IOA US aging demographics revised 1106

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By: trygstad (110 month(s) ago)

excellent over-view of age wave coming

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United States Aging Demographics: 

United States Aging Demographics Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Last revised October 2006

Population Changes: 

Population Changes According to US Census Bureau projections, the elderly population will more than double between 2000 and 2030, growing from 35 million to over 70 million. Much of this growth is attributed to the 'baby boom' generation which will enter their elderly years between 2010 and 2030. The most populous States are also the ones with the largest number of elderly. However, the States with the greatest proportion of elderly are generally different from those with the greatest number. Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, '65+ in the United States: 2005,' December 2005.

The Graying of AmericaPercent of Total U.S. Population over 65 in 2000: 

The Graying of America Percent of Total U.S. Population over 65 in 2000 Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, State Interim Projections by Age and Sex: 2004-2030, 2005.

The Graying of AmericaPercent of Total U.S. Population over 65 in 2030: 

The Graying of America Percent of Total U.S. Population over 65 in 2030 Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, State Interim Projections by Age and Sex: 2004-2030, 2005.

U.S. Population Pyramids: 

U.S. Population Pyramids Source of charts: U.S. Census Bureau, '65+ in the United States: 2005,' December 2005. 2000 2020 2040

The Oldest Old: 

The Oldest Old The 'oldest old' – those aged 85 and over – are the most rapidly growing elderly age group. The oldest old represented 12.1% of the elderly population in 2000 and 1.5% of the total population. In 2050, they are projected to be 24% of elderly Americans and 5% of all Americans. Centenarians – those aged 100 or more – represent a small but growing number of elderly Americans. The 1990 census reported 37,000 centenarians, while Census 2000 reported 50,000 centenarians in the United States. Sources of data: U.S. Census Bureau, '65+ in the United States: 2005,' December 2005; U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Interim Projections by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin, 2004.

Increases in the Oldest OldU.S. Population Aged 85+ (in millions): 

Increases in the Oldest Old U.S. Population Aged 85+ (in millions) Sources of data: U.S. Census Bureau, '65+ in the United States: 2005,' December 2005; U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Interim Projections by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin, 2004.

Gender, Race & Class: 

Gender, Race andamp; Class Facts about gender, race and class among the elderly: Elderly women outnumber elderly men. The elderly are becoming more racially and ethnically diverse. Poverty rates rise with advancing age. Implications: The effects of aging are compounded by the additional effects of race, class and gender and result in higher risks for health and social problems. Major implications include increased demand for support services, greater need for long term care solutions, and higher expenditures for health care and services.

Women Live LongerU.S. Population by Gender and Age (2000): 

Women Live Longer U.S. Population by Gender and Age (2000) Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, State Interim Population Projections by Age and Sex: 2004-2030, 2005. All Ages Age 65+ Female 50.9% Male 49.1% Female 58.8% Male 41.2% Age 85+ Female 71.1% Male 28.9%

Older Women More Likely to Live AloneLiving Arrangements of Older Adults in U.S. (2003): 

Older Women More Likely to Live Alone Living Arrangements of Older Adults in U.S. (2003) MEN WOMEN Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, America's Families and Living Arrangements: 2003, Current Population Reports, P20-553, November 2004.

Racial Differences in AgingRacial Background of U.S. Elderly (2000): 

Racial Differences in Aging Racial Background of U.S. Elderly (2000) *Note: Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Interim Projections by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin, 2004.

Projected ChangesRacial Background of U.S. Elderly (2050): 

Projected Changes Racial Background of U.S. Elderly (2050) *Note: Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Interim Projections by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin, 2004.

Income and Aging Total Money Income of U.S. Households (2005): 

Income and Aging Total Money Income of U.S. Households (2005) Mean Median Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic Supplement, Table HINC-02, 2006.

Wealth Levels Median Net Worth of Elderly U.S. Households (2000): 

Wealth Levels Median Net Worth of Elderly U.S. Households (2000) Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, Net Worth and Asset Ownership of Households: 1998 and 2000, Current Population Reports, P70-88, May 2003.

At Risk from PovertyPercent of 65+ in Poverty in the U.S. (2005): 

At Risk from Poverty Percent of 65+ in Poverty in the U.S. (2005) Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic Supplement, 2006. All 65+ persons 10.1%

Differences in Life ExpectancyRemaining Life Expectancy at age 65 (2003): 

Differences in Life Expectancy Remaining Life Expectancy at age 65 (2003) Source of data: National Vital Statistics Report, Vol. 54, No. 14, April 19, 2006.

Older Adults More Likely to Have DisabilitiesPercent of Americans with Disabilities (2002): 

Older Adults More Likely to Have Disabilities Percent of Americans with Disabilities (2002) Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, Americans with Disabilities: 2002, Current Population Reports, P70-107, May 2006.

Chronic Health ProblemsPercent of 65+ with selected conditions, 2003-2004: 

Chronic Health Problems Percent of 65+ with selected conditions, 2003-2004 Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, Older Americans Update 2006: Key Indicators of Well-Being, May 2006.

Rising Health Care CostsAverage annual expenses for Medicare recipients: 

Rising Health Care Costs Average annual expenses for Medicare recipients Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, Older Americans Update 2006: Key Indicators of Well-Being, May 2006.

Moving to the Sun BeltNet Migration of 65+ Population, 1995-2000: 

Moving to the Sun Belt Net Migration of 65+ Population, 1995-2000 Source of data: U.S. Census Bureau, Internal Migration of the Older Population: 1995-2000, August 2003. Negative Net Migration Positive Net Migration

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