Development of achievement motivation & academic self-concept

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Development of achievement motivation & academic self-concept:

Development of achievement motivation & academic self-concept

Achievement motivation:

Achievement motivation A willingness to strive to succeed at challenging task and to meet high standard of accomplishments

Personal attributes to motivation:

Personal attributes to motivation Self-reliance Responsibility Willingness to work hard

Three phases of motivation:

Three phases of motivation By Deborah Stipek Phase 1 – Joy in Mastery Phase 2 - Approval Seeking Phase 3 – Use of Standards

Home influences on mastery/ achievement motivation:

Home influences on mastery/ achievement motivation The quality of child’s attachments The quality of home environment The child-rearing and achievement

Peer group influences:

Peer group influences Sometimes support and other times undermine parent’s effort to encourage academic achievements Academic Self-Concept also depend very heavily on children’s achievement attributions

Causes of failures and successes:

Causes of failures and successes Bernard Weiner (1974:1986) Stable Causes Ability (or the lack thereof) Effort Unstable Causes Task difficulty Luck (either good or bad) Mastery oriented children and adolescents attributes their successes to stable ( high ability ), their failures to unstable causes ( lack of effort )

Identity formation:

Identity formation

Identity:

Identity A mature self definition A sense of who one is Where is one going in life How one fits into society

Identity crisis:

Identity crisis Erik Erikson (1963) Term for the uncertainty and discomfort that adolescents experience when they become confused about their present and future roles in life

Identity status:

Identity status James Marcia (1980) Marcia developed a structured interview that allows researchers to classify adolescents based on whether or not they explored alternatives and made firm commitments There are four (4) identity statuses

Identity status:

Identity status Identity Diffusion Identity status characterizing individuals who are not questioning who they are and have not yet committed themselves to an identity

Identity status:

Identity status Foreclosure Identity status characterizing individuals who have prematurely committed themselves to occupations or ideologies without really thinking about these commitments

Identity status:

Identity status Moratorium Identity status characterizing individuals who are currently experiencing an identity crisis and are actively exploring occupational and ideological positions in which to invest themselves

Identity status:

Identity status Identity Achievement Identity status characterizing individuals who have carefully considered identity issues and have made firm commitments to an occupation and ideologies

Healthy identity outcomes:

Healthy identity outcomes A good identity outcome are fostered by: Cognitive development Warm, supportive parents who encourage individual self-expression A culture that permits and expects adolescents to find their own niches.

Knowing about others:

Knowing about others The other side of Social Cognition Children with ages below 7 or 8 describe friends using terms that they also use describe themselves There are three (3) phases to consider

Knowing about others:

Knowing about others Behavioral Comparisons Phase The tendency to form impressions of others by comparing and contrasting their overt behaviors

Knowing about others:

Knowing about others Psychological Constructs Phase Tendency to base one’s impressions of others on the stable traits that these individuals are presumed to have

Knowing about others:

Knowing about others Psychological Comparisons Phase Tendency to form impressions of others by comparing and contrasting these individuals on abstract psychological dimensions

End of presentation:

End of presentation

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