cis wsh extreme safety 161422 7

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Presented By: Consultation Education and Training (CET) Division Michigan Occupational Safety andamp; Health Administration Michigan Department of Labor andamp; Economic Growth www.michigan.gov/miosha (517) 322-1809 Extreme Rider Gary Taylor www.extreme.com

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Receive MIOSHA CET Training and Division Announcements Via Email MIOSHA Consultation Education and Training (CET) Division has established an electronic mailing list (LISTSERV) to inform subscribers of upcoming MIOSHA training programs and announcements. If you would like to be added to this list, please visit: www.michigan.gov/mioshatraining If you need further assistance, please contact: MIOSHA Consultation Education and Training Division (517) 322-1809

Extreme Safety Training Overview: 

Extreme Safety Training Overview Identify why teens work Identify where teens work Review teen worker injury statistics Discuss teen worker rights andamp; responsibilities Identify common workplace injuries Identify common hazards to teen workers in industries employing teen workers Testimonies of real teen workers Identify agencies and authorities that can provide assistance

Why Do Teens Work?: 

Why Do Teens Work? MONEY!!!! Work experience Independence Parental influence

Where Do Teens Work?By Industry: 

Where Do Teens Work? By Industry Agriculture Amusement andamp; Recreation Camps andamp; Trailer Parks Construction Department/Retail Stores Food Canning andamp; Processing Fruit andamp; Vegetable Stores Gifts/Sporting Goods/Bookstores Grocery Stores Hotels andamp; Motels Landscape andamp; Horticulture Services Museums/Galleries/Zoos Restaurants Warehousing

Where Do Teens Work?By Occupation: 

Where Do Teens Work? By Occupation Camp Counselor/Day Care Worker Car Washer Cashier Construction Helper Delivery Person Farm Hand/Landscape Helper Fast Food Worker Food Market Clerk Golf Course Worker Library Aide Office Clerk Receptionist Sales Clerk Stock Clerk Usher/Attendant Waiter Waitress

Teens Do Get Hurt And Sick On The Job: 

Teens Do Get Hurt And Sick On The Job Teens are injured at higher rates than adults 230,000 teens are injured at work annually 100,000 teens visit the emergency room due to work related injuries 70 TEENS ARE KILLED ON THE JOB EACH YEAR

Why Are Teens Injured More Than Adults?: 

Why Are Teens Injured More Than Adults? High turnover jobs Speed-up Stressful conditions Inexperience Poor safety training/Lack of supervision Want to be responsible and appear competent Unsafe equipment Unlikely to question unsafe conditions

Teen Workers Have Rights!!: 

Teen Workers Have Rights!! Right to a safe and healthy workplace Right to training about safety and health hazards, including information on chemicals and materials that could be harmful to your health Right to protective clothing and equipment Right to work without racial or sexual harassment Right to refuse to work if the job is immediately dangerous to your life or health Right to report safety and health problems to MIOSHA

Be Responsible to…: 

Be Responsible to… Trust your instincts about dangerous situations Follow all safety rules Wear proper safety equipment Ask questions about potentially dangerous situations or equipment Tell your supervisor or parent if you suspect unsafe conditions Work safely Be aware of your work environment Stay sober and drug free Know your workplace rights

Common Workplace Hazards And Injuries: 

Common Workplace Hazards And Injuries Slips, trips and falls Strains and sprains Chemical exposure Burns and cuts Eye injuries Hearing loss Motor vehicle crashes Electrocution Machinery malfunctions

Common Injuries Sustained by Teens: 

Common Injuries Sustained by Teens Cuts 34% Contusions 18% Sprains 16% Burns 12% Fractures 4%

Is It Ok To Do Any Kind Of Work?……: 

Is It Ok To Do Any Kind Of Work?…… Drive a motor vehicle as part of the job (pizza delivery, etc). Drive a forklift. Use power driven equipment, saws or machinery (box crusher, circular saw, meat slicer, woodworking machinery, bakery machines, paper product machines, metal-forming, punching and shearing machines). Slaughtering, butchering and meat cutting. Work in construction, wrecking, demolition, excavation, bridges or roofing. Come in contact with hazardous substances, chemicals, explosives or radioactive substances. Work in logging or sawmill. Perform brazing, welding, soldering or heat treating (those less than 16 years of age). In Michigan Workers Under 18 May Not:

Restricted Work: 

Restricted Work Special approval for some restricted work for 16- and 17-year-olds may be authorized. Employers must apply for special approval to the Wage andamp; Hour Division. Call (517) 335-0400 or visit the website at www.michigan.gov/wagehour

Common Teen Worker Hazards: 

Common Teen Worker Hazards Restaurants Meat slicers Knives Hot grease Slippery floors Hot surfaces E-tool www.osha.gov/SLTC/youth/restaurant

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont.: 

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont. Grocery andamp; Retail Stores Case-cutters Heavy or awkward lifting Slippery floors Repetitive movements (i.e., using cash register, price guns) E-tool http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/teenworkers

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont.: 

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont. Agriculture Dangerous machinery (e.g., forklifts, tractors, packing machinery) Heavy or awkward lifting Pesticides Falls from ladders

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont.: 

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont. Convenience Stores/Gas Stations Knives Hot equipment Slippery floors Cash register/scanner Violence/Working alone

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont.: 

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont. Custodial/Janitorial Toxic chemicals in cleaning products Asbestos Trash/Blood on discarded needles Heavy lifting Slips, trips, and falls

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont.: 

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont. Landscape/Horticulture/Parks andamp; Recreation Heat Animal bites Insect bites Noise Malfunctioning equipment

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont.: 

Common Teen Worker Hazards cont. Office Computers andamp; Word Processing (back, eye, neck, shoulder strain) Telephone (tangled cord, no cradling) Paper cutters (guard) Paper Shredder (loose clothing, jams)

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Not Careful Enough??? Real Teen Worker Stories: 

Not Careful Enough??? Real Teen Worker Stories Girl Blinded by Chemicals Jamie is a 17-year-old dietary aide in hospital. To clean cooking pans, she soaks them in a powerful chemical solution. She uses gloves to protect her hands and arms. One day, as Jaime was lifting 3 large pans out of the chemical solution at once, the pans slipped out of her hands and back into the solution which splashed all over the right side of her face and into her right eye. Jaime was blinded in that eye for 2 weeks. LOHP/EDC:young worker safety resource center

Not Careful Enough??? Real Teen Worker Stories cont.: 

Not Careful Enough??? Real Teen Worker Stories cont. Boy Crushes Fingers in Pizza Dough Machine Andy is a 17-year-old pizza shop employee. To make pizzas, Andy starts by putting pizza dough through an electronic dough roller to roll out the pizza crust. One day, the dough got stuck in the machine. Andy tried to push the dough through with his hand. Andy’s hand got stuck between the two rollers, crushing two fingers on his left hand. LOHP/EDC:young worker safety resource center

Not Careful Enough??? Real Teen Worker Stories cont.: 

Not Careful Enough??? Real Teen Worker Stories cont. Girl Contracts Hepatitis B at Summer Job Tanya is a 15-year-old employee of a Summer clean-up corps. One day while Tanya was picking up trash, her hand was struck with a hypodermic needle. Tanya was later tested and diagnosed with Hepatitis B virus. LOHP/EDC:young worker safety resource center

Not Careful Enough??? Real Teen Worker Stories cont.: 

Not Careful Enough??? Real Teen Worker Stories cont. Boy Suffers Permanent Injury at Work A 16-year-old student worked at a fast food restaurant. The floor often got very greasy and had to be washed a lot. As the student walked across the wet floor carrying a basket of fries, he slipped. He tried to keep the fries from falling so he couldn’t break his fall with his hands. He fell on his tailbone and was seriously injured. He now is permanently disabled and has trouble walking. LOHP/EDC:young worker safety resource center

Who You Gonna Call?: 

Who You Gonna Call?

Help Before the Job: 

Help Before the Job Job Readiness Counselors Provide training to teens Serve as a resource and advocate Provide information to parents Promote job safety

Educators/School Counselors: 

Educators/School Counselors Help Before andamp; During the Job Serve as a resource and advocate Provide information to parents Work permits Provide information to employers about labor laws Discuss on-site health and safety training for youth Report and follow-up on reported unsafe work conditions

Parents: 

Parents Help Before andamp; During the Job Serve as a resource and advocate Provide information to educators, labor organizations Come on!!! Talk to them if you have questions. Parents know more than you think!!!

MIOSHAMichigan Occupational Safety & Health Administration: 

MIOSHA Michigan Occupational Safety andamp; Health Administration Serves as a resource and advocate for preventing injury and illness in the workplace. Provides information to employers about labor laws Discusses Occupational Health and Safety Regulations with employers Follow-ups on reported serious health and safety problems in the workplace. Call 1-800-866-4674 or visit the website at www.michigan.gov/miosha

Stay Safe On The Job!!!: 

Stay Safe On The Job!!! Over 30,000 teens aged 16-19 are expected to seek jobs this Summer in Michigan. Many for the first time. Governor Jennifer M. Granholm Says: 'By providing valuable and safe summer work experiences today, our employers are empowering them with the skills they need to find good jobs in the future.'

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 Michigan Occupational Safety andamp; Health Administration Consultation Education andamp; Training Division 7150 Harris Drive, P.O. Box 30643 Lansing, Michigan 48909-8143   For further information or to request consultation, education and training services, call (517) 322-1809 or visit our website at www.michigan.gov/miosha Thank you For Attending This Presentation www.michigan.gov/dleg

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