New York

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Achievement in New York: 

Achievement in New York

According to the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), only 34 percent of New York’s 4th graders read at the proficient level.: 

According to the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), only 34 percent of New York’s 4th graders read at the proficient level.

Though state test scores suggest much higher levels of proficiency, they show large gaps.: 

Though state test scores suggest much higher levels of proficiency, they show large gaps. 2004 New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP), Elementary Level - ELA Source: http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/statewide/2004statewideoverview.pdf

Similarly, when tested in 8th grade, only 32 percent of New York’s students possess proficient level math skills according to NAEP.: 

Similarly, when tested in 8th grade, only 32 percent of New York’s students possess proficient level math skills according to NAEP.

Here again, state assessment data show higher scores but large gaps.: 

Here again, state assessment data show higher scores but large gaps. 2004 New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP), Middle Level - Mathematics Source: http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/statewide/2004statewideoverview.pdf

In New York, the gap between African- American students’ scores and White students’ scores is one of the largest in the nation.: 

In New York, the gap between African- American students’ scores and White students’ scores is one of the largest in the nation.

Why does this gap in achievement exist?: 

Why does this gap in achievement exist?

African-American and Latino students are underrepresented in Advanced Placement courses.: 

African-American and Latino students are underrepresented in Advanced Placement courses.

African-American and Latino students also graduate from high school at much lower rates than their White counterparts.: 

African-American and Latino students also graduate from high school at much lower rates than their White counterparts.

Furthermore, New York lags behind top states in its college participation rates.: 

Furthermore, New York lags behind top states in its college participation rates.

New York ranks 4th in the nation for its education funding effort in relation to its per-capita income. : 

New York ranks 4th in the nation for its education funding effort in relation to its per-capita income. Source: Kevin Carey, “State Poverty-Based Education Funding: A Survey of Current Programs and Options for Improvement”, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, November 2002

However, New York’s per-student funding gap is one of the largest in the nation. Its high-poverty districts receive $1,672 less per student than its low-poverty districts.: 

However, New York’s per-student funding gap is one of the largest in the nation. Its high-poverty districts receive $1,672 less per student than its low-poverty districts. Source: Education Trust calculations based on U.S. Department of Education, school district revenue data for the 2000-2001 school year.

Slide13: 

That funding gap of $1,672 less per student in high-poverty districts translates into: $41,800 less per classroom of 25 each year $668,800 less per school of 400 each year. Source: Education Trust calculations based on U.S. Department of Education, school district revenue data for the 2000-2001 school year.

Similarly, New York’s high-minority districts receive about $1,720 less per student than low-minority districts. : 

Similarly, New York’s high-minority districts receive about $1,720 less per student than low-minority districts. That translates into: $43,000 less per classroom of 25 each year $688,800 less per school of 400 each year. Source: Education Trust calculations based on U.S. Department of Education, school district revenue data for the 2000-2001 school year.

Federal funding for K-12 in New York has increased by 55 percent since 2001.: 

Federal funding for K-12 in New York has increased by 55 percent since 2001. *Figures for FY 2005 and FY 2006 are estimated funding Source: Fiscal Year 2001-2006 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education, http://www.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/06stbystate.xls

Since NCLB went into effect in 2002, New York’s elementary math scores have increased 11 points.: 

Since NCLB went into effect in 2002, New York’s elementary math scores have increased 11 points. Source: New York State Education Department, http://www.nysed.gov/ New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP)

The African American/White elementary math gap narrowed by 10 points.: 

The African American/White elementary math gap narrowed by 10 points. Source: New York State Education Department, http://www.nysed.gov/ 38 26 36 New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP)

The Latino/White elementary math gap narrowed by 10 points.: 

The Latino/White elementary math gap narrowed by 10 points. Source: New York State Education Department, http://www.nysed.gov/ 36 22 32 New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP)

The Poor/Non Poor elementary math gap narrowed by 11 points.: 

The Poor/Non Poor elementary math gap narrowed by 11 points. Source: New York State Education Department, http://www.nysed.gov/ 21 32 31 New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP)

However, New York has not shown progress in elementary English since NCLB went into effect.: 

However, New York has not shown progress in elementary English since NCLB went into effect. Source: New York State Education Department, http://www.nysed.gov/ New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP)

The African American/White elementary English gap narrowed by 3 points.: 

The African American/White elementary English gap narrowed by 3 points. Source: New York State Education Department, http://www.nysed.gov/ 35 29 32 New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP)

The Latino/White elementary English gap narrowed by 5 points.: 

The Latino/White elementary English gap narrowed by 5 points. Source: New York State Education Department, http://www.nysed.gov/ 35 27 32 New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP)

The Poor/Non Poor elementary English gap narrowed by 6 points.: 

The Poor/Non Poor elementary English gap narrowed by 6 points. Source: New York State Education Department, http://www.nysed.gov/ 27 33 34 New York State Assessment Program (NYSAP)

Some of New York’s schools have been particularly successful in helping all students to succeed.: 

Some of New York’s schools have been particularly successful in helping all students to succeed.

Lincoln School Mount Vernon City, NY: 

Lincoln School Mount Vernon City, NY 49% African American 28% White 21% Latino 48% Low Income 27% LEP Made AYP for 2003-04 New York State Education Department, http://emsc33.nysed.gov/;

Astronomical Achievement Grade 4 – English/Language Arts: 

Astronomical Achievement Grade 4 – English/Language Arts Source: http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/overview-analysis/660900010006.pdf

Astronomical Achievement Grade 4 – English/Language Arts: 

Astronomical Achievement Grade 4 – English/Language Arts Source: http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/overview-analysis/660900010006.pdf

Astronomical Achievement Grade 4 – Mathematics: 

Astronomical Achievement Grade 4 – Mathematics Source: http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/overview-analysis/660900010006.pdf

All Students Learn Grade 4 – Mathematics: 

All Students Learn Grade 4 – Mathematics Source: http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/overview-analysis/660900010006.pdf

Turtle Hook Middle School Uniondale, NY: 

Turtle Hook Middle School Uniondale, NY 68% African American 30% Latino 33% Low Income Performed as well or better than 64 percent of all New York middle schools in 8th-grade math in 2002 Made AYP for 2003-04 SOURCE: http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/cir/280202030009.pdf; http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/school-accountability/280202030009.pdf

Continuous Improvement at Turtle Hook 1999 to 2004 Grade 8 Math: 

Continuous Improvement at Turtle Hook 1999 to 2004 Grade 8 Math SOURCE: Dispelling the Myth Online, http://www.edtrust.org; http://www.nysed.gov; http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/overview-analysis/280202030009.pdf

Elmont Memorial Junior-Senior High Elmont, NY: 

Elmont Memorial Junior-Senior High Elmont, NY 75% African American 12% Latino 11% Asian/Pacific Islander/American Ind. 3% White 24% Low Income Source: http://emsc33.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/cir/280252070002.pdf

High Achievement in Mathematics: 

High Achievement in Mathematics Source: http://emsc33.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/overview-analysis/280252070002.pdf

High Achievement in English: 

High Achievement in English Source: http://emsc33.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/overview-analysis/280252070002.pdf

authorStream Live Help