Home Medicine Cabinet

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Slide 1:

Prospective Survey Report on Assessment and Education of Home Medicine Cabinet in Community DEEPIKA GUPTA M. Pharma (Pharmacognosy) Ram-Eesh Institute of Vocational &Technical Education Greater Noida

Survey Team Members:

Survey Team Members Jyoti Arora Mr. Niyaz Alam Dr. Mohd. Shuaib Dr. U. K. Bajaj Mr. Alok Bhardwaj Deepika Gupta Swati Srivastava Ruby Verma Rahul Kaushik Bhawana Nishad Sristi Verma Shivani Tanwar Anuj Narang Rashmi Bharti Princima Gupta Rashmi Yadav Suman Kannaujia

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HOME MEDICINE CABINET

INTRODUCTION :

INTRODUCTION Medicine cabinet is defined as a cabinet that hold medicines and toiletries. Location : Away from sunlight Away from humidity NOT in reach of children NOT in kitchen NOT in store room

Basic Things Stored in HMC :

Basic Things S tored in HMC Pain relievers Ipecac syrup Antacid Anti-diarrhea medication Petroleum jelly Laxative Salt Thermometer First -aid kit

Directions for Keeping Medicines in Home Medicine Cabinet :

Directions for Keeping Medicines in Home Medicine Cabinet Always follow the directions on information leaflet Always keep medicines out of sight and reach of children Regularly check the expiry dates Unlabeled medications or any drugs without clearly printed indications and instructions for use should be discarded.

Pharmacist role for safe medication use in the home :

Pharmacist role for safe medication use in the home Ask patients to bring all medications to a medication assessment point. Counsel the patients for proper storage of medicines. Ask about old and out-dated medications that the patient may have at home and encourage their return to the pharmacy for safe disposal. Pharmacists should make sure that patients get the safest and most effective medications.

Directions for Giving Medicines to Children:

Directions for Giving Medicines to Children Only give your child medicine that was suggested by a doctor or pharmacist. Keep your medicine in the bottle that the medicine came in. Use right amount of medicine. Keep a list of the medicine your child is taking. Read the labels on the medicine to understand.

Routine Inspection and Disposal of Medicines:

Routine Inspection and Disposal of Medicines Tablets that have changed smell Tablets that are chipped , cracked or discolored Liquids that have thickened or discolored Capsules that have softened , cracked, or stuck together Ointments that have changed odor , hardened Any liquid that needed refrigeration that has been kept for more than two weeks

OBJECTIVES :

OBJECTIVES To assess and educate about Home Medicine Cabinet. To carry out the survey for proper and safe use of medications.

Rationale of the Survey :

Rationale of the Survey Medicine utilization studies are powerful exploratory tools to ascertain the role of medicines in society. Appropriate management of the family medicine cabinet for its effective use at the time of minor accident or illness and proper utilization of medicines .

METHODOLOGY :

METHODOLOGY Study Site The study was carried out in selected areas of Greater Noida City . Study Period Study was carried out for a period of one month. Study Criteria Houses storing drugs . Patient Data C ollection Form Questionnaire for assessing about Home Medicine Cabinet.

Observations and Results :

Observations and Results A total of 100 people were surveyed in 45 houses

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Gender No. Of patients Male 52 Female 37 Children 11 Gender wise distribution of the total population (n=100)

Education background distribution of interviewee from the total population :

Education background distribution of interviewee from the total population Education Number of Person Percentage Up to 10 th std. 59 59% Intermediate(10=2) 37 37% Graduation 4 4%

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Education background distribution of interviewee from the total population

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Category Number of houses Percentage Having home medicine cabinets 37 82.2% Not having home medicine cabinets 8 17.7% Number of houses with home medicine cabinets

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Category Number of houses Percen tage Having medicines 19 36.5 Not having medicines 30 57.6 Could not be surveyed 3 5.70 Number of houses having medicines in home

Number of Houses involved in self-medication :

Number of Houses involved in self-medication

Number of Houses involved in sharing/exchanging the medicines (n=5):

Number of Houses involved in sharing/exchanging the medicines (n=5) 1.9 0.9 0.9 0.9

Number of houses using medicines other than allopathic drugs:

Number of houses using medicines other than allopathic drugs Number of Houses Percentage Use non-allopathic medicines Homeopathy Ayurvedic Unani Any other system 18 4 9 3 2 40 22.2 50 16.6 11.1 Use only allopathic medicines 27 60

No. of houses using medicines other than Allopathic Drugs:

No. of houses using medicines other than Allopathic Drugs

Medicine Within Reach of Children :

Medicine Within Reach of Children

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Category Number of houses Percentage Checking for expiry drugs 11 57.8% Not checking for expiry drugs 8 42.1% 8 11 Number of house Members Checking Expiry Drugs

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Category of expired drugs

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Number of Houses cleaning/refilling Home Medicine Cabinets

PEOPLE STORING DRUGS AT PLACES OTHER THAN HMC :

PEOPLE STORING DRUGS AT PLACES OTHER THAN HMC

CONCLUSION :

CONCLUSION Medicines were placed in various unlikely places like, among vegetable basket, on the table, along with detergents, under the beds or inside pillow covers. Educational survey programmes are essential.

PROFORMA FOR COLLECTION OF DATA   :

PROFORMA FOR COLLECTION OF DATA Name& Address: _________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ Date: Time: In Out: Male: Female: Children: Gender of the interviewer: Male/Female Occupation: Education qualification of the interviewer: Graduation 10+2 up to X th std. QUESTIONAIRES Do you have medicines in your home? Yes No If yes, do you check for expiry date before medicine is being consumed? Yes No If No, on what basis do you consume the drugs and how do you discard off? color of the medication had changed and was discarded change in the taste and spilled the medicine unwrapped medication thrown in the dustbin Flushed the old medicines in the toilet Do you have medicine(s) cabinet in your house? Yes No If No, where do you keep these medicines? Kitchen bedroom cupboard any other place

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Are you taking self medication? Yes No If yes, Whenever I feel / occasionally Do you exchange or share the medicines? Yes No If yes, Among family members/ friends/ relatives/ neighbors Are you taking medicines other than allopathic system? Yes No If yes, Homeopathy 2) Ayurvedic 3) Unani 4) Any other system Are you cleaning your medicine cabinet? Yes No How often, Weekly/monthly/quarterly/half yearly/ yearly The available medicines/ medicine cabinets are within the reach of children? Yes No Details of the available medicines.

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Sl.No. Name Of The Drug Quantity Formula tions MRP Exp.Date Rx/Self Remarks To Whom The Drug Was Prescribed

References :

References Francis S.V. Tourinho. Fabio Bucaretchi,. Celso Stephan. Ricardo Cordeiro. Home medicine chests and their relationship with self-medication in children and adolescents. J Pediatr (Rio J).2008; 84(5):416-22. Tam Vuong, Jennifer L. Marriot. Unnecessary medicines stored in homes of patients at risk of medication misadventure. Journal of Pharmacy practice and research.2006; 36(1): 16-20. Simi Anie Sunny. B.G. Nagavi. Pharmacist’s role in OTC medication dispensing. The Indian journal of hospital pharmacy; Jan-Feb’2006: 16-18.

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M.A. Yousif. In-Home drug storage and utilization habits: a Sudanese study. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal. March 2002; 8(2&3):1-8. Eman A. Abahussain. Douglas E.Ball. Wandikayi C. Matowe. Practice and opinion towards disposal of unused medication in Kuwait. Med Princ Pract 2006;15:352-57. John P. Santell, Diane Cousins . Preventing Medication Errors that Occur in the Home. U.S.Pharm. 2004; 9:64-68.