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2005 Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios MCAS Alternate Assessment Massachusetts Department Education

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     The Massachusetts Department of Education, an Affirmative Action employer, is committed to ensuring that all of its programs and facilities are accessible to all members of the public. We do not discriminate on the basis of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex, or sexual orientation.   Copyright © 2005 Massachusetts Department of Education Permission is hereby granted to copy any or all parts of this document for non-commercial educational purposes. Please credit the 'Massachusetts Department of Education.'   This document is printed on recycled paper.   350 Main Street Malden, Massachusetts 02148-5023 (781) 338-3000 mcas@doe.mass.edu www.doe.mass.edu/mcas Massachusetts Department of Education   This document was prepared by the Massachusetts Department of Education. Dr. David P. Driscoll, Commissioner of Education

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Commissioner’s Foreword Dear Educators: I am pleased to present these 2005 Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios for the MCAS Alternate Assessment. This publication will be used to train qualified individuals selected by the Department to score student portfolios submitted for the 2005 MCAS-Alt. Information in this manual will assist scorers in using the scoring rubric so we can be confident that all portfolios are scored accurately and fairly. Students with significant disabilities who are unable to take MCAS tests, even with accommodations, must participate in MCAS by submitting an alternate assessment portfolio. It is important to include these students in MCAS to measure their performance in relation to the state’s learning standards, to improve their instruction, and to demonstrate that their educational needs matter. Thank you for taking part in this important component of MCAS. David P. Driscoll Commissioner of Education

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Table of Contents 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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General Guidelines Be objective and impartial. Try not to let personal feelings influence your scoring. Put aside your opinions about whether you feel the student’s placement, program, services, or participation in alternate assessment are appropriate. Score only what you see in the portfolio. Do not make inferences or assumptions about what the student or teacher may have intended. Use actual evidence, rather than the work description, as the basis for determining the score.   Avoid biasing your scores due to any of the following conditions: neatness of student (or teacher) work overall presentation and organization of the portfolio handwritten versus typed products 'electronic' versus 'paper' portfolios black-and-white versus color quality of photos or videotapes (provided all images are recognizable and well-labeled)   Score each strand separately in each rubric area. Do not let a score in one rubric area influence scoring in another area. Do not raise the student’s score in one area to 'overcome' or compensate for a lower score in another, or lower a score across several rubric areas without first examining all of the evidence.    Respect student and teacher confidentiality. Do not use the names of teachers or students when discussing the contents of any portfolio. Do not score any portfolio if you are familiar with the student or teacher who submitted it. Do not review or consider any IEP information provided in the portfolio. Respect the contents of the portfolio. Maintain the order of the contents in the portfolio. Keep all food and drinks away from the portfolio. The portfolio must be returned in the same condition in which it was submitted. Do not rush through scoring, but do not spend too much time reviewing evidence either. Ask for assistance if you are 'stuck.' Under normal circumstances, the review of an entire content area (generally, three strands) should not exceed one hour. Complete forms neatly and legibly. It is important to print neatly and clearly on all score forms, particularly those being returned to teachers. You will be asked to recopy any forms with information that is crossed out or illegible. 3 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios Thank you for your interest in scoring MCAS Alternate Assessment portfolios. Please read these scoring guidelines carefully. You must review each step of the scoring process, including all scoring rules, and the appendix. The following are general guidelines for scoring.

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English Language Arts (ELA)   Curriculum Framework Strand: learning standards organized around a subdomain, central idea, concept, or theme in the content area Strand 1 Language   Strand 2 Reading andamp; Literature Strand 3 Composition (NOTE: the Media Strand is not assessed by MCAS-Alt) Strand 1 Number Sense andamp; Operations   Strand 2 Patterns, Relations, andamp; Algebra Strand 3 Geometry   Strand 4 Measurement   Strand 5 Data Analysis, Statistics, andamp; Probability   Strand 1 Earth andamp; Space Science   Strand 2 Life Science Strand 3 Physical Science   Strand 4 Technology/Engineering       Mathematics       Curriculum Framework   Science andamp; Technology/ Engineering   Curriculum Framework Content Areas Assessed by MCAS-Alt 4 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios Content Areas Assessed at Each Grade by the 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment (choice of 3 strands) (choice of 3 strands)

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Required Portfolio Contents   Required Forms: 5 Three portfolio strands are required in each content area for all grades except Grade 3. Each strand must include at least one data chart and two pieces of primary evidence documenting performance of skills related to the same outcome or learning standard. Additional primary and secondary evidence may also be submitted, at the discretion of the teacher. See page 6 for an explanation of these terms. 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios If one of these forms is missing, scorers should provide a numbered comment on the Portfolio Feedback Form selected from the Comment Key. Required Contents of Each Strand: Data Chart Strand Cover Sheet Strand Cover Sheet Strand Cover Sheet STRAND 1 STRAND 2 STRAND 3 Data Chart Strand Cover Sheet Reading and Literature (Standards 4-17) 'Complete' Grade 3 Portfolio 'Complete' Content Area Portfolio Data Chart Data Chart Primary evidence of the same outcome as chart Primary evidence of the same outcome as chart Primary evidence of the same outcome as chart Primary evidence of the same outcome as chart Primary evidence of the same outcome as chart Primary evidence of the same outcome as chart Primary evidence of the same outcome as chart Primary evidence of the same outcome as chart

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Types of Evidence: Each portfolio strand will be scored separately. A strand may consist of any of the following portfolio products, some required and others optional, as described below: Allowable Portfolio Evidence Primary Evidence (required) - Clearly labeled products that document student learning directly, such as: instructional data field data charts bar graphs line graphs work samples video (3 minutes or less) photographs that clearly show a work sample, or the end product of instruction audiotapes that depict an oral presentation or performance Secondary Evidence (optional) - Products that support primary evidence or describe the context in which learning occurred, such as: photographs that show setting, learning context, materials, assistive technology, etc. brief notes or narrative descriptions by the teacher, peer, parent, or others assisting the student audiotapes reflection sheets or other self-evaluation activity (goal setting, task analysis, student charting own performance, self-correction) letters or notes of support from peers, employers, other teachers aids and supports used by the student visual aids graphic organizers templates (for example, those used with assistive technology) adapted tools or materials NOTE: Secondary Evidence will contribute to scores for Self-Evaluation and Generalized Performance, but do not affect the overall Performance Level. 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios 6 Labeling of primary evidence must include: Student’s Name Date (month/date/year) % Accuracy (number correct divided by the total) % Independence (or frequency of prompts provided)

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Summary of Scoring Process: Scorers Receives a portfolio from Table Leader Removes from unsealed white envelope Stores envelope under portfolio, or nearby Verifies all required forms were submitted NEATLY marks accordingly on Portfolio Feedback Form NEATLY records scorer ID, scorer number, and student information on Portfolio Feedback Form Reviews entire portfolio strand for completeness Records information about each piece of evidence on Strand Organizer 1 2 3 4 7 The Scorer: 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios Portfolio Feedback Form (see page 28) Strand Organizer (see page 27) Portfolio Feedback Form (see page 28)

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Summary of Scoring Process : Scorers Reviews Scoring Guidelines and determines the score in each strand for all rubric areas: Level of Complexity Demonstration of Skills and Concepts Independence Self-Evaluation Generalized Performance Using a pen, NEATLY places an X to indicate each content area and strand on the Portfolio Feedback Form, and writes the learning standard number(s) addressed in each strand Using a pen, NEATLY circles each score on the Portfolio Feedback Form. 8 The Scorer (continued) Adds numbered comments from Comment Key to Portfolio Feedback Form 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios 5 6 Using a #2 pencil, NEATLY transfers scores from the Portfolio Feedback Form to the top copy of the Student Score Form (green 'bubble' form) Removes top copy of Student Score Form Attaches it to top two copies of Portfolio Feedback Form with a paper clip 9 10 Portfolio Feedback Form (see page 28) Student Score Form (see page 29)

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Summary of Scoring Process: Scorers Places portfolio back in unsealed white envelope, and Returns the following materials to the Table Leader: Portfolio in unsealed white envelope Completed Student Score Form attached with paper clip to top two copies of the Portfolio Feedback Form Places bottom (third) page of the Portfolio Feedback Form facedown in the inside back cover of the student’s portfolio 11 12 9 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios The Scorer (continued)

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Summary of Scoring Process: Table Leaders 10 The Table Leader: Gives each scorer a portfolio to score Receives portfolios from scorers after scoring is completed Checks Portfolio Feedback Form for legibility and neatness (if not completed neatly, returns PFF to the scorer to complete a new form) 1 If no 'second read' is required, checks that forms are completed accurately, places portfolio back in carton, and holds the forms aside with all other forms  If 'second read' is required, gives portfolio to Scorer 2 and keeps forms from Scorer 1 separate  If portfolio is scored twice, checks for agreement between Scorers 1 and 2 Determines whether a 'second read' is required: For each scorer, every fifth portfolio is scored twice. When evidence is missing or insufficient in any strand (scored as 'M'), it must be scored again in that area by an 'M-Resolver.' Every Grade 10 portfolio is scored twice. 2 3 4 If scorers agree, places portfolio back in carton If scorers disagree, scores only the rubric areas in question, then places portfolio back in carton Records each scorer’s accuracy percentage on the Scorer Tracking Form When all portfolios in a carton have been scored: Checks that all Portfolio Feedback Forms are NEAT and LEGIBLE (if not, return to scorer) Bring carton to scanning room Retrieves new carton Distributes portfolios to scorers one at a time Repeats steps until all portfolios are scored 5 6 =  2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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Scoring: Level of Complexity Degree of difficulty of learning standards being addressed by the student Refer to Strand Cover Sheet (item numbers 4, 5, and 6). Use the Resource Guide to confirm that: Measurable outcome is linked to learning standard(s) for a student in this grade (if not, give Comment) Evidence addresses outcome listed on Strand Cover Sheet (Line 6) If outcome does not match the evidence, it may still be scorable if evidence is based on the learning standard itself Use the Scoring Rubric below to determine the score for Level of Complexity. Scoring Rules (A) Level of Complexity may vary within a single content area or strand. At least three pieces of evidence must be at the higher Level of Complexity in order to score at that level. Otherwise, score at the lower level in that strand (for example, two pieces of primary evidence showing entry points and one piece of primary evidence showing access skills scores a '2' for Level of Complexity). (B) 'Access skills' do not address curriculum content directly. They may be social, motor, or communication skills that allow a student to participate in a standards-based activity. Consult your Table Leader if uncertain. (C) 'Entry points' address curriculum directly, but below grade-level expectations. NOTE: An entry point in one subject (e.g., ELA: waiting one’s turn) may be an access skill in another subject (e.g., Math). (D) If you feel the standard is addressed at grade level, it should be set aside for review by scorers identified as content experts in that content area and grade level who will make the final determination. SCORING RUBRIC 11 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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Scoring: Demonstration of Skills andamp; Concepts Degree of accuracy in performing standards-based tasks or activities Confirm that the following, at minimum, are included in the strand being scored: one data chart (on at least 5 dates) two pieces of primary evidence that each address the same outcome (or learning standard) as on the data chart All pieces of primary evidence must be labeled with the following: 1. Student’s name 2. Date (mo/day/yr) 3. % Accuracy 4. % Independence Record % accuracy on Strand Organizer for each date within the final 1/3 timeframe. Calculate average percentage of accuracy for all evidence in the final 1/3 timeframe. Score = M in Demonstration of Skills and Concepts and Independence. Give a Comment If no If yes Use the Scoring Rubric below to determine the score for Demonstration of Skills and Concepts. Scoring Rules (A) A strand may also include additional pieces of primary evidence related to other outcomes and learning standards in the same strand. When this occurs, score as follows: First, determine whether the required minimum evidence is present (i.e., data chart and two pieces addressing the same outcome or learning standard). Then, record % accuracy on Strand Organizer for all points on the data chart in the final 1/3 timeframe, or the final three dates (if final 1/3 is fewer than three points). Then, record % accuracy for all other primary evidence in the strand, if within or after the same final 1/3 timeframe. Then, obtain an average percentage by totaling the % of all data points and evidence in the final 1/3 timeframe, and dividing the total by the number of data points and pieces of evidence. Include in your calculation only: primary evidence within, or after, final 1/3 timeframe, and primary evidence that has not already been counted on the data chart (i.e., do not count each point more than once). (B) If % accuracy is not provided on primary evidence, calculate it yourself if you can in two minutes or less (if not, score M). 12 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios SCORING RUBRIC Determine the final 1/3 timeframe for this strand (or last 3 dates, whichever is more).

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Scoring: Independence Degree of independence in performing standards-based tasks or activities Base the score for independence on the same data points and evidence as you used to calculate % accuracy. Record % independence on the Strand Organizer at the same time you record % accuracy. Calculate the average % independence for the evidence in the strand, as you did for accuracy. Use the Scoring Rubric to determine the score for independence. Scoring Rules (A) If score of M is given for Demonstration of Skills and Concepts, then a score of M must also be given for Independence; and vice versa. (B) If % cues/prompts are documented, rather than % independence; or if a ratio is provided (e.g., '6/7 independent'), convert to % independence using a calculator (e.g., 10% cues/prompts = 90% independence). (C) If % independence is not provided on primary evidence, you may calculate it yourself in two minutes or less (if not, score M). (D) In the score calculation, be sure to count each data point only once. For example, a work sample that is also included on the data chart is counted only once in the final tally. (E) Evidence that indicates that the student 'required assistance 30-40% of the time,' or 'was independent almost all of the time,' is unscorable. (F) Only count cues/prompts in the Independence score, not accommodations. 13 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios SCORING RUBRIC

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Calculating Accuracy and Independence Each of the three labeled pieces of primary evidence is scorable. (NOTE: Score M only when at least one labeled data chart and two labeled pieces of related primary evidence are NOT submitted.) 2. Record % accuracy and % independence on the Strand Organizer for all evidence within or after the final 1/3 timeframe (or last three dates) of data chart. In this strand, the final 1/3 timeframe begins on 2/28/05. 3. In the final calculation, do not include % accuracy and % independence from the same evidence twice. Since % accuracy and % independence for the work sample and video clip are already included on the data chart, do not include this information a second time. 4. Determine final scores using the Scoring Rubric. Demonstration of Skills = 4 Independence = 4 Scenario #1: Scoring Demonstration of Skills and Concepts (Accuracy) and Independence Portfolio evidence in this strand includes: one data chart one work sample one video clip Primary Evidence #1 Primary Evidence #2 (already charted) Feb. 28, 2005 Work Sample 80% Accuracy 100% Independence Primary Evidence #3 (already charted) % Accuracy (beginning 2/28/05) 80% 60% 100% avg. = 80% % Ind (beginning 2/28/05) 100% 100% 100% avg. = 100% 14 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios % Accuracy % Independence

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4/15/05 Work Sample 100% Accuracy 100% Independence Calculating Accuracy and Independence 1. Each of the three labeled pieces of primary evidence is scorable. (NOTE: Score M only when at least one labeled data chart and two labeled pieces of related primary evidence are NOT submitted.) 2. On the Strand Organizer, record % accuracy and % independence for all labeled evidence within or after the final 1/3 timeframe (or last three data points). In this strand, the final 1/3 timeframe begins on 2/28/05. 3. Record % accuracy and % independence for the two work samples since they are within, or after, the final 1/3 and are not already included on the data chart. 4. Determine final scores using the Scoring Rubric. Demonstration of Skills = 4 Independence = 4 % Accuracy (beginning 2/28/05) 80% 60% 100% 100% 100% avg. = 88% % Ind (beginning 2/28/05) 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% avg. = 100% Primary Evidence #2 (occurs within final 1/3 timeframe, not included on chart) 5/01/05 Work Sample 100% Accuracy 100% Independence Portfolio evidence in this strand includes: one data chart two work samples Primary Evidence #3 (occurs after final 1/3 timeframe, not included on chart) 15 Primary Evidence #1 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios % Accuracy % Independence Scenario #2: Scoring Demonstration of Skills and Concepts (Accuracy) and Independence

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9/20/04 Work Sample 40% Accuracy 100% Independence Calculating Accuracy and Independence 1. Each of the three labeled pieces of primary evidence is scorable. (NOTE: Score M only when one labeled data chart and two labeled pieces of related primary evidence are NOT submitted.) 2. Record % accuracy and % independence on the Strand Organizer for all evidence within or after the final 1/3 timeframe (or last three points) of data chart. In this strand, the final 1/3 begins on 2/28/05. 3. In the final tally, do not include the % accuracy and % independence from the two work samples, since they were completed prior to the final 1/3 timeframe (i.e., before 2/28/05). 4. Determine final scores using the Scoring Rubric. Demonstration of Skills = 3 Independence = 2 % Accuracy (beginning 2/28/05) 60% 40% 60% avg. = 53.3% % Indep (beginning 2/28/05) 20% 40% 40% a avg. = 33.3% Primary Evidence #2 (not within final 1/3 timeframe, and not included on chart) 12/2/04 Work Sample 60% Accuracy 40% Independence Portfolio Evidence in this strand includes: one data chart two work samples Primary Evidence #3 (not within final 1/3 timeframe and included on chart) 16 Primary Evidence #1 % Accuracy % Independence 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios Scenario #3: Scoring Demonstration of Skills and Concepts (Accuracy) and Independence

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Calculating Accuracy and Independence 1. Each of the three labeled pieces of primary evidence is scorable. (Rule: Bar or line graph summarizing a field data chart are both scorable). 2. Since the bar graph summarizes information on the field data chart, do not repeat % accuracy and % independence from the field data chart in the final tally. Similarly, since the related work sample is already included on the bar graph, do not repeat the percentages from that work sample in the final tally. 3. Record % accuracy and % independence for all evidence within or after the final 1/3 (or last three points) of data chart. In this strand, the final 1/3 timeframe begins on 12/3/04. 4. Determine final scores using the Scoring Rubric. Demonstration of Skills = 4 Independence = 3 % Accuracy (beginning 12/3/04) 100% 100% 100% avg. = 100% % Indep (beginning 12/3/04) 67% 50% 83% avg. = 66.67% Primary Evidence #2 (field data chart, used to create the bar graph) 12/2/04 Work Sample 100% Accuracy 50% Independence Portfolio Evidence in this strand includes: one bar graph one field data chart one work sample Primary Evidence #3 (related work sample, included on chart) 17 Primary evidence #1 (bar graph) % Accuracy % Independence 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios Scenario #4: Scoring Demonstration of Skills and Concepts (Accuracy) and Independence

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Calculating Accuracy and Independence Determine dates of the final 1/3 timeframe, which in this case, begins on 2/28/05.) 2. Determine whether at least two other pieces of primary evidence were submitted that show the same skill as the chart. If not, score M. 3. For evidence on or after 2/28/05, record % accuracy and % independence on the Strand Organizer for: data points work samples that show the same skill as the chart other work samples that show skills in other outcomes or learning standards in the strand 4. Do not record % accuracy or % independence for any work sample or data point prior to 2/28/05; or that is already included on the chart; or that is incorrectly labeled. 5. On Strand Organizer, record % accuracy and % independence for all scorable evidence within (or after) the final 1/3 timeframe. 6. Determine final scores using the Scoring Rubric. Demonstration of Skills = 3 Independence = 2 Primary Evidence #2 (same skill, but not charted) 2/15/05 Work sample 100% Accuracy 50% Independence Portfolio Evidence in this strand includes: one bar graph one field data chart four work samples (two show the same skill as the chart) Primary Evidence #4 (different learning standard in same strand) 18 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios 12/15/04 Work Sample 60% Accuracy 40% Independence Primary Evidence #1 % Accuracy % Independence 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Primary Evidence #3 (included on chart) 3/30/05 Work Sample 40% Accuracy 40% Independence Primary Evidence #5 (different learning standard in same strand) 3/1/05 Work Sample 80% Accuracy 100% Independence % Indep (beginning 2/28/05) 20% 40% 40% 100% avg. = 50% % Accuracy (beginning 2/28/05) 60% (2/28/05) 40% (3/30/05) 60% (4/29/05) 80% (3/1/05) avg. = 60% Scenario #5: Scoring Demonstration of Skills and Concepts (Accuracy) and Independence

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Scoring: Self-Evaluation Awareness of student’s own performance in the content area Scoring Rules Count as one example of self-evaluation each piece of evidence showing the following activities performed by the student: selecting work for portfolio choosing materials/activities reflecting on performance checking steps of an activity goal setting choosing workmates graphing own performance and/or correcting own work (B) Multiple examples of self-evaluation for a single piece of primary evidence = one example of self-evaluation. (C) If the student uses the same self- evaluation sheet for multiple pieces, count each one as an example of self-evaluation. (D) Self-evaluation does not include choosing a response to a question related to instruction. On the Strand Organizer, record the number of examples of self-evaluation in each strand and score according to the rubric: Number of Examples: Score is: 0 19 Record the score for each strand. 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios SCORING RUBRIC (for each strand in grades 4-10) M 1 1 2 or more 2+ SCORING RUBRIC (for Reading and Literature strand in grade 3)

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Scoring: Generalized Performance Number of contexts and instructional approaches used to demonstrate knowledge and skills. This includes the use of different media, materials, activity formats, presentation and response formats, and application of skill in home or community settings. Scoring Rules (A) Do not simply total the number of settings and/or people; instead, determine the total number of different ways in which the skill or knowledge was demonstrated. (B) If a student addresses the same skill in the same way, but with a different person in two different settings, GP = 1. (C) If the student uses a different approach in each of two settings, GP = 2. (D) Always count homework and work in a community setting as one additional context. (E) Examples of different contexts and instructional approaches: Age-Appropriate Materials: Lower the score by 1 point if materials used for instruction are not age-appropriate (e.g., use of dolls, cartoons, nursery rhymes, etc., by 16-year-old students). However, the score can never be lower than '1.' Add a comment from the Comment Key. Check with your Table Leader if you are uncertain. 20 Activity Score for GP 1 2 3 4 Complete a worksheet matching coin amounts to given values in the classroom; and complete a similar worksheet in the cafeteria. Complete a worksheet matching coin amounts to given values in the classroom; and make a purchase in the cafeteria. Complete a worksheet matching coin amounts to given values in the classroom; and make purchases in the cafeteria and in the community. Complete a worksheet matching coin amounts to given values in the classroom; create a work sample using a store flyer to make a purchase within a given budget; and make actual purchases in the cafeteria and in the community. 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios SCORING RUBRIC (for Reading and Literature strand in grade 3) On the Strand Organizer, record the number of contexts and approaches found in each strand. # of contexts or instructional approaches in this strand: Score is: 1 2 or more 1 2+ Record the score for each strand. SCORING RUBRIC (for each strand in grades 4-10)

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Scoring Rules in Special Cases Must all primary evidence be included on a data chart for it to be scorable? No. Work samples, videos, and other primary evidence may be included as data points on a graph or chart, but not necessarily. Regardless of whether primary evidence is also charted, it will be counted as primary evidence for the purpose of determining a score for the strand, provided that a minimum of two pieces of primary evidence are based on the outcome or learning standard described on the chart, . 2) What if fewer than three portfolio strands are submitted in a content area? Mark scores only in those strands that were submitted. If a student took a standard MCAS test in a subject required for assessment, do not mark any scores in that content area.   3) Are three strands required in a grade 3 alternate assessment? No. Scores for grade 3 alternate assessments are based on submission of only one portfolio strand. Do not score more than one strand, even if it is submitted. Grade 3 portfolios must assess the student’s knowledge and skills in one or more learning standards #4-17 in the English Language Arts Curriculum Framework. Learning standards #4-6 are part of the Language Strand, and learning standards #7-17 comprise the Reading and Literature Strand. These are the same standards on which the MCAS Grade 3 Reading Test is based. 4) What if multiple Strand Cover Sheets are submitted for a single strand? Scorers should 'bundle' all pieces of evidence in the same strand, regardless of the number of Strand Cover Sheets, and score each strand separately. Scorers must then determine whether a total of three portfolio strands were submitted, as required for each content area. If not, see the Rule #2 above.   5) What if no Strand Cover Sheets were submitted in the portfolio? If the scorer can ascertain the content area, strand, learning standard(s), and outcome assessed on all pieces of evidence, in less than five minutes, then the scorer can score the strand without a Strand Cover Sheet.   6) What if the portfolio contains cover sheets from previous years, or cites outdated versions of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks? If a portfolio contains outdated forms, it is still scorable using current scoring guidelines, provided all required evidence and information are provided.    If a Mathematics portfolio is based on the outdated (1996) Mathematics Curriculum Framework, and includes the Geometry and Measurement Strand, determine whether a sufficient amount of evidence is submitted in either Geometry or Measurement, then score either strand, or both, separately. If a Science andamp; Technology/Engineering portfolio includes the Inquiry Strand (from the outdated Framework), do not score it. If an ELA portfolio includes the Media Strand, do not score it. 21 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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7) What if a Grade 7 or 10 ELA Reading and Literature strand addresses standard #7 (Beginning Reading), which does not extend beyond Grade 4? What if standard #18 is included (dramatic reading/performance)? If a student’s grade 7 or 10 ELA Reading and Literature strand addresses standard #7, score it. If an ELA Reading and Literature strand addresses standard #18, score the strand and provide a comment. 8) When are photographs and audiotapes scorable? Photographs can be scored in the following situations, and ONLY when the subject is clear and the photo labeled with all required information (student’s name, date, % accuracy, % independence): A photograph may be scored as primary evidence when it shows a work sample that is either too large, fragile, temporary in nature, or unsafe to include in a portfolio. A photograph may be scored as primary evidence when it shows the end product of a sequence of steps (or each step in the process) performed by the student A photograph may be scored as secondary evidence when it shows the setting, instructional approach, or context in which an activity occurred (e.g., a student sitting at a computer) When audiotapes are clearly audible or transcribed in writing and labeled with all required information (student’s name, date, % accuracy, % independence), they are considered primary evidence in the following cases: When the outcome listed on the Strand Cover Sheet is related to communication; use of language; or participation by the student in discussion, recitation, performance, or other oral activity When the student provides only verbal, rather than written, responses as an accommodation. 9) Can evidence from the previous school year be scored in this year’s Science and Technology/Engineering Portfolio? Yes. A Science and Technology/Engineering portfolio at grades 5 and 8 may contain evidence accumulated over two consecutive school years (i.e., the current school year and one previous year). 22 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios Scoring Rules in Special Cases

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Additional Scenarios and Scoring Rules 23 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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24 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios Additional Scenarios and Scoring Rules (Cont’d)

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Grade 10, 11, and 12 Portfolios Every portfolio at grades 10, 11, and 12 must be scored twice, with all scoring discrepancies resolved by a Table Leader or M-Resolver. Scorers must set aside all portfolios in grades 10, 11, and 12 that score 4 or 5 in Level of Complexity in any strand. These must be reviewed by a panel of content experts in ELA and Math who will determine whether the body of evidence is comparable to the performance of a student who has 'passed' the grade 10 MCAS test with a score of 220. If you, as a scorer, are uncertain about the Level of Complexity but feel the work might be close to grade 10 level, then set aside the portfolio for review by the panel. The portfolio must contain evidence related to specific grade 10 learning standards in order for the student to earn the 'Competency Determination' (see pages 18-21 in the 2005 Educators’ Manual for MCAS-Alt ). Work samples in a 'competency' portfolio generally are accompanied by Grade 10 Work Description Labels, but will be considered for competency even if they do not have these labels. If a portfolio is being submitted with the intent of earning a Competency Determination, the Portfolio Cover Sheet will likely state at the bottom that the student has a 'unique and significant challenge' preventing him or her from taking the standard MCAS test. Strand Cover Sheets are likely to be checked off 'at grade level expectations,' rather than 'entry points' or 'access skills.' Score Level of Complexity as follows for Grades 10, 11, and 12 Portfolios: Level of Complexity = 5, when: the student is addressing standards at or close to grade-level expectations, AND all required evidence for a competency portfolio is submitted in the strand (see pages 18-21 of the Educators’ Manual for MCAS-Alt) Level of Complexity = 4, when: the student is addressing standards at or close to grade-level expectations, AND some required evidence for a competency portfolio is submitted in the strand Level of Complexity = 3, when: the student is addressing standards below grade-level expectations (i.e., 'entry points'), regardless of the amount of evidence submitted 25 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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Appendix: Score Forms - Summary The Scorer uses the following forms to record scores for all MCAS Alternate Assessment portfolios. Strand Organizer This form is used as a worksheet only, and will be discarded after scoring is complete. Scorers record information in the appropriate columns in order to keep track of all the evidence reviewed in each strand and to summarize important information as evidence is reviewed so it is not forgotten.   Portfolio Feedback Form (PFF) This form will be given back to teachers to provide them with direct feedback from a scorer who reviewed the portfolio. Scorers will summarize (in pen) the information from the Strand Organizers on this form and provide numbered comments from the Comment Key. There are three attached colored copies of each PFF. The top two will be collected by the Table Leader and clipped to the Student Score Form. The bottom copy will be returned in the portfolio, with the Comment Key printed on the reverse side.   Student Score Form (SSF) Final portfolio scores are recorded on this form by the scorer, then are electronically scanned into a database. Scorers will carefully separate the top copy of the SSF from the perforated packet found in each portfolio and, using a #2 pencil, transcribe information from the PFF onto this top copy. Comment Key The scorer selects appropriate comments from this numbered list of comments in order to provide feedback to the teacher(s) who prepared the portfolio. Place numbers in the appropriate boxes on the PFF. 26 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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Appendix: Score Forms - Strand Organizer 27 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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Appendix: Score Forms - Portfolio Feedback Form (PFF) 28 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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Appendix: Score Forms - Student Score Form (SSF) 29 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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Appendix: Score Forms - Comment Key 30 2005 MCAS Alternate Assessment: Guidelines for Scoring Student Portfolios

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