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How can I use the segments?: 

How can I use the segments? How to interpret the segments and its practical uses within decision making, investment and delivery

How can I use these segments?: contents page : 

How can I use these segments?: contents page Where to start: exploring segmentation in more depth Segmentation: knowledge to delivery Developing sport and active recreation Marketing sport and active recreation How to use the segments – practical examples Action Planning, Strategic development and targeted investment Project development Funding decisions Planning new facilities Catchment area analysis (facilities and existing programmes) Evaluation of projects Membership profile Attracting new members Identifying partners Marketing

Where to start: exploring segmentation in more depth: 

Where to start: exploring segmentation in more depth The next six slides show how users can explore market segmentation in more depth and start to think about implications for investment and delivery. The first task should be to look at the segment breakdown in your area. For County Sport Partnerships (CSPs), Local Authorities and regions this is available for free on the Sport England website - www.sportengland.org/reserach. If your area is not covered, please contact Laura Clayton (contact details on last slide). The segment profile will give you an overview of the segments in your area and your potential customers. In total there are nineteen segments. You will probably not want to look at all in depth or indeed target them all. The next few slides give some pointers on how you can start to break down your profile and explore which segments to look at in more depth. A local authority profile

Where to start: exploring segmentation in more depth: 

Where to start: exploring segmentation in more depth The following bullet points outline how to start exploring segmentation and ideas on how to prioritise which segments to target. You could consider the following: Which segments are the largest in your area? Which segments are proportionally larger compared to the national, regional or sub- regional proportion for that segment? Explore Active People data through Active People Diagnostic. Which groups have low participation? Match the demographics of these groups to the segment descriptions. Think about inequality, which segments have the lowest percentage of people taking part 3x30? Which segments contain higher proportions of priority groups?

Where to start: exploring segmentation in more depth: 

Where to start: exploring segmentation in more depth You may also want to take the following factors: Who are your possible partners? For example if you have a potential health partner you may want to look at the health data provided in the index table to identify which segments the health sector would also be interested in working with. Be realistic – take into account the facilities and programmes that are already in place / will be in place. Which segments are more likely to use these? Explore the segment profiles at smaller geographies. Look at the Sport England small area estimates map (http://www.sportengland.org/index/get_resources/research/active_people.htm). Which middle super output areas (MSOAs) have estimated lower participation rates? Ask your Sport England Performance Analyst to produce the segment breakdown for you in these areas and prioritise this area. Is there a particular geographical community you want to work with? For example, areas of high deprivation? Performance Analysts can produce segment profiles for specific areas.

Segmentation: Knowledge to Delivery : 

Segmentation: Knowledge to Delivery What consequences do the segments have for planning, delivery and investment? How can the knowledge provided by the segments contribute towards the development of more effective programmes and projects? The following four slides outline why the market segmentation is an important tool in raising participation and shows how this knowledge can be used in the decision making process. This information can be divided into two main areas: Developing the sporting and active recreation offer Marketing sport and active recreation The information used in these four slides is all available in the pen portraits. These are free to download from www.sportengland.org/research.

Developing the sport and active recreation offer: 

Developing the sport and active recreation offer Sporting and active recreation behaviour What sports are the segments more likely to play? The pen portraits give you information on which sports and active recreation the segments play and therefore the sports more likely to appeal to them. It is important to remember that the sports on the pen portraits are not the only sports that these segments take part in. The sport segment Powerpoint Presentation and index tables on www.sportengland.org/research give you more information on sporting behaviour. Motivation for taking part What are the differing motivations for taking part in sport? How can programmes be developed around these? For example Brenda takes part in sport to lose weight – would programmes with specific and measured weight loss goals motivate her to take part? Handy Hint Projects are more likely to be successful if they take into account the preferred sports and barriers and motivations. For example Paula likes to go swimming but child care is an issue. Could a swimming programme be developed which allows Paula to go swimming while her children are looked after by another project?

Developing the sport and active recreation offer: 

Developing the sport and active recreation offer Barriers to taking part What are the barriers to doing more sport? How can programmes overcome these? For example poor transport is a barrier to Elsie and Arnold doing more sport. Could free buses increase participation amongst Elsie and Arnolds? The sporting venue Are they likely to be a member of a health and fitness club? Would they prefer a competitive environment or do they want to learn a new skill. The pen portraits provide this knowledge. For example the London region recognised that Leanne and Chloes like to go to the gym and are working with the Fitness Industry Association to get more of this segment into health and fitness centres. Handy Hint Remember to take into account the facilities and projects you already have in place. In one of the case studies there was already a weight management class for the 50+ with a body mass index (BMI) of 30+. The project team were going to contact the organisers to critique the class to ensure that it was marketed and appealed to the Brendas, a segment they identified would be interested in these classes. You can also map facilities against particular segments. For example Kevs like to play football; – are there enough pitches near high concentrations of Kevs? Are Kevs being well catered for? Can projects be developed around these existing facilities which will appeal to Kev?

Developing the sport and active recreation offer: 

Developing the sport and active recreation offer Where will you find the segments outside the sporting and active recreation arena? For most people sport and active recreation take up a very small amount of their lives. It is important to explore where else you can find people and the other activities they are involved in. For example Norma likes to play bingo – would promoting sport and active recreation at these venues help increase participation? Or could they be a possible partner? You could also think about other activities Norma is likely to do which are like Bingo – e.g. would Normas also be likely to be members of the Women’s Institute. What other cultural activities are they involved in? Many segments have higher participation levels in arts than sport and active recreation. What is it about participation in the arts that attracts them more than sport and active recreation? For example many of the female segments take part in art to accompany children, yet this is a less important reason for sport and active recreation provision. Is there anything we can learn from the arts sector in terms of the family offer?

Marketing Sport and Active Recreation: 

Marketing Sport and Active Recreation The pen portraits provide knowledge on how to communicate with different audiences, presenting information on the medium, tone and style. The Medium The segments provide information on media consumption, including information on which segments are more likely to read local newspapers and listen to local radio. For example Norma is likely to read local newspapers, therefore in targeting this segment the East Riding of Yorkshire CSN is going to produce some feature articles aimed at Norma through the East Riding News. Tone and Message The pen portraits provide knowledge on the forms and style of communication that are more likely to be effective with the different segments. For example, Elsie and Arnold would respond to a friendly, comforting message based around traditional concepts and the concept of community. North Lincolnshire CSN are developing new marketing material that takes into account these factors. Handy Hint Look at the brands included in the pen portraits. These are the brands that the segment relate to and consume. Have a look at some of these brand websites. What are their values and attitudes? How do they communicate with their customers? What can you learn from this?

Delving below the pen portraits: further information on the sporting segments: 

Delving below the pen portraits: further information on the sporting segments The pen portraits provide the “essence” of each of the nineteen segments. They do not contain all the information that we have on the segments. This knowledge is provided in the index tables. These are available to download from www.sportengland/research/understandingparticipation/marketsegmentation The index tables include information on the following: Demographics Sports and active recreation behaviour Barriers and motivations for sporting behaviour Social capital Health and fitness Media consumption Financial indicators

How to use the segments : 

How to use the segments The next nine slides provide some practical examples on how the sporting segments are a useful tool in the decision making process, investment and delivery. The market segmentation case studies, available to download from the Sport England website provide real life examples and supplement this presentation. The presentation on “Taking forward market segmentation” available from www.sportengland.org/research/ outlines how local market segment data can be provided to underpin all of these tasks. Alternatively please contact your Sport England regional office who are able to provide additional support or information. These requests will be aligned to the regions local priorities.

How to use the Segments : 

How to use the Segments Action planning, strategic development and targeted investment Developing new strategies is the perfect time to explore the market segments. A local area segmentation profile gives you a thorough understanding of who your customers are and what they may want in terms of sport and active recreation provision. Once you have your market segmentation area profile, you may decide to develop your strategy around specific segments or on smaller geographic areas. Combining this with data from Active People provides a strong evidence base for local strategic decision making. Building on the action planning and strategic development, market segmentation can provide a useful tool when making investment decisions. The first task would be to establish how many people in the potential catchment are in any particular segment and the consequences this has for any targeted increased in participation. Further questions you may want to ask include which segments will provide the greatest opportunity to increase participation and why? How likely are these segments to do sport and active recreation or want to do more? Where are they geographically based within your area? What do they want in terms of sport and active recreation provision?

How to use the segments : 

How to use the segments Project Development Market segmentation provides an understanding of who your potential participants are and the kinds of projects which are more or less likely to succeed in raising participation. Your participant segment profile is an important source of knowledge when assessing whether a project will appeal to potential participants, whether it will motivate them to do more sport or if it helps break down the barriers to them doing more sport.

How to use the segments : 

How to use the segments Funding decisions The segment profiles are an important tool to consult when deciding whether a project proposal is more or less likely to be successful in raising participation. By exploring the profile of potential project participants and then looking at the relevant pen portraits; segmentation can contribute towards the assessment of whether a project will appeal to potential participants, it will motivate them to do more sport or if it helps break down the barriers to doing more sport. An understanding of all of these factors will contribute towards the opportunities to increase participation.

How to use the segments : 

How to use the segments Planning new facilities Market segmentation can provide additional customer insight when planning new facilities and could be viewed as a supplement to Active Places and Active Places Power (Sport England’s planning toolkit (www.activeplacespower.com). A local area market segmentation profile around any new proposed facility can provide information on what sports and active recreation participants may want to take part in. Carrying out market segmentation might also be particularly useful in growth areas, where the population is predicted to grow and change.

How to use the segments : 

How to use the segments 5. Catchment area analysis Through the geographic capability of the market segments it is possible to produce catchment area analysis around projects and facilities. This is available in a number of ways, in miles from the facility/project or by analysing smaller specific geographic areas. The example opposite is the drive time area produced for a proposed new leisure centre in East London. The market segmentation catchment area analysis can help you identify who your customers are and what thy are likely to demand and need in terms of sport and active recreation provision. It will also identify barriers to sport and possible communication strategies. This could lead to changes in facility programming, customer offers and marketing campaigns

How to use the segments : 

How to use the segments 6. Project evaluation Profiling participants by segments is an effective way to measure the types of people projects are attracting and assess whether this matches with the type of participants the project initially planned to target. Using postcode and demographic data from participants registration forms, we can match up project participants to sporting segments. The example opposite is the participant profile for users of the Wellness on Wheels project, compared to the local profile in Wear Valley. Comparing the participant profile to the local profile allows us to gain an understanding of whether a project is attracting a wide range of people within a community or is more attractive to specific groups. It is possible to analyse whether a project is meeting the needs of its customers or whether it should be altered to better fit the type of participants it is attracting.

How to use the segments: 

How to use the segments 7. Attracting new customers An understanding of existing members can help you become more effective in targeting new members. You are more likely to attract people with the same segment profile of your existing customers than to attract those with very different sporting segment profiles. This should be taken into account when developing new marketing material. Targeting other geographic areas where there is a significant number of people with the same sporting segments is also more likely to be successful than one than targeting areas without taking into account the sporting segment profile.

How to use the segments: 

How to use the segments 8. Identify potential partners While the main focus for the segments is sport and active recreation, they also contain knowledge on other factors and shared priorities such as health, obesity, social capital and arts participation. The index tables are the main source for this information. This knowledge can be used to identify segments different partners would be interested in working with, alongside Sport England.

How to use the segments: 

How to use the segments 9. Marketing The sporting segments provide a wealth of knowledge on how to communicate effectively with our target participants. This includes information on the mediums they are most likely to respond to, the type of message and how participants make decisions. The segment data at postcode level can be used to identify addresses for a direct marketing campaign.

Gaining access to the data underpinning these tasks: 

Gaining access to the data underpinning these tasks The presentation “Taking forward your segmentation profile” is available from www.sportengland.org/research/understandingparticipation/marketsegmentation outlines what market segment data can be provided to underpin all these tasks. To gain access to the raw market segmentation data (available at postcode, LSOA, MSOA and Local authority) please contact Mark Critchley mark.critchley@sportengland.org Each Sport England regional office has staff trained to produce market segmentation information in more complex ways than the information available on the web. Over time, we will build a significant body of knowledge and ensure the wide use of this data.  In the short term, the availability of this information will be aligned to regional priorities.  Contact details for each regional office are as follows: South East – Helen Price helen.price@sportengland.org South West – Matt Roebuck matt.roebuck@sportengland.org London – Stuart Mackie stuart.mackie@sportengland.org East – Libby Jones and Carolyn Benjamin libby.jones@sportengland.org carolyn.benjamin@sportengland.org East Midlands – Tricia Quinn Tricia.quinn@sportengland.org West Midlands – Rachel O’Reily rachel.o’reily@sportengland.org Yorkshire and Humber – Paul Neilson paul.neilson@sportengland.org North East – Sharon Carroll sharon.carroll@sportengland.org North West – Alex Bielecki – alex.bielecki@sportengland.org National and general enquiries laura.clayton@sportengland.org GIS enquiries mark.critchley@sportengland.org

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