for fluid build up, swelling or edema Cause kidneys to remove more sodium and water from the bloodstream Decreases workload of the heart and edema Fine balance – removing too much fluid can strain kidneys or cause low blood pressure Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Medications used to treat Heart Failure Potassium Most diuretics remove potassium from the body Potassium pills compensate for the amount lost in the urine Potassium helps control heart rhythm and is essential for the normal work of the nervous system and muscles Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Medications used to treat Heart Failure Vasodilators Cause blood vessel walls to relax Occasionally used if patient cannot tolerate ACE Decrease workload of the heart Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Medications used to treat Heart Failure Digitalis preparations Increases the force of the hearts contractions Relieves symptoms Slows heart rate and certain irregular heart beats Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Medications used to treat Heart Failure Beta-blockers Lower the heart rate and blood pressure Decrease the workload of the heart Blood-thinners (coumadin) Used in patients at risk for developing blood clots in the blood vessels, legs, lung and heart Used in irregular heart rhythms due to risk of stroke Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

Heart Failure : 

Heart Failure Treatment options Surgery and other Medical Procedures Not often used in heart failure unless there is a correctable problem Coronary artery bypass Angioplasty Valve replacement Defibrillator implantation Heart transplantation Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) Lifestyles, Fitness and Rehabilitation

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