Private Security Contractors RSL

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Questionable Benefits: Private Military Firms in Iraq: 

Questionable Benefits: Private Military Firms in Iraq Ryan S. Lewis 2006 Student Research Conference * *Gaviria, Marcia. “Baghdad from a Bulletproof Window” Posted June 21, 2005 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/warriors/art/repp2.jpg

Introduction: 

Introduction Unprecedented Employment by US government of Private Military Firms, PMFs, in Iraq. (1) 2nd Largest Fighting Force (2) At least 270 have been killed. (3) Numerous Problems in Iraq: Friendly-Fire to Murder Project Objective: Who benefits from the employment of Private Military Firms in Iraq?

What are Private Military Firms?: 

What are Private Military Firms? Corporations that provide military services: (4) Corporation, Not Mercenaries: “Business profit driven.” (5) Articles 3 & 4 of the Geneva Convention. (6) Growing Demand: End of Cold War and War on Terror

Advantages & Disadvantages of PMFs: 

Advantages & Disadvantages of PMFs According to the Bush Administration: PMFs saves money (7) Lower the number U.S. Forces deployed (8) (9) Fully-qualified (10) According to U.S. military & civilian officials: “There’s no authority over them.” (11) Alteration entry plans into Fallujah due to March 31, 2004 incident. (12) No current regulations

Advantages & Disadvantages of PMFs: 

Advantages & Disadvantages of PMFs President Bush at Johns Hopkins University, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, April 10, 2006 play

Operational Drawbacks: 

Operational Drawbacks Violent May 2005, Fallujah: 19 contractors of Zapata –friendly fire -- U.S. Marines. (13) U.S. Navy did not file charges. (14) November 2005, Baghdad: “Trophy” Video (15) No charges have been filed. Non-Violent Beyond the Fallujah strategy (16) Inability to complete Contract Requirements. Parsons Inc. clinic problem. (17) Sub-Contract to Sub-Contract

Political & Contractor Benefits: : 

Political & Contractor Benefits: Connections and Lobbying Halliburton (KBR)18) Vinnell Corporation (‘90-’02). (19) Bechtel Group (20) $500,000 to 2000 Bush-Cheney. Non-Competitive Selection Thomas Cruikshank, Former Halliburton C.E.O Duane Andrews (Science Applications International)(21) PMFs: Booming Buisness

Conclusions: 

Conclusions Increased Employment: Regulations NEEDED: Implementation of DFARS amendment Recommended use of NROC Problem: Implementation. U.S. Foreign Policy: Privatization Evolution Counter-insurgency challenged? *New York Times, April 2, 2004 http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/02/national/02SECU.html

Bibliography: 

Bibliography (1) Associated Press. “U.S. private security in Iraq: Congress uneasy over blurred lines between soldiers and private security.” The Billings Gazette, April 28, 2004. (2) Merle, Renae and Griff Witte, Washington Post. “Security Costs Slow Iraq Reconstruction: Contract Excesses Also Hamper Progress.” July 29, 2005 and viewed December 2005. (3) Pugliese, David, CanWest News Service. “Senator seeks federal ban on Canadian mercenaries: Private Security firms should be off-limits, say former Canadian Forces general.” November 17, 2005. (4) Singer, Peter W. Corporate Warriors: The Rise of Privatized Military Industry. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003, 8. (5) Singer, Peter W. Corporate Warriors: The Rise of Privatized Military Industry. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003, 47. (6) Carter, Phillip, Slate News. “Hired Guns: What to do about military contractors run amok.” www.slate.com/id/2098571, April 9, 2004. (7) Finer, Jonathan, Washington Post Foreign Service. “Security Contractors in Iraq Under Scrutiny After Shootings.” www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09, September 10, 2005.

Bibliography: 

Bibliography (8) Finer, Jonathan, Washington Post Foreign Service. “Security Contractors in Iraq Under Scrutiny After Shootings.” www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09, September 10, 2005. (9) Singer, Peter W. Corporate Warriors: The Rise of Privatized Military Industry. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003, 6. (10) Singer, Peter W. Corporate Warriors: The Rise of Privatized Military Industry. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003, 77. (11) Finer, Jonathan, Washington Post Foreign Service. “Security Contractors in Iraq Under Scrutiny After Shootings.” www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09, September 10, 2005. (12) Smith, Martian, PBS Frontline. “Private Warriors.” http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/warriors/faqs//, posted June 21, 2005 viewed January 13, 2006.

Bibliography: 

Bibliography (13) Associated Press. “Contractor accuses Marines of abuse.” June 11, 2005 and viewed January 2006. (14) Witte, Griff and Josh White, Washington Post Staff Writers. “Navy Won’t File Charges in Iraq Contractor Fracas.” www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/23, March 25, 2006. (15)Rayment, Sean, Defense Correspondent. “‘Trophy’ video exposes private security contractors shooting Iraqi drivers.” www.telegraph.co.uk/core/Content/, November 27, 2005. (16) Smith, Martin, PBS Frontline On-Line Video “Private Warriors”. www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/warrirors/view/, posted June 21, 2005 and viewed January 13, 2006. (17) Knickmeyer, Ellen, Washington Post Foreign Service. “U.S. Plan to Build Iraq Clinics Falters.” www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/02, April 3, 2006.

Bibliography: 

Bibliography (18) Mayer, Jane. “Contract Sport” The New Yorker. Issue 2004-02-16 and 2003, www.newyorker.com/printables/fact/040216, posted February 9, 2004. (19) Tsetsi, Eric. “The Profits of War: Reconstruction in Iraq.” http://towardfreedom.com/home/index2.php, April 6, 2006. (20) Tsetsi, Eric. “The Profits of War: Reconstruction in Iraq.” http://towardfreedom.com/home/index2.php, April 6, 2006. (21) Mayer, Jane. “Contract Sport” The New Yorker. Issue 2004-02-16 and 2003, www.newyorker.com/printables/fact/040216, posted February 9, 2004.

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