Mini Grant Web cast

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MINI-GRANT PROGRAM 2007WEBCAST TRAININGCINDY WILLEY: 

MINI-GRANT PROGRAM 2007 WEBCAST TRAINING CINDY WILLEY

Today’s Discussion: 

Today’s Discussion Section One – Making Friends With the Basics of Evaluation andamp; Research Section Two – Applying For and Using Grant Money Section Three – Project Ideas Section Four – Process andamp; Progress Section Five – Outputs andamp; What They Can Mean Beyond This Project

SECTION ONE: 

SECTION ONE MAKING FRIENDS WITH THE BASICS OF EVALUATION andamp; RESEARCH

What is the relationship between evaluation and quality of services?: 

What is the relationship between evaluation and quality of services? Improvement Recognition of satisfying, or exemplary, or shoddy service? Awareness of accountability

What do we learn from evaluation?: 

What do we learn from evaluation? What works or what doesn’t work Different perspectives Are we doing what we set out to do?

How do we understand the significance of evaluation and research?: 

How do we understand the significance of evaluation and research? Do a little homework Ask questions Consider what we have learned so far

How do we access research information in user-friendly format?: 

How do we access research information in user-friendly format? Ask for it Learn some basic concepts Believe that consumers/family members can make valuable contributions Participate

MORE BASICS OF RESEARCH & EVALUATION: 

MORE BASICS OF RESEARCH andamp; EVALUATION How do we know what we know?

PARTIAL TRUTH: 

PARTIAL TRUTH The types of questions you ask lead to the types of answers you get Information is always a social construction: contains partiality, bias, and stereotype This has a profound impact on what we study, how we study it, how we relate to participants, and what actions may result from the findings

A COLLISION OF VALUES: 

A COLLISION OF VALUES From the perspective of mental health professionals, mental illness means pathology Researchers observe level of function, recidivism, and symptom control Providers tend to look at the way the results of services affect the mental health system

COLLISION OF VALUES: 

COLLISION OF VALUES Often the same values appear as positive from one perspective and negative from another Consumers/family members judge the quality and appropriateness of services they receive by their impact on lived experience. We, as consumers/family members, ask 'What will this treatment or service do for my life?'

WHY INVOLVE CONSUMERS & FAMILIES?: 

WHY INVOLVE CONSUMERS andamp; FAMILIES? To empower us and… Minimize discrepancies Reduce risk of 'saying what interviewer wants to hear' Assess all important areas of interest Conduct respectful evaluations Share ownership of evaluations with the community

CONSUMER- & FAMILY-DIRECTED EVALUATION: 

CONSUMER- andamp; FAMILY-DIRECTED EVALUATION Grassroots account Bottom-up approach Participants as partners Confront issues of ownership andamp; control Evaluation story is told Personal impact is captured Knowledge exchange a key goal

Formulating Your Question: 

Formulating Your Question What is a high priority for our project? What do we know? What do we need to know? How do we report what we know? What answers are we expecting?

Who Will You Ask?: 

Who Will You Ask? How to identify 'stakeholders' Where to find people and information How wide to cast the net Which people have an answer?

What Methods Will You Use?: 

What Methods Will You Use? Written surveys Focus groups Interviews Administrative data collection and analysis Web-based instruments Direct observation

Expected Results: 

Expected Results Existing hypothesis? The 'real' picture Suggestions for improvement Better understanding of service or activity

Who Do You Tell?: 

Who Do You Tell? Reporting to funders Publishing to community Planners and Boards National publication Academia

SECTION TWO: 

SECTION TWO APPLYING FOR AND USING GRANT MONEY

Proposal Format Is Determined By Funder: 

Proposal Format Is Determined By Funder Following instructions is crucial. There are some accepted standards for grant-writing. Resources for understanding these: http://www.philanthropynw.org/grant/tips.htm  http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/shortcourse/index.html  http://www.leapfrogschoolhouse.com/do/findpage?pageKey=writing_tips  http://www.npguides.org/index.html

For This Project:: 

For This Project: We have attempted to keep things simple. For some of you, this may be your first proposal. We will discuss the format step by step, and you will have an opportunity to get help with specific questions. There is limited time today, but our technical assistance is ongoing throughout the project.

Proposal Format: 

Proposal Format COVER LETTER FACE PAGE ABSTRACT PROJECT NARRATIVE LETTER OF SUPPORT APPLICATION CHECKLIST

Exhibit 4. SAMPLE COVER LETTER FOR GRANT APPLICATION: 

Exhibit 4. SAMPLE COVER LETTER FOR GRANT APPLICATION Today’s Date WIMIRT-West Attention: Cindy Willey 9601 Steilacoom Blvd. SW Tacoma, WA 98498-7213 Dear Ms. Willey: Enclosed please find the original copy of our Consumer and Family Evaluation Mini-Grant Program proposal entitled, 'Call to Action: Evaluation of x-Town’s Pilot Support Line.' The primary purpose of this project is to train a five-member youth evaluation team to examine the extent to which this pilot support line has been implemented as it was originally intended. If you have any questions regarding this submission, please do not hesitate to contact me at 253-333-3333. Respectfully, Joan King Project Director enc.

Slide24: 


Exhibit 5. SAMPLE ABSTRACT : 

Exhibit 5. SAMPLE ABSTRACT

Project Narrative:: 

Project Narrative: The Project Narrative describes what you intend to do with your project and includes Sections A through D. Sections A through D of the Project Narrative should be no longer than 10 single-spaced pages. Members of the Review Committee will review Sections A - D to judge each application.

Slide27: 

A description of Sections A –D within the Project Narrative, as well as the percentage of points that will be given to these sections by the Mini-Grant Review Committee are included in the following slides.

Project Narrative – Section A (25%): 

Project Narrative – Section A (25%) The Background and Significance section describes why your project is important to the success of your organization and/or the particular program you are evaluating, how it promotes recovery, resiliency, and wellness, and how this project benefits your community. Information in this section should include: One to two sentences regarding what you propose to do in this project. Those who will benefit from this project, including who they are and how they will benefit. What is already known about the issue you will evaluate (background data, facts and figures, and any other information that is already known about the issue). How you/your organization decided this study was a priority and what, if anything, is currently being done about it.

Project Narrative - Section B: Proposed Approach and Timeline (40%) : 

Project Narrative - Section B: Proposed Approach and Timeline (40%) The Proposed Approach section provides a detailed description of how you plan to carry out the project, including: A description of the population that is the focus of the evaluation (for example, mental health consumers receiving Peer Support services or examination of services delivered within a Warm Line). If you are recruiting participants for this project, how people will be invited to participate, how they will be selected, and how many people will participate. Also specify how you will try to ensure that the people who participate are representative of particular groups within your community. How you plan to collect the information needed (for example, interviews, surveys, analyzing data in your agency’s current data system, focus groups, evaluation of policies).

SECTION B (continued): 

SECTION B (continued) Who will collect the information, how they will be trained to collect it systematically, how the data will be recorded, how the information will be kept confidential or stored. How you plan to analyze the information/data you collect. Provide a realistic time line for the project for May 1, 2007 – September 30, 2007, showing when tasks will be completed during the project.

SECTION B (continued): 

SECTION B (continued) Describe whether you plan to complete your final evaluation project by September 30, 2007. If your project will not be completed by September 30, 2007, describe how this portion of the project will help you to achieve the goals of the full evaluation project after September 30, 2007. Explain what will happen to the project following the grant period and what potential options exist to keep the project going after the grant period.

Project Narrative - Section C: Staff of the Evaluation Project (30%) : 

Project Narrative - Section C: Staff of the Evaluation Project (30%) Tell us about staff and/or volunteers who will work on this project, including: Project Director Assistant Director or Evaluation Team Any other staff assigned to the project, including outside consultants. Describe the experience of staff and/or volunteers (for example, experience working with veterans, stigma-busting, working with homeless individuals, serving special populations). If you have yet to hire staff or recruit volunteers, list the qualifications you will search for in prospective staff for your evaluation project. If an organization is the applicant, describe the organization’s mission, background, and qualifications for this evaluation project.

SECTION C (continued): 

SECTION C (continued) Describe any other individuals and/or organizations that will participate and their roles and responsibilities (This might be someone you ask for a 'Letter of Support' to include with your application.). Describe the resources available for the proposed project (for example, facilities, equipment, some one you might be able to work with at the community mental health center, such as an evaluator employed there).

Project Narrative - Section D: Budget and Budget Justification (5%): 

Project Narrative - Section D: Budget and Budget Justification (5%) The budget should include all expenses for completing your project within the funding period. Complete the Budget Form included at the front of this application packet. The Budget Justification provides a rationale for the items included in your proposed budget, as well as a description of any other existing resources or support you expect to receive for the proposed project.

Slide35: 

Exhibit 6. SAMPLE BUDGET Project Title: Assessment of Services Available for 18-21 Year Olds with Mental Illness in T-Town, WA

Slide36: 

Exhibit 7. SAMPLE BUDGET JUSTIFICATION Project Title: Assessment of Services Available for 18-21 Year Olds with Mental Illness in T-Town, WA The total costs of this five month project will be $5,935.00 Personnel: We will hire two co-directors at .20FTE for five months each to survey local agencies and organizations, examine the eligibility requirements that must be met to access adult mental health services, organize the case study of 30 16-18 year olds. Total costs = $4,000. Participant Incentives: We will give up to 30 staff who complete the surveys at $25 per survey. Total costs = $750. Copying: We will create and copy forms for the survey of organizations, forms for the extraction for the case study. We anticipate 200 copies at .05/copy. Total costs = $100.

Slide37: 

Supplies: For the duration of the project, we will establish a work area in an office that has been donated by the local XX church. We will furnish the office with a desk, two chairs, file cabinet and office supplies. We will obtain the furniture used for the anticipated costs of $300. Phone: To schedule interviews, we will need an office phone. We have budgeted $300 in set up costs and monthly phone charges. Mileage: The co-directors will travel by car to visit agencies and organizations throughout the community. They will be reimbursed for travel costs for 1,000 miles at $.485/mile for a total of $485. Exhibit 7. SAMPLE BUDGET JUSTIFICATION

LETTER OF SUPPORT: 

LETTER OF SUPPORT Include one Letter of Support for your project. A good letter of support will do most or all of the following: Confirm the letter writer’s commitment to the proposed project, either as a participant or as someone who will directly benefit from the project; Clearly explain the value, relevance and possible benefits of the work from the perspective of the letter writer; Describe the added value of your proposed project; and A Letter of Support should be individually tailored to the project.

CONSUMER AND FAMILY EVALUATION MINI-GRANT PROGRAMAPPLICATION CHECKLIST: 

CONSUMER AND FAMILY EVALUATION MINI-GRANT PROGRAM APPLICATION CHECKLIST Completed Mini-Grant Applications include all of the following items. To make sure you have included these items, go through your application and place an 'x' or check mark next to those items included in your Mini-Grant Application. Then provide your signature or initials (if submitted electronically), confirming that these items are all included within your application. □ Cover Letter □ Face Page □ Abstract □ Project Narrative □ Letter of Support □ Application Checklist (this form) Signature or Initials of Project Director:__________________________________________

SECTION THREE: 

SECTION THREE PROJECT IDEAS

SETTING GOALS: 

SETTING GOALS SPECIFIC MEASURABLE ACHIEVABLE REALISTIC TIME-DELINEATED

Give Yourself Permission to Brainstorm: 

Give Yourself Permission to Brainstorm CREATIVITY AND FLEXIBILITY Can Be Built Into Your Plan Remember That 'Non-traditional' Is the Standard Label for New Engage Your Stakeholders as Much as Possible

CONSIDER A PILOT STUDY: 

CONSIDER A PILOT STUDY A small first study using the same methods that a researcher wants to use for a larger study; the pilot study shows how well those methods will work.

IRB CONSIDERATIONS: 

IRB CONSIDERATIONS IRB = Institutional Review Board The group who looks at ethical standards of all research that involves studying people We will provide technical assistance to those of you who may require some type of IRB application and approval.

SECTION FOUR: 

SECTION FOUR PROCESS AND PROGRESS

DOCUMENT EVERYTHING!!!: 

DOCUMENT EVERYTHING!!! DOCUMENT EVERYTHING!!! DOCUMENT EVERYTHING!!! DOCUMENT EVERYTHING!!!

REMEMBER TO CLEARLY DEFINE PROJECT ROLES: 

REMEMBER TO CLEARLY DEFINE PROJECT ROLES WHO IS IN CHARGE OF WHAT? Project Leader can delegate to other staff and volunteers. Ask for outside support when needed. Use the Technical Assistance and other tools provided.

DOCUMENT PROCESS: 

DOCUMENT PROCESS Create a system of self-checking: Group dynamics Challenges faced Creative solutions used Structure of daily activities Working your plan Effects of project on those involved

DOCUMENT PROGRESS: 

DOCUMENT PROGRESS Build in project checkpoints: Phases or logical pieces (such as 'data collection complete' or 'new procedure designed') Consider weekly or biweekly progress reports Use internal memos to keep staff informed Use reporting forms that we provide for informing grant committee

REMEMBER TO HAVE FUN: 

REMEMBER TO HAVE FUN This can be a fun, exciting learning experience! You are finding e new way to make your voices heard! You are participating in a significant project recognized by the Governor’s office!

SECTION FIVE: 

SECTION FIVE OUTPUTS AND WHAT THEY CAN MEAN BEYOND THIS PROJECT

PIONEERS WHO HAVE PAVED THE WAY: 

PIONEERS WHO HAVE PAVED THE WAY AS EARLY AS THE LATE 70’S, MANY RESEARCHERS RECOGNIZED THE IMPORTANCE OF CONSUMER PARTICIPATION. IN THE LATE 80’S AND EARLY 90’S SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN EVALUATION AND RESEARCH BEGAN TO EMPHASIZE THE IMPORTANCE OF CONSUMERS/FAMILY MEMBERS BEING PART OF THE PROCESS.

FIRST STEPS: 

FIRST STEPS STATE PLANNING COUNCILS INCLUDE CONSUMERS AND FAMILIES CONSUMER/FAMILY REPRESENTATIVES JOIN MENTAL HEALTH BOARDS ANN LODER PRESENTS PLENARY 'HOPE WITH A CAPITAL H' AT NATIONAL MENTAL HEALTH STATISTICS CONFERENCE (1991) JEANNE DUMONT BECOMES FIRST CONSUMER MEMBER OF MHSIP AD HOC ADVISORY GROUP (1992)

MOVING FORWARD: 

MOVING FORWARD OFFICES OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS ARE ESTABLISHED ACROSS THE NATION THE CONSUMER/SURVIVOR MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH AND POLICY WORKGROUP IS FORMED (1991) THE MHSIP MENTAL HEALTH CONSUMER-ORIENTED REPORT CARD (1994-PRESENT) CONSUMERS AND MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS COLLABORATE TO PRODUCE AN OUTCOME TOOL GROUNDED IN CONSUMER VALUES

RECOGNITION: 

RECOGNITION EVALUATION AND RESEARCH BRING RECOGNITION TO YOUR PROGRAM/SERVICES

ACCOUNTABILITY: 

ACCOUNTABILITY EVALUATION AND RESEARCH CAN HELP BRING TO LIGHT OUR RESPONSIBILITY TO PROVIDE RECOVERY-ORIENTED SERVICES.

PROMISING PRACTICES: 

PROMISING PRACTICES EVALUATION AND RESEARCH CAN BE YOUR FIRST STEPS TO PROVING YOU HAVE A 'PROMISING PRACTICE', AND EVENTUALLY AN 'EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE'.

TEAM-BUILDING: 

TEAM-BUILDING PROJECTS OF THIS NATURE CAN PROMOTE A NATURAL PROCESS OF TEAM-BUILDING AND REMIND US OF THE 'MISSION'.

EXPAND OUR HORIZONS & OUR SKILLS SET: 

EXPAND OUR HORIZONS andamp; OUR SKILLS SET

FOR MORE INFORMATION: 

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT THE MENTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION PROJECT WEBSITE http://mhtransformation.wa.gov OR CALL OR EMAIL: MARIA MONROE-DEVITA mmdv@u.washington.edu 206-604-5669 CINDY WILLEY ckw4@u.washington.edu 206-393-2940

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