Supporting Refugees and Asylum Seekers in School

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Supporting Refugees and Asylum Seekers in School: 

Supporting Refugees and Asylum Seekers in School

Course Aims and Outcomes: 

Course Aims and Outcomes Delegates will gain skills in and understanding of Past experiences of refugees and asylum seekers Strategies to help pupils settle into school How to support pupils in the classroom How to counter racism and xenophobia

Programme: 

Programme 9.00am-10.45am. Definitions and statistics Differences between refugees and other pupils who have English as an additional language Why people leave their homes Implications for LEA, schools and teachers 11.00-12.00am. Preparing all pupils for life in a diverse society Racism in schools Discussion

Definition: Asylum Seekers: 

Definition: Asylum Seekers Asylum Seekers are people who flee their home country and seek refugee status in another, possibly because of war or human rights abuses, then lodge an application for asylum with that government.

Definition: Refugees: 

Definition: Refugees A person is recognised as a refugee when the Government decides they meet the definition of a refugee under the 1951 United nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and accepts that that person has a well founded fear of being persecuted.

Number of Asylum Seekers and Refugees in Portsmouth Schools by Age Group 31/3/04 and 20/9/04: 

Number of Asylum Seekers and Refugees in Portsmouth Schools by Age Group 31/3/04 and 20/9/04

Languages Spoken by Refugees in Portsmouth: 

Languages Spoken by Refugees in Portsmouth

Some Differences Between Refugee/Asylum Seekers and Other Pupils with English as an Additional Language (EAL) in Portsmouth Schools: 

Some Differences Between Refugee/Asylum Seekers and Other Pupils with English as an Additional Language (EAL) in Portsmouth Schools Refugee& Asylum Seekers are more likely to: Not know any other families of the same nationality/ language group in the area Have recently arrived in the UK and may never have been to school Be separated from some family members Live in poverty (Asylum seekers receive 70% of income support) Other pupils & families with EAL are more likely to: Be part of an established community Have been born and educated here Be part of a secure family unit Have parent(s) who work or receive full benefits

Slide9: 

Have multiple problems associated with trauma and the stress of uncertainty Have to accompany parents on home office visits and solicitors appointments Have to wait until a secondary school place becomes available Need assistance with finding a school place due to lack of support from the community Live in poor housing conditions including hostels Have been forced to leave their own countries Hope to return to their countries Have no background of persecution or war Have to translate at doctor etc if parents’ English is limited Will transfer to secondary school with peer group Have an understanding of the UK education system or gain support from the community Live in settled housing Have chosen to leave their country of origin Plan to stay in the UK long term

Why People Leave their Homes and come to The UK: 

Why People Leave their Homes and come to The UK Article 14 of the Universal Declaration of human rights establishes that everyone should have the right to seek and enjoy asylum. Important laws which enforce this right are: The Refugee convention (1951) The European Convention on Human Rights(ECHR) leading to the 1998 Human Rights Act The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child The UN Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment The UN Covenant on Civil and Political Rights The UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Implications for LEA: 

Implications for LEA Most families need: support finding school places and transfer procedures Free school meals and uniform grant Initial assessment/ early profiling Support from bilingual assistant and/or EMAS teacher Information about rights and responsibilities

Implications for schools: 

Implications for schools Arrange admission as soon as possible Establish special induction procedures Develop good relationships with parents/carers Place child in group/set according to cognitive ability not level of English Ensure Race Equality Policy acted on by all staff

Induction procedures: Initial Interview (H.T./Deputy, bilingual assistant, RAS co-ordinator EMAS/EWS) : 

Induction procedures: Initial Interview (H.T./Deputy, bilingual assistant, RAS co-ordinator EMAS/EWS) Find out as much as possible about the pupil (Previous education, strengths and weaknesses, standard of literacy in mother tongue, languages spoken, preferred name, name and ages of siblings, family circumstances) Pass information to relevant staff Discuss timetable and options (Secondary) Give welcome booklet containing information about the school in home language Fix starting date (consult with EMAS over availability of BA) Give information on school uniform and where it may be purchased Lend some items of second hand uniform if possible, for use until grant cheque can be issued and processed Complete all relevant forms including free school meals Show parents and pupil around the school and meet class teacher/form tutor

Induction Procedures: Preparation of Class/ Tutor Group (Class Teacher/Tutor and EMAS teacher /RAS Co-ordinator): 

Induction Procedures: Preparation of Class/ Tutor Group (Class Teacher/Tutor and EMAS teacher /RAS Co-ordinator) If possible place in class or tutor group with pupil who has the same language Ask pupils to empathise (‘what would it feel like in a new country where nobody spoke English?’ Ask for suggestions for making pupil feel welcome eg smile, be friendly, but don’t crowd round Discuss what to do if they hear anyone being unkind Find some words in the pupil’s home language to say and/or display Select 3-5 volunteers to be class friends/buddies, if possible one who shares the pupil’s first language

Induction Procedures: Briefing of Class Friends (Class teacher/tutor, EMAS teacher RAS co-ordinator): 

Induction Procedures: Briefing of Class Friends (Class teacher/tutor, EMAS teacher RAS co-ordinator) Look after her – you’re in charge for 2 weeks Greet her when she arrives each morning Make sure she always sits in a group or with a partner Introduce her to each new teacher at the beginning of the lesson and make sure the teacher can pronounce her name correctly Encourage her to join in with the lessons (watching, listening, joining in with activities). Try teaching her some new words but don’t expect a lot of talk. Ask her to teach you some words in her own language At break times show her around the school (including the toilets) Arrange for someone to have lunch with her In secondary schools make sure she doesn’t get lost between lessons – pass over to another class friend Work out between you how you will share your responsibilities and work out a rota Remember not to ‘baby’ her. You have your own work to do and she will learn by watching you and feeling involved

Induction Procedures: First day (Class friends, Bilingual assistant if available): 

Induction Procedures: First day (Class friends, Bilingual assistant if available) Class friends take to class room and introduce to tutor group First session with class friends and EMAS teacher or bilingual assistant Introduction and ice breaker Timetable filled in if appropriate ‘Fallback’ classwork explained in case ongoing work not appropriate. Pupil to record, in a bilingual journal, what she sees/understands during a lesson Class friends reminded of their duties Language assessment within first 2 weeks (EMAS teacher) Maths assessment within first 2 weeks EMAS teacher and head of maths) EMAS assessments and recommended strategies disseminated to appropriate teaching staff

Induction Procedures:Monitoring of programme (Class friends, EMAS teacher): 

Induction Procedures:Monitoring of programme (Class friends, EMAS teacher) First evaluation meeting(after one week): collaborative assessment of class friends’ performance and new pupil’s progress. Copy sent to tutor. New pupil sets own learning targets. Final evaluation meeting (after 2 weeks). Pupil’s skills and targets distributed to staff. (rolling programme; new targets follow new achievements) Accreditation Achievement certificate for new pupil Service certificates for class friends If new pupil very shy, new class friends may be allocated

Implications for Class and Subject Teachers: 

Implications for Class and Subject Teachers Say the pupil’s name correctly and make sure she knows yours Sit the pupil next to a supportive peer who can provide a strong model of English and behaviour Work in collaboration with the EMAS specialist teacher if possible Be sensitive if child is suffering from trauma and refer to outside agencies if necessary Make sure the child knows you value her home language and culture. Pupils should be encouraged to write in their own language if literate Use lots of visuals to support understanding (pictures, diagrams, mime, flash cards, videos, illustrated glossaries) Respect the ‘silent period’ Allow time to liaise with the bilingual assistant so that his/her time is used to best advantage Understand that there may not be a suitable place at home for the child to work

Pupils learn English from their peers and need access to the language of the curriculum. They should only be withdrawn from lessons for fixed periods of time if: : 

Pupils learn English from their peers and need access to the language of the curriculum. They should only be withdrawn from lessons for fixed periods of time if: They request help with particular GCSE course work or have specific problems, for example with tense forms They are having problems coping They have little or no previous schooling and lack literacy in their own language

To help make the literacy hour accessible, teachers should:: 

To help make the literacy hour accessible, teachers should: Involve EMAS staff in planning Choose text with clear print and illustrations Choose texts which are representative of all children’s backgrounds and experiences Use home language when introducing new words and texts (bilingual assistants or glossaries) Support new texts with visual aids and artefacts Provide lots of guided support by getting children to produce story boards for a particular texts and use writing frames Encourage parents to listen to children read new books Revisit texts in paired reading sessions, pairing bilingual children with fluent speakers of English Spend more time discussing the meaning of words, especially examples of idiomatic language Use sentence level work to develop pupils’ understanding of grammar, such as tenses and the use of prepositions Provide dual text books from the School Library Service

Strategies that may be useful in the Numeracy Hour: 

Strategies that may be useful in the Numeracy Hour Use visual clues such as flash cards to help learn new vocabulary Plan some questions that are specifically targeted at EAL learners new to English Get children to repeat answers to problems in sentences Start after school clubs where bilingual learners can consolidate their learning

Building Relationships with parents: 

Building Relationships with parents Issues to take into consideration when reviewing inclusive home school liaison policies: Parents who have recently arrived in the UK may be unfamiliar with the education system here, having come from countries where there is little parental participation in education or little education is available because of war or discrimination Past experiences in country of origin may make parents suspicious of authority and wary of contacts with schools Parents may speak little or no English

Inclusive Policies: 

Inclusive Policies Make all parents feel that they are wanted and have a positive role to play Show parents that they can always make their feelings and opinions known to staff and these will be dealt with respectfully and seriously Demonstrate that parents/carers’ linguistic, cultural and religious backgrounds are valued and respected Show that the school is part of the community it serves

Liaising with Parents: 

Liaising with Parents Many children come with only one parent, check who the child lives with before sending out letters Ensure that essential information is translated Use bilingual assistants for school admissions, assessments, SEN review meetings and parents meetings Prepare welcome booklets which explain about school procedures (available on disc from EMAS in a variety of languages) Model school letters eg for parents’ meetings, school trips etc, are also available in a variety of languages Organise social events such as coffee mornings for parents/carers who are new to the locality Invite parents/carers to help in the schools’ activities; many have highly developed skills and expertise

Preparing all pupils for Life in a Diverse Society: 

Preparing all pupils for Life in a Diverse Society Refugees Citizenship History RE English Geography Civil Rights The Holocaust Famous Refugees Welcoming in school Reasons for coming Media Bias Evacuation The Slave Trade The Trail of Tears Exploring immigration and emigration in the UK Population distribution and change Poetry and prose written by or about refugees Journeys across cultures Routes taken by refugees

Racism in Schools: 

Racism in Schools A racist incident is one that is perceived as such by the victim or a witness Many refugees in Portsmouth experience racist incidents in and out of school Many incidents go unreported for various reasons: Lack of English Not knowing who to tell Fear of authorities such as police Fear of repercussions from perpetrators Experience of no action being taken

Dealing with Racism in Schools: 

Dealing with Racism in Schools Have a clear policy that all pupils know and understand Have a named member of staff that pupils can go to to report incidents before and after school and during break and lunch time Make sure all pupils understand what the procedure is for reporting incidents Let the child know you are taking the incident very seriously and comfort him/her Impose set sanctions for offences, involving parents for second offences Involve the police if incident is violent Record all incidents in the racist log Never let a racist remark or action go unchallenged, no matter how trivial it may seem

authorStream Live Help