Part One and Part Two

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Intro to Community Leadership

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Three Core Competencies for Community Leadership:

Three Core Competencies for Community Leadership Part One

Three Core Competencies:

Three Core Competencies The three Core Competencies for Community Leadership are: Framing ideas Building social capital Mobilizing resources

Products:

Products As we explore these three core competencies it is important for us to understand the difference between product and process Products are what gets done – specific outcomes, programs or changes in the community Process is how you get there – how things get done in the community – what gets included, how decisions are made, the way people work together.

The Relationship of the Three Core Competencies:

The Relationship of the Three Core Competencies Products that result from the Process come about from the relationship of the Three Core Competencies Framing ideas: A community can define opportunities and issues in ways that lead to effective action. Through framing a group understands and decides what needs to be done, how it is to be done, and why it is important

The Relationship of the Three Core Competencies:

The Relationship of the Three Core Competencies Building Social Capital This means developing and maintaining relationships that allow people to work together. In the process, they share resources to address community opportunities and issues. Having social capital means we can call on and depend upon one another to get things done.

The Relationship of the Three Core Competencies:

The Relationship of the Three Core Competencies Mobilizing resources This involves organizing and engaging a critical mass to take action to achieve specific outcomes. Gaining a critical mass means getting enough people, financial resources, voters, and organizations to make the project a reality.

Framing:

Framing Framing is something that we do in our daily lives. We are confronted with problems to solve on a variety of issues So we have to decide what needs to be done to solve it, why it is important to solve it, and how our solution can be implemented. It is no different when we are framing in community leadership activities

Framing:

Framing Framing can be complex, however. Framing has at least four connected aspects Analysis Values Motivation Vision Strategy

Framing:

Framing Analysis means finding out what is happening, what is the current reality. Values and motivation means we ask why should we do something about this, and what should guide our action Creating a vision means asking if we do something to change or respond to this current reality, what do we want the new reality to look like Strategy means asking ourselves how do we achieve this new reality that we have envisioned

Framing:

Framing Framing creates focus So basically, this is what students do in SOC 1300 – it is the beginning. Through framing, you choose what you pay attention to, what is important to you, and why you want to give energy to it.

Building and Using Social Capital:

Building and Using Social Capital Building social capital is developing and maintaining relationships that allow us to work together and share resources This is a component that you will be doing in SOC 4890 These relationships can be between Individuals An individual and a group Groups

Building and Using Social Capital:

Building and Using Social Capital Relationships that yield social capital are marked by: Trust: the believe in and reliance on the honesty, integrity and reliability of the other party. Reciprocity: a mutual, fair benefit from the relationship over time. Durability: lasting over time through stress and changing circumstances.

Building and Using Social Capital:

Building and Using Social Capital Community action takes place through human relationships You cannot get something done in the community unless you have relationships with people who can help you make these changes. Social capital flows through networks Through these relationships, you will build networks which are important for you in order to build a group of people who will support your cause This happens in two forms: Bonding social capital Bridging social capital

Building and Using Social Capital:

Building and Using Social Capital Bonding social capital is the form of social capital that is most often found in groups that interaction with each other frequently Members tend to know each other – they have relationships with one another Bridging social capital is the kind that happens when you connect with those outside of your usual social network These networks and bridge you to diverse individuals and groups that you may not normally interact with

Mobilizing Resources:

Mobilizing Resources Mobilizing Resources is the leadership competency of engaging a critical mass in taking action A critical mass is achieved when community leaders bring together enough people and resources to do what the community wants done. Fro a leadership perspective, mobilization is about strategic, planned, purposeful activity to achieve clearly defined outcomes.

Mobilizing Resources:

Mobilizing Resources Mobilizing critical mass requires the ability to move others to speak and act in support of the goals Successful mobilization requires that leaders stimulate conversations that move others to speak and act in support of the leader’s goals

Mobilizing Resources:

Mobilizing Resources Engaging people who have access to key networks is when you connect with diverse networks that play a major role in building social capital Leverage happens when you apply enough energy on one point to get another point to move (like a lever) Community leaders need to ask two questions pertaining to leverage: First relates to where the leverage is applied Second, Do we have the right person to tap into this network – does this person have enough social capital

Mobilizing Resources:

Mobilizing Resources Directly involving large numbers of people throughout the community This isn’t just about getting people to speak favorably on your project – it is about getting people to do the work that produces the desired results – the products from the process

Combining the Competencies:

Combining the Competencies In some, social capital helps people manage differences in framing So framing is really important since it can increase or decrease social capital Effecting framing makes it easier to mobilize resources Social capital is required to mobilize resources, so it starts from framing, but you also need people. Mobilizing resources can increase or decrease social capital

Tools for Framing Ideas:

Tools for Framing Ideas Part Two – Tool 1: Identify Community Assets

Tools for Framing Ideas:

Tools for Framing Ideas Identifying Community Assets Offers a process for pulling diverse parts of your community together to discover and build on its opportunities and strengths Analyzing Community Problems Presents steps for reaching agreement on what needs to be changed in your community Accessing Community Data Explains a number of ways to find relevant facts about your community Doing Appreciative Inquiry Breaks the cycle of frustration and discouragement by focusing on what is working in your community and why it is working, and how to maintain it. Visioning Gives steps for producing a clear, compelling direction for your community’s future Translating Vision into Action Helps you focus your efforts by choosing priorities, success indicators, and goals

Tool 1: Identifying Community Assets:

Tool 1: Identifying Community Assets Assets are resources with economic or social value to the community Asset mapping : When community members decide to use their assets, they start by considering each part of the community and capturing information about the assets that exist there

Tool 1: Identifying Community Assets:

Tool 1: Identifying Community Assets You can do three major types of asset mapping: Targeted asset mapping What resources do we have to achieve our goals Identifies skills and interests, uncovers organizational resources that can attract partnerships Use this type after goals are set Visionary asset mapping What strategies will best leverage our strengths? Used to revisit direction or planning new projects – also reviews the strengths and capacities Use to choose strategies that align with vision statement Mobilizing asset mapping How can we get more people actively involved? Identifies the common interests, passions and dreams of a group The goal is to connect people so they can brainstorm ways to act together on their passtions – can build social capital

Tool 1: Identifying Community Assets:

Tool 1: Identifying Community Assets When asset mapping, you need to consider five key parts of community: Individuals Organizations Institutions Physical environment Methods of exchange

Tool 1: Identifying Community Assets:

Tool 1: Identifying Community Assets Asset inventories: The data for asset mapping comes from brainstorming, informal research and surveys. Successful asset-mapping projects are customized to local communities, so this tool is used as a guide – to spark creativity.

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 1:

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 1 Step 1: Clarify why you want asset information Before you begin, clarify your goal for gathering information about community assets. State the goal specifically and translate it into questions that will uncover relevant assets.

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 2:

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 2 Step 2: Create initial list of assets Brainstorm! Simply write down as many ideas as possible – go for quantity rather than quality as you start out. Then expand your list by doing some research into existing resources: Phone directories, list of businesses from chamber of commerce, newsletters by local organizations, back issues of newspapers, libraries/librarians, etc. Use a spreadsheet and create categories

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 3:

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 3 Step 3: Decide how to collect more detailed asset information Asset inventories can take you beyond the basic information you gathered in the previous step Before you write up the questions to include in your asset inventory, think about how you will persuade people to complete it. Always consider the culture and the capacity of the people involved in this

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 4:

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 4 Design your asset inventory and use it Every asset inventory has three sections Introduction Survey questions Follow-up

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 4:

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 4 Introduction Who is conducting the inventory Purpose of the survey How the information will be used Survey questions Be clear Be easy to understand and answer Provide easy-to-use information Follow-up How to get involved Contact information Thank

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 5:

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 5 Map the assets you discovered Here the word map refers to any visual device for representing the information you’ve collected in the previous steps Design your map in any way that presents your key data at a glance – charts or diagrams, tables, etc.

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 6:

Steps involved in Tool 1: Step 6 Put your asset map to use Take the information you gain from asset mapping and find ways for community members to access and use it

Tools for Framing Ideas:

Tools for Framing Ideas Part Two – Tool 2: Analyzing Community Problems

Tool 2: Analyzing Community Problems:

Tool 2: Analyzing Community Problems About this tool: The way a problems is defined determines the type of solutions that will be developed Problems usually have more than one cause The process of analyzing community problems runs against the tendency to think of solutions first Equating problems and solutions Thinking in terms of solutions at the outset often prevents individuals and groups form identifying multiple causes of the problem and tends to limit creative thinking about alternate ways to solve a problem Rushing to action This often happens in community groups as people want to take action before making an assessment

Steps involved in Tool 2: Steps 1 and 2:

Steps involved in Tool 2: Steps 1 and 2 State the problem as you see it now What is the problem as you see it now? Have an effective discussion Describe why this is a problem Why is this a problem? Help the group analyze why a particular situation keeps the community from being the kind of community they want to be

Steps involved in Tool 2: Steps 3 and 4:

Steps involved in Tool 2: Steps 3 and 4 Describe the causes and consequences of the problem What are the causes and consequences of the problem This helps the group get a sense of the problems complexity Describe who is involved Who is involved This step encourages group members to make their responses as specific as possible.

Steps involved in Tool 2: Steps 5 and 6:

Steps involved in Tool 2: Steps 5 and 6 Identify information that you are missing What other information do we need? Define the problem in one sentence During this step, there is a difference between describing and defining it. Defining means focusing on some aspect of that situation that you can and will take meaning action to change

Tools for Framing Ideas:

Tools for Framing Ideas Part Two – Tool 3: Accessing Community Data

Tool 3: Accessing Community Data:

Tool 3: Accessing Community Data About this tool: You can access two basic types of data Primary information Which you gather directly from various stakeholders and other community members Secondary information This is usually given in numbers that describe current situations and future trends The data “measures” community conditions such as population changes, unemployment rates, etc.

Steps involved in Tool 3: Steps 1 and 2:

Steps involved in Tool 3: Steps 1 and 2 Step 1: Deciding what you’re looking for You can access community data from a variety of sources, such as going online, visiting a library, calling a local agency Step 2: Start locally Depending upon what it is that you are involved with, local sources such as data collected from particular organizations in your area that are involved with your issue

Steps involved in Tool 3: Step 3:

Steps involved in Tool 3: Step 3 Expand your search After accessing local resources, you can go beyond to include local, state and national levels. You can access this with online resources as outlined in your text

Steps involved in Tool 3: Step4:

Steps involved in Tool 3: Step4 Determine what the data means What type of information have you gathered? What is covered and not covered by the data? How do the facts connect? What is the context? Insider reactions Outsider reactions

Steps involved in Tool 3: Step 5:

Steps involved in Tool 3: Step 5 Follow up on your research Put your key findings in writing and present them Plan for future research

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