CH 26 - Fear on the West coast slideshow

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Fear on the West Coast Watch this slideshow, investigate the link to the website for Manzanar, and follow the link to watch George Takei’s story on You Tube, then participate in the discussion for this topic. :

Fear on the West Coast Watch this slideshow, investigate the link to the website for Manzanar , and follow the link to watch George Takei’s story on You Tube, then participate in the discussion for this topic.

Slide 2:

Pearl Harbor was thought to be completely safe from attack, but after Dec. 7, 1941, fear and panic spread to the West Coast where many people believed they could be next. This slideshow will help you understand the hysterical fear that consumed many Americans living on the West Coast during the early years of World War II. Remember that segregation was legal during this time period, and many groups were discriminated against openly in addition to African-Americans. Asians were often not regarded as “real” Americans, and after the war began, suspicion grew to into hysteria, resulting in the incarceration of American citizens who were not charged with any crime, had done nothing wrong, and, in many cases, had been a productive part of their communities for generations.

Slide 3:

Aircraft factory in Southern California

Slide 4:

The same aircraft factory under camouflage

Slide 5:

Working underneath the camouflage

Slide 6:

The camouflage going from ground level up over a building.

Slide 7:

The view from above – some trees and buildings are real, extending through the camo .

Slide 8:

Another view from the top.

Slide 9:

Entrance to controlled parking lot.

Slide 10:

Another view of parking lot.

Slide 11:

The covered tarmac.

Japanese-Americans and Executive Order 9066 February 1942:

Japanese-Americans and Executive Order 9066 February 1942

Why Intern Japanese-Americans?:

Why Intern Japanese-Americans? Asians were regularly discriminated against on the west coast, similar to African-Americans in South West Coast whites afraid of attack/invasion from Japan West Coast was closest to Japan Low military presence Hawaii was thought to be safe before Dec. 7 Widely believed that people of Japanese heritage would support their “race”, not the United States No evidence to support this suspicion FDR responded with Exec. Order 9066 American people in West pushed the fed government to act NOT fed government acting for security of nation

What Happened:

What Happened About 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans forced into internment camps Had to sell home, business, possessions Could take essentials (bedding, toiletries, clothing) 2/3 were US citizens, many young people and children There were no Japanese immigrants allowed in the US after 1922 Freed in 1945 No charges every filed, no proof of any disloyalty

Granada Relocation Camp, Amache, Colo. :

Granada Relocation Camp, Amache , Colo. Military style housing: three families in each barracks style building with no running water, so no bathroom or kitchen; had to use community latrines and mess hall

Slide 17:

Manzanar Camp, No. Calif ., National Historical Site today: website From guard tower in 1943 Guard tower today

Watch George Takei’s story on YouTube:

Watch George Takei’s story on YouTube

100th Infantry Battalion of 442nd Regimental Combat Team – Japanese-Americans:

100 th Infantry Battalion of 442 nd Regimental Combat Team – Japanese-Americans 21 Medals of Honor. Distinguished Service Crosses 1 Distinguished Service Medal 560 Silver Stars 22 Legion of Merit Medals 15 Soldier’s Medals 4,000 Bronze Stars 9,486 Purple Hearts 1988 – Pres. Reagan signed bill apologizing and allowing $20,000/person reparations for people who had been imprisoned, but did not extend to their families if they had already died

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