Body language & winning techniques

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

PowerPoint Presentation:

BODY LANGUAGE

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Silent Language of Success: Your words are just the beginning- effective communication includes Eye contact, Hand gestures, and Movement. Did you know that 55% of communication is visual (body language, eye contact) and 38% is vocal (pitch, speed, volume, tone of voice)? That means only 7% involves your actual words. And when the spotlight is on you- whether one-on-one in an interview or when making a presentation to a large group—you need to communicate effectively on all levels. Here's a look at common body language mistakes, and winning techniques for avoiding.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Eyes: Common mistake: Taking your eyes off of listeners. Do you read directly from a PowerPoint presentation instead of addressing the audience? In a one-on-one conversation, do you glance to the side, down at your feet, or at the desk? Ever catch yourself looking over the shoulder of the person you're talking to?

PowerPoint Presentation:

Eyes: The winning technique: Keeping your eyes on your audience. If you're giving a presentation, commit your material to memory so you can connect instead of read. In small groups or meetings, maintain eye contact equally with everyone in the room. During one-on-one conversations, keep your eyes on the person you are speaking to 80% to 90% of the time.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Blocking: Common mistake: Putting something between you and your listener (s). Crossing your arms, standing behind a podium, standing behind a chair, and talking to someone from behind a computer monitor are all examples of blocking.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Blocking: The winning technique: Staying “open.” Keep your hands apart and your palms up, pointed toward the ceiling. Remove physical barriers between you and your listeners.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Hands: Common mistake: Not using them. Keeping your hands in your pockets or clasped together makes you seem stiff, stilted, and formal. It conveys insecurity, whether or not you're insecure.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Hands: The winning technique: Using complex hand gestures. Engaging both hands above the waist is an example of a complex hand gesture that reflects complex thinking and gives the listener confidence in the speaker. Just watch such charismatic speakers as Bill Clinton, Colin Powell, Barack Obama, or Tony Blair.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Animation: Common mistake: Standing or sitting perfectly still. Ineffective speakers barely move, staying in one spot during a presentation.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Animation: The winning technique: Animate your body, not your slides. Great speakers get up and move, and when appropriate, mingle with the audience, like Cisco Chief Executive John Chambers, who often walks into the audience as he speaks.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Posture: Common mistake: Slouching, leaning back, or being hunched over. Poor posture is often associated with a lack of confidence and can reflect—or be presumed to reflect—a lack of engagement or interest.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Posture: The winning technique: Keeping your head up and back straight. Also, lean forward when seated. By sitting toward the front of your chair and leaning forward slightly, you will look far more interested, engaged, and enthusiastic.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Thank You

authorStream Live Help