fun and games

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Learning Engagement through Fun andamp; Games: A Research Perspective Dawn Mercer and Margot Wassenaar-Faber Inukshuk A project sponsored in part by:

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Games and learning: Motivate – fun and challenging Learner-centered Immediate feedback Problem-solving Active learning Experiential learning Problem-based learning

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Approaches to Game Design - Reiber (1996) Exogenous Approach Play is an overlay on predetermined content. Enticement to engage in learning tasks that would otherwise be unpleasant (de Castell andamp; Jensen, 2005) Endogenous Approach Content is intrinsic to the game play Learning is incidental to play – 'stealth learning' (Prensky, 2001)

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Examples in Biosciences Chemania Matching chemical names with sounds and formulae Exogenous – play based drill andamp; practice Bacteria Blitz Locate fictional bacteria and identify tools and agents to eliminate them. Endogenous - timed exploration

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Bacteria Blitz

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Learnings – 100% of users Bacteria can be eliminated using different methods Different bacteria are eliminated better by some chemicals that others

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Further Research: Time comparison for knowledge acquisition

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Topic: Inorganic nomenclature Instructional component: lecture series Importance: Consistency in the correct recognition in lab environment for the purposes of conducting lab exercises Immediacy of nomenclature recognition

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Reinforcement provided by immediate feedback (i.e. correctness of response) Option(s) for supporting cues (i.e. hint) Integration of performance expectations (i.e. recommendation that a ‘task’ achieve a specific score within a specified time limit before proceeding to next level)

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Game 1 – auditory prompt Madame Curie states the name of an ion; the player must identify the correct formula from symbols on the screen. Game modes: Bunsen mode (10 questions) Pasteur mode (15 questions) Curie mode (20 questions)

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Game 2 The chemical formula is provided; the ‘player’ must identify the correct name. Game modes: Bunsen mode (10 questions) Pasteur mode (15 questions) Curie mode (20 questions)

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Demo

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Research: Survey conducted in the Spring of 2006 Chm173 (Intro College Chemistry) students: Gender: 64 female 61 male Ages: under 20 years  48 21 – 25 years  59 26 – 30 years  7 30+ years  10 Semester affiliation: 88 semester 1 34 semester 2 (repeating)

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Results: Learning value

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Results: Value Added

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Further Research: Correlation between the use of Chemania andamp; test/exam performance Fall 2006 (210 – 240 students) Spring 2007

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Further Development: Expand the game to include naming of compounds by combination of cations andamp; anions Explore modes in which students will be able to practice writing formulas (i.e. test requirement) Make Chemania available to other courses in which chemical nomenclature is needed for review (i.e., second semester general chemistry, organic chemistry, general biology)

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Technology Enhanced Learning Institute: York University andamp; Seneca College Partially funded by CLOE–Inukshuk Content Development Project Content and Development: Seneca College School of Communication Arts Seneca College School of Computer Science Seneca College School of Biological Sciences andamp; Applied Chemistry

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games References Castell, S. and Jenson, J. (2005). Serious Play: Challenges of Educational Game Design. Journal of Curriculum Studies. Prensky, M. (2001). Digital game-based learning. New York: McGraw-Hill. Prensky, M. (2002). The Motovation of Gameplay. On the Horozon, Vol. 10 No. 1. Rieber, L. P. (1996). Seriously considering play: Designing interactive learning environments based on the blending of microworlds. Educational Technology Research and Development, Vol. 44 N o. 2.

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Game access Through CLOE http://cloe.on.ca/ Bacteria Blitz (Temporary) https://uwice.uwaterloo.ca/AngelUploads/Content/None-UW-LT3-CLOE-001/_team/Surface_Cleaning_Game/Cleaning%20Game/CleaningProject_v8.html Chemania (Temporary) http://contagion.edu.yorku.ca/Dima/Chem/

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Learning Engagement through Fun and Games Contact Information: Dawn Mercer dawn.mercer@senecac.on.ca Margot Wassenaar-Faber Margot.Wassenaar-Faber@senecac.on.ca Nick Taylor nttaylor@rogers.com

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