6 Beautiful Things to Know About Holi the Indian Festival of Colours

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The golden rays of the rising sun pierce through layers of white clouds in the blue sky. The dawn marks the start of another day in India, but something’s unusually different today.

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Presentation Transcript

6 Beautiful Things to Know About Holi the Indian Festival of Colours:

6 Beautiful Things to Know About Holi the Indian Festival of  Colours

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“The best and the most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched. They must be felt with the heart.” – Helen Keller The golden rays of the rising sun pierce through layers of white clouds in the blue sky. The dawn marks the start of another day in India, but something’s unusually different today. Unlike every other morning when the dusty roads of this bustling country are crowded with citizens following their quotidian routines, today there is something distinctive that’s made the streets empty and everyone all excited. Today, a cheerful mood hangs over the entire country, there is abundant joy in people’s hearts, and its warm glow radiating from their faces is hard to miss. Today, it is Holi . The arbiter between winter and spring, Holi is one of the most important festivals that is celebrated by India in its entirety. No matter which corner of the country you belong or travel to, you’ll find that people commemorate Holi with the same degree of passion, pomp and splendour . Revellers throw powdered dye with abandon, spray coloured water, and flood the streets for raucous fun. Eagerly awaiting the day’s arrival, people prepare their Holi gear much earlier by purchasing the powder and kids practice their aim.

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Here are six beautiful things about Holi , the  festival of  colour . #1. It promotes the message of brotherhood & peace

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The Holi festival offers an opportunity to forget all differences and indulge in unadulterated fun. Celebrated in high spirits, it dissolves any distinction of caste, creed, colour , race, status or gender among the revellers . Indians use this occasion to bury old rivalries, mend broken relations and form new friendships by sprinkling coloured powder (or  gulal ) on each other.

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#2. Today many cast and religions celebrate Holi Although traditionally this  festival of colours  is a Hindu holiday, nowadays many religions, sects and castes in India join in the celebration. Such is the spirit among the people that it removes all socio-economic distinctions and behavioural norms, most stunningly the Indian caste system, which usually enforces strict separation between the high and low-born. Children throw gulal on adults, employees throw it on bosses, and even the rich and powerful are fair game.

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#3. It signifies the victory of good over evil Ever wondered why Holi is celebrated? The festival derives its name from Holika , the demoness sister of evil King Hiranyakashyap (in Hindu mythology) who was defeated by Lord Vishnu. Each year, Indians celebrate the night before Holi as Holika Dahan where Hindus light a symbolic effigy to commemorate the demise of Holika . This celebration serves as a reminder of the triumph of good over evil, reflecting the Hindu belief that faith and devotion lead to salvation that can be attained by everyone who believes.

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#4. The harbinger of spring The  festival of colours  has an ecological significance. During Holi , both nature and people join in the festivities, leaving behind the cold gloom of winter and rejoicing in the warm colours of spring. The celebration heralds the arrival of the spring season, bringing with its renewal of crops and nature. #5. Holi -themed wedding parties are a big hit What’s the element common to a big community festival like Holi and big fat Indian weddings? It’s the hours and hours of merriment with family and friends, and the fun includes lip-smacking dishes and peppy music. Modern to-be-wed couples have taken it upon themselves to infuse their pre-wedding celebrations with the vibrancy and excitement of the festival of colours . Nowadays, Holi -themed weddings parties are the new Indian trend as they scream fun, which eventually leads to joyful and lively photos.

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#6. Even foreigners participate in Holi festivities Even though Holi is celebrated predominantly in India, the  festival of colours  has garnered a large fan following that spans beyond its borders — from neighbouring countries like Bangladesh and Pakistan, to countries with large Indian diaspora like Suriname, South Africa, and Malaysia to Western parts of the world like The United Kingdom and the United States. Today, it’s not just Indians but even foreigners that celebrate the  Holi festival   via parties, concerts, and events across the country, making it possible for many to join the festivities.

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Holi might not be India’s biggest festival, but  Holi images  are unquestionably the most picturesque. Experiencing such a mesmerising experience is what many people have on their bucket lists. Do you?

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