Cooper Geneology

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By: CaptFuzzy (57 month(s) ago)

Wow!!, seems like you and my buddy Ronnie may have some common ancestry there. That's right, I said my buddy Ronnie, I am a friend of his and this is his family lol, but I will pass the info on for ya if ya like.

By: bvillegal (48 month(s) ago)

I would like to get in touch with the persons who created the Cooper Genealogy. I believe that I am related to them through the Burks. Would like to share information. Lynn Andrews

 

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Cooper Genealogy : 

Cooper Genealogy Compiled by: Bonnie Lou (Cooper-Hager) Altizer & Aletha Louise (Cooper-Hager) Webb April 2009

Cooper Coat of Arms : 

Cooper Coat of Arms The Couper Coat of Arms On the right is an image of the Couper Coat of Arms as depicted on a Dutch tile. At the very top, you can see the Cooper's Hammer (a cooper is a person who makes wooden barrels) reflecting the name of the original John Couper, a Scottish Bishop who fled to Friesland in the late 1500's, adopting initially a Dutch version of his name (Jan Cuiper) and then later "latinising" his original name to Jan Janssen Couperus. This founded the Couperus family name just about the time that formal "Family Names" were becoming fashionable - later they were mandated by the government of the time. The hammer is accompanied by a pair of wings - indicating "flight" both in the sense of travelling through the air (see below about the Dove of Peace) as well as "fleeing". The cognate word in Dutch (vlucht) carries the same dual meaning - and this may well be a deliberate play on imagery and words, where the Cooper's Hammer has undergone a "flight" (i.e. fled, or "gevlogen/gevlucht" in Dutch). The hammer is mounted on top of the Knight's Helmet, indicating that the bearer carries the privileges of a knight (or "knecht" in Dutch - later this word changed its meaning in Dutch to where today it has a meaning closer to "apprentice".) Surrounding the the shield are the Bishop's robes - the color in this tile has changed over time - A Bishop's robes are supposed to be red with a golden lining, but this effect has clearly been lost in this tile. On the shield itself we see a dove of peace carrying an olive branch and flying towards the rising sun (i.e the East as we call it today - although now that maps are commonplace, we think of the East as being towards the right rather than the left on a map, with North at the top.) Why the East? Maybe it has no significance (the poor dove has to fly in some direction - or it could have religious connotations, or it could indicate passage from Scotland to Friesland.) Then finally we get the motto (or technically "the device" of the shield) which reads "Tuum Est". This may be literaly translated from the latin as "It is to you" or in Dutch "Het is aan jou". This could mean something like "It is up to you" if we were to express it in today's vernacular, or it could simply mean "This is yours". But the original design appears to consist of at least the cooper's hammer on the helmet together with the "flight" wings, the sun, and the dove with the olive branch - these themes are seen in all the embellished versions that appeared later in the 1700's. An interesting variant can be seen in the signet ring that Louis Couperus had made for himself.

History of Name of Cooper : 

History of Name of Cooper ORIGIN AND HISTORY The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller. The name derives from the Middle English “couper” meaning “a cask.” The wide spread adoption of this surname is testimony to the fact that Cooper was one of the valued specialist trades in the Middle Ages all through Europe

Flags of England : 

Flags of England Particularly there were four reasons that were behind the migration of settlers from England to America.  The first reason for their quest for religious freedom, something which was a rare, almost non-existent privilege back in England as all people had to belong to the Church of England.  Secondly English decided to move to America for the same reason that had motivated the Spanish conquistadors and the French, which was the desire for gold, wealth and other riches. Another reason that motivated many English people to come to America was the desire of having land ownership as according to the culture in England, only the eldest son was eligible for having land that too after the father's death so it was almost impossible to get a land in England.  Lastly, the menace of war served as a negative reinforcement for the English settlers who wanted to get away from the calamities that those wars brought to their lives in England Summarily, they came to America, during colonial times, because of poverty, famine, and the English Civil War. Some people went to the American colonies in search of better opportunities; some wanted adventure and some wanted to make a fresh start after disgracing themselves in England. So basically, settlers came to America because they wanted to start a new life. England to America Use: Civil and state flag Proportion: 3:5 Adopted: 16th century Design: A centered red cross on a white background 14th Century Royal Banner of England The English version of the First Union Flag, 1606, used mostly in England and, from 1707, the flag of the Kingdom of Great Britain. Used during the Revolutionary War.

Colonial Experiments, First English Settlements : 

Colonial Experiments, First English Settlements The Spanish, French, and Dutch wanted to find precious metals in the Americas, to trade with the indigenous peoples, and to convert them to Christianity. Their agricultural colonies in the Caribbean, Mexico, and South America were worked by African slaves and by unwilling native peoples, and relatively few Europeans settled permanently in those places. In contrast, England, a latecomer to New World colonization, sent more people to the Americas than other European nations—about 400,000 in the 17th century (1600’s)—and established more permanent agricultural colonies. English migrants came to America for two main reasons. The first reason was tied to the English Reformation. King Henry VIII broke with the Catholic Church in the 1530s. Through a series of political and religious twists and turns, the new Church of England developed a Protestant theology, but it retained much of Catholic liturgy and ritual forms. Within the Church of England, radical Protestants, later called Puritans, wanted to suppress the remaining Catholic forms. The fortunes of the Puritans depended on the religious preferences of English monarchs. Queen Mary I, who ruled from 1553 to 1558, was a committed Catholic who tried to roll back the tide of religious change; she executed hundreds of Protestants and chased many more into exile. Her successor, Elizabeth I, invited the exiles back and tried to resolve differences within the English church. The Stuart kings who followed her, James I and Charles I, again persecuted Puritans. As a result, Puritans became willing to immigrate to America. The second reason for English colonization was that land in England had become scarce. The population of England doubled from 1530 to 1680. In the same years, many of England’s largest landholders evicted tenants from their lands, fenced the lands, and raised sheep for the expanding wool trade. The result was a growing number of young, poor, underemployed, and often desperate English men and women. It was from their ranks that colonizers recruited most of the English population of the mainland colonies. Ships to Jamestown: Susan Constant, Godspeed & Discovery

Cooper Genealogy &Buffalo Ridge CherokeeA Remnant of a Great Nation Divided : 

Cooper Genealogy &Buffalo Ridge CherokeeA Remnant of a Great Nation Divided The Coopers married Cherokee Indian Maidens. The Cooper surname and surnames of the women they married are listed on the Cherokee Indian Tribal Surname list. The Cooper family passed down the tradition by mouth that they were Cherokee Indian. Their features are that of Cherokee Indians. Their ancestors were listed as Mulatto or Melungeon (which signified being an Indian) on the 1700 and 1800’s Virginia Property Tax lists. "Gathering The Lost American Indians Into One Tribal Membership Organization" The Seven Clans of the Cherokee Indians

Slide 7: 

Cherokee Indians in Ceremonial Dress

The Cherokee Indian People : 

The Cherokee Indian People HISTORY The word Cherokee is believed to have evolved from a Choctaw word meaning "Cave People." It was picked up and used by Europeans and eventually accepted and adopted by Cherokees in the form of Tsalagi or Jalagi. Traditionally, the people now known as Cherokee refer to themselves as aniyun-wiya, a name usually translated as "the Real People," sometimes "the Original People." Earliest historical data locates the Cherokees in a vast area of what is now the southeastern United States, with about 200 towns scattered throughout the present states of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. Cherokee oral tradition tells of a time when the Cherokees were ruled over by a powerful priesthood called the ani-Kutani. When the priests took away a young man's wife, he organized a revolt and all the priests were killed. Since then, according to the tale, the Cherokees have had a democratic government. Three events mark Cherokee history during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries: war with the colonists (beginning in 1711); epidemics of European disease (primarily smallpox); and the continual cession of land (beginning in 1775). The Cherokees were forced to sign one treaty after another with the new United States government, each one giving away more land to the new nation. As early as 1803, President Thomas Jefferson planned to move all eastern Indians to a location west of the Mississippi River, and signed an agreement with the state of Georgia promising to accomplish that deed as soon as possible. Andrew Jackson actually set the so-called "Removal Process" in motion. In the meantime the government had been doing everything in its power to convince Cherokees to move west voluntarily, and the first to do so were the faction known as Chickamaugans. Other migrations followed in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The vast majority of the Cherokees, however, remained in their ancestral homelands. In 1835 the United States Congress passed the Removal Act. The Cherokee Nation, by this time under the administration of Principal Chief John Ross, refused to recognize the validity or the legality of the Removal Act, and challenged it in court. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Cherokee Nation. President Jackson is reported to have said, "Justice Marshall has made his decision. Now let him enforce it." Jackson then sent negotiators into the Cherokee Nation to secure a treaty whereby they would give up all of their land in the east for land out west. Since the government of the Cherokee Nation refused to negotiate, other Cherokees signed the treaty without authorization. The United States called the treaty a legal document and proceeded to force the Cherokees to live up to its terms. Jackson ordered the U.S. Army to forcibly remove the Cherokees from their homelands in 1838. People were taken out of their homes and herded like cattle into stockades to await removal. Conditions were crowded and unsanitary, and many died in these prisons. The forced march began later that same year. Approximately 20,000 Cherokees were marched west over what would soon be known as the "Trail of Tears." Along the way, approximately 4,000 people died. A few managed to escape by hiding out in the mountains. The Cooper family was one of those who escaped into the mountains, kept quiet as to their Indian heritage in order to keep the government from realizing they were Indians and removing them from their land and sending them to Oklahoma... The Trail of Tears-Removal of the Cherokee Indians from Virginia

Surnames of the Lost Colony of Indians in Virginia-Monacan/Siouan/Saponi/Lumbees/Cherokee/Melungeons, etc. : 

Surnames of the Lost Colony of Indians in Virginia-Monacan/Siouan/Saponi/Lumbees/Cherokee/Melungeons, etc. Names used in the Lost Colony of Roanoke Project 1st section: Surname-Source Allen -- Colonist rosterAlligood -- Families of InterestArchard-- Colonist rosterArchard -- Families of InterestArmstrong -- Families of InterestArthur -- Colonist rosterAustin -- Families of InterestBailie -- Colonist rosterBarber, Barbour -- Families of InterestBarrow -- Families of InterestBeasley -- Families of InterestBennet -- Colonist rosterBennet -- Families of InterestBerde -- Colonist rosterBerry -- Families of InterestBerrye -- Colonist rosterBishop -- Colonist rosterBlount -- Families of InterestBorden -- Colonist rosterBoyd -- Families of InterestBragg -- Families of InterestBridger -- Colonist rosterBridger -- Families of InterestBright -- Colonist rosterBright -- Families of InterestBrooke -- Colonist rosterBrooks -- Families of Interest Browne -- Colonist rosterBryant -- Families of InterestBuck -- Families of InterestBurden -- Colonist rosterButler -- Colonist rosterButler -- Families of InterestCage -- Colonist rosterCahoon -- Families of InterestCain -- Families of InterestCarawan -- Families of InterestCaroon, Carron -- Families of InterestCarrow -- Families of InterestChapman -- Colonist rosterChapman -- Families of InterestChavis -- Families of InterestCherry -- Families of InterestCheven -- Colonist rosterCollins -- Families of InterestColman -- Colonist rosterCooper -- Colonist rosterCooper -- Families of InterestCotsmur -- Colonist rosterCox -- Families of InterestCrisp -- Families of InterestCroom -- Families of InterestCuttler -- Families of Interest…Pinn… Regardless of predominant phonotypical appearances, whether African, Indian, or Caucasian, these groups embrace their heritage and maintain their Indian identity in the face of skeptics and the recognition machine.

Cooper Pioneers Married Cherokee Indian Maidens : 

Cooper Pioneers Married Cherokee Indian Maidens White women were rare in the American Colonies and many Settlers Married Cherokee Indian Maidens. THE CHEROKEE WEDDING PRAYER Now you will feel no rain,For each of you will be shelter to the other.Now you will feel no cold,For each of you will be warmth to the other.Now you will feel no more loneliness,For each of you will be a constant companion to the other.Now you are two bodies,But there is only one life ahead of you.Go now to your dwelling place,To enter your days of togetherness. The population of white settlers slowly but steadily grew along the James River in the late 1700s. A great number of them were with various ethnic backgrounds. The largest population segment of settlers chiefly consisted of French-Canadian, English, and German fur traders. Many of them married Indian women and raised families of mixed-ancestry. Most of these traders were born as British subjects, and of the Roman Catholic faith. European and Native American Cultures Mingled. Europeans and Native Americans reached understandings of one another, often built upon fundamental misconceptions that it facilitated good relations and trade. Many trappers and traders married Indian women, beginning a pattern of cross-cultural kinship ties.

Buffalo Ridge Cherokee Indians of Amherst County, VA : 

These isolationist tactics cost them–Indian communities in Amherst were often poor and poorly educated–but they appear to have worked. It is worth noting that Amherst Indians who successfully held themselves aloof from “black contamination” regained tribal recognition in the 1980s. Another group, also living in Amherst County, which proudly claimed African, Native, and Caucasian ancestry–the Buffalo Ridge Cherokee–did not. The Cooper family and others not listed but are noted on the census records as mulatto people and marriage records show the family connection to the Buffalo Ridge Cherokee. Book: The Buffalo Ridge Cherokee by Horace Richard Rice page 97-99 states: A list has been compiled of the Old Cherokee Surnames on the Index and final rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Cherokee Tribe, in the Indian Territory on the 1835 Census Roll of the Cherokees East of the Mississippi, In Emmet’s Starr’s Old Cherokee Families- Old Families and Their Genealogy, in Bob Blankenship’s Cherokee Roots, in Jerry W. Jordan’s Cherokee by Blood, in Whitehead’s Article of 1896, and in James Tyner’s Those Who Cried. The list of names has been placed below in the left column and a list Of some common Cherokee surnames in Amherst County and vicinity (who have Cherokee ancestry/oral history and/or Cherokee surnames (right column). Cherokee Surnames Local Cherokee Surnames -------- -------- Bryant Bryant Campbell Campbell Cooper Cooper Cockrum Cockran, Cochrum Hicks, Hix Hicks, Hickey, Hix Murphy, Murphey Murphy Nelson Nelson Scott, Samuel Scott, Dick Scott Scott Smith Smith -------- -------- Buffalo Ridge Cherokee Indians of Amherst County, VA All of these are Indian Surnames and are surnames of women that the Coopers married into. Coopers were Indian. This is not an absolute fact that Coopers were Indians, but when oral history and details are consistent, it is extremely highly probable. There were very few white women to wed in the new colonies, but a lot of Cherokee Indians were already living here and the Coopers were Pioneers. Our Coopers were listed as future Mulattos on Virginia property tax lists. Appalachian Cherokee Indians

Cherokee Women in Amherst County Virginia : 

Cherokee Women in Amherst County Virginia Those white men who married Indian women were shocked to discover that the Cherokees did not consider them to be related to their own children, and that mothers, not fathers, had control over the children. Intermarriage with whites and blacks caused a drastic change in family structure for many Cherokees. The Cherokees have a matrilineal clan structure, a family in which descent is traced through the female line. This type of family structure was undermined by the insistence of white males to be considered heads of households, and to pass along their own surnames to their offspring. They were supported in this by the efforts of the missionaries.

Virginian Cherokee Indians Escaped to the Allegheny Mountains to Avoid the Trail of Tears : 

Virginian Cherokee Indians Escaped to the Allegheny Mountains to Avoid the Trail of Tears 1830's Cherokee Indian Dwelling Home. Several small bands of Cherokee Indians remained in the hills of Western Virginia when the Cherokee Nation was forced to move to Oklahoma in 1838. Several of these Indians intermarried with the Immigrants. The Cherokees' knew how to cultivate the "three sisters" (corn, beans, and squash); these crops were supplemented with hunting and the gathering of wild plants. These skills along with the skills of the Immigrants provided for a good life.

Appalachian Cherokee Indian’s Homesteads : 

Appalachian Cherokee Indian’s Homesteads Appalachian Cherokee Indian Family

Buffalo Ridge Cherokees : 

Buffalo Ridge Cherokees History Oral history that has been passed down from generation to generation states members of The United Cherokee Indian Tribe of Virginia, Inc. are of American Indian ancestry. As Cherokees from the Ridge in Amherst County and Stonewall Mill in Appomattox County united, they became known as The United Cherokee Indian Tribe of Virginia, Inc. Our Native American ancestors were survivors. They blended into the rural surrounding by becoming successful farmers, carpenters, military minutemen - Revolutionary War soldiers, skilled and semi - skilled professionals. They dressed like others so as not to draw undue attention. To some, they were " White "; to some they were Colored”. Very few were informed of their true identity, “Cherokee Indian.” In fact, the secret has been so well kept, that we now have to delve into numerous Court and vital statistic records, and archives to provide evidence of our ancestry. Like our ancestors, we are proud, hardworking, skilled professional citizens. The present descendants have generally continued those vocational trends. Today the community has Physicians, Nurses, Teachers, Pharmacists, Anesthesiologists, Building Contractors, Attorneys, and a host of other skilled and professional positions. Buffalo Ridge families realized there was a weakening of the tribal community. Family reunions and gatherings were not sufficient to pass on tribal beliefs and traditions. Therefore, a formal organization was formed to retain their cultural heritage. Since the inception of the United Cherokee Indian Tribe of Virginia, our members have increased their activates in the County community, with projects such as Adopt- a -Highway and providing representation on the Commonwealth of Virginia Workforce Investment Board. Our current membership is 534 strong. We are located in Madison Heights, Virginia, a municipality in Amherst County. Located between The City of Lynchburg, Virginia and the home of our former President Thomas Jefferson in Popular Forest, Virginia and the counties of Appomattox, Virginia {historically known as the area where General Lee surrender to General Grant, ending the Civil War.} Looking over the Ridge one is able to view the city of Bedford, Virginia where the newly erected National D-day Memorial is located. All locations previously mentioned are in the heart of Central Virginia. For more then 300 years, UCITOVA tribal community descendents are still living and are strong. In the past, history has shown we have been bullied, harassed and taken advantage of. Through these times, we have relied on the wisdom of our Elders to provide the correct course, to preserve our beliefs and history. This wisdom has enabled researchers and genealogists to understand the miraculous events that have occurred in the Great Cherokee Nation and our Tribe. Chief of Buffalo Ridge Cherokees Samuel H. Penn, Sr.

Slide 17: 

Original log cabin schoolhouse, built ca. 1870, used by Christian evangelists to minister to Monacan Indians; now a National Historic Landmark For more than 10,000 years, the Buffalo Ridge Cherokee people have lived in the Piedmont and mountain areas of Virginia and West Virginia. About 10,000 Indians, which were actually a confederacy composed of several major tribes, lived in the area around 1607 when John Smith and the colonists founded Jamestown. Group of students at the Indian Mission, Falling Rock. Group of Students Indian Mission, Falling Rock, Recess Time. Amherst Indian School and Mission: Falling Rock.

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Amherst Indian Settlement Group of students. Indian Mission School. For a neglected mountain district. Amherst County Typical Indian settlement home Scene of Indian Settlement Amherst County

Slide 19: 

The Spanish Pioneers in United States History: The Melungeons: The Pioneers of the Interior Southeastern U. S. 1526-1997 by Eloy Gallegos   Page 160, gives the following Lumbee surnames in his book : Allen, Bennett, Chapman, Chavis, Cloud, Cole, Coleman, Collier, Cooper, Dial, Gallagher, Graham, Howe, Hunt, Hyatt, Locklear, Lockiler, Lucas, Martin, Osborne, Osburn, Oxendine, Presley, Reeves, Revels, Roberson, Shepard, Stevens, Stewart, Tally, Taylor, Ware, Wheeler, Williamson, Willis, Wood, Wright. They originated from Roanoke Island/Albemarle Sound Area On the Virginia Coastline. The remnants of this mixed raced population were ultimately pushed together in the mountains of south-central Virginia, western North Carolina and upper South Carolina where they became known as the Tri-racial isolates. But some of the Indians avoided the "Trail of Tears" by escaping to the isolated high ridges of the Appalachian Mountains where their descendants remain to this day. The mystery of the Melungeons is like The gypsies, but not in roaming but in their predating of the Arrival of whites to this country, the forgotten colony After decades of searching for my vanished Indian heritage I am jubilant to announce that my quest has become a success and rewarding in many ways.

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees: Remnants of a Great Nation Divided“ Written by Dr. Horace Rice, PhD: Heritage Press : 

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees: Remnants of a Great Nation Divided“ Written by Dr. Horace Rice, PhD: Heritage Press This article touches on a topic that seems to be a sore point for manyAmericans. It is the topic of the relationship between Africans and NativeAmericans. Many of us who are researching run into walls which we cannot get past. In order to break down the wall we have to follow the trail, no matter where it goes. If you cannot find your ancestors listed as black you may need to be looking for them in the "Mulatto" or "Indian" category. I found myself stuck many times when looking for my ancestors under the black designation.I found out that some states had a "Black", "mulatto" and "White"designation. The "M" designation was used to designate Indians (or mixedrace). To anyone who has heard of the United States Colored Troops andbelieve that "colored" designated only blacks, that is incorrect. "Colored"was a term used to designate anyone who was not white. Many Native Americans participated in the Civil War on the Union side and they served in the United States Colored Troops. The key that I used to get past the block was to look for the name first then the racial designation. In fact the racialdesignation was the last information I looked for since many of my relativeslisted themselves as white. The information in this article should behelpful to those who run into walls. The article is about a Tribe in AmherstCounty who call themselves "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees".

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees” (continued) : 

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees” (continued) Cherokees In Amherst County Virginia: The Cherokee language belongs to the Iroquian linguistic group. It is believed that, during some prehistoric time period, they lived in the Great Lakes region. This belief is based on numerous generations of Delaware Indian historians who passed on the oral tradition of their ancestors to their descendants whenever they had the opportunity in the northern woodlands 1(Terrell, 1971, 131). The tradition states that the powerful Delaware, whose ancient homeland was in New Jersey, Eastern Pennsylvania, and New York, fought the Cherokees over a period of the reign of three Chieftains before the Delaware's could finally claim victory (p. 10). Amherst, Nelson, Rockbridge and Augusta County were thought to be hunting grounds for the Cherokee. Amherst County is located in Central Virginia along the Blue Ridge Mountains. "Amherst is the Genius of the Old Dominion, a living, real, everlasting representative of the State, to be seen and known of all men. Look at her, the great Giantess, sitting upon the highest portion of Central Virginia, with her back against the Blue Ridge, and her feet dabbling in the noble James (River). Mount Pleasant her head, lifted 4,090 feet in the air, the Tobacco Row her fruitful breast: The Ridge, her knees holding under them a wealth of minerals; the upper James her strong right arm,... 2"(Blankenship, R.B., 1907, 15).

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees” (continued) : 

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees” (continued) At one time in their exciting history, the Cherokee were a powerful and great Nation. They possessed 135,000 square miles of area that covered eight states: North Carolina, Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia (Blankenship, B., Cherokee Roots, 1978, 5). This tribe, one of the largest in the Southeastern section of the United States, was the first to adapt to the arrival and civilization of the Europeans. In 1540, when Hernando De Soto explored the area of the Cherokee, he discovered that they had an advanced society in their capital city, Echota (itsati), near the modern city of Madisonville, Tennessee (Yenne, 1986, 35). According to tradition, the Allegeni, the ancestors of the modern Cherokee, were defeated by the Delaware-Iroquois alliance and moved into Virginia. They settled in New Holston Valley after residing for a period of time at the Peaks of Otter in Bedford County (Johnson, 34). In just twenty years, from 1880 to 1900, the Indians in Amherst County were systematically erased from the record books by the stroke of a pen. They were forced by law in 1705 to be called "mulatto" and then called "black" in 1900. Many of the Cherokee descendants of Amherst County accepted this term without resistance. In fact, by 1850, as "Free Inhabitants" of Amherst County, the Cherokee families lived in the communities with blacks and whites and many of the families "went" for black or white, depending on the racial community in which they lived and felt secure ( p. 37).

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees” (continued) : 

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees” (continued) Some of the Cherokee residents in the Stapleton area "went for black" even though they knew that their major ancestry was Indian, Indian/white, Indian/black or Indian/white/black. The census enumerators classified some of them as black or colored, so many of them "went for black or colored." They attended the colored school, Fairmount, on Buffalo Ridge in the Stapleton area, even though a number of them were full, three-quarter, or half blood Cherokee. Directly across the James River, in the Stonewall Mill area of Appomattox, near Turner Mountain, however, some of their bi-racial or tri-racial Cherokee relatives went to school with children of white residents, even though they themselves chose to be considered as colored. "During the mid-1700's a band, or tribe of disenfranchised "Mulattos" began moving from the Eastern Shore of Virginia and headed for the Mountains (Matoe) of Central Virginia seeking a place where they could keep their culture alive. The band was composed of various racial groupings, Indian, Indian/black, Indian/white or Indian/white/black. The surnames included such names as Pinn, Beverly, Sizemore, Evans, Branham, Redcross, Hartless, Carter, Coleman, [Cooper], Johns, Harris and Sparrow. It is believed that this group was headed for the Mountains, a place where their ancestors often hunted Buffalo, they called their settlement "Buffalo Ridge". The Native Americans viewed the Buffalo as a spiritual animal, whose coat they wore in battle and whose meat sustained them. The group that settled on the Ridge served in the Revolutionary War as Patriots and eventually became wealthy land owners. They were not unlike the Creoles in Louisiana, as most had never been slaves (Wills, Anita).

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees” (continued) : 

Excerpts From "The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees” (continued) During the early to mid-1800's, the families started clustering together in geographical and/or religious groups. "Pinn Park", one of the first official church/tribal burial grounds in Amherst County, is believed to have been an interment site as far back as 1750 (Land Survey of Fairmount Baptist Church/ "Pinn Park Cherokee Grounds, Amherst County"). By the 1840s, Turner Pinn, Samuel Scott, Madison Beverly, Anthony Beverly, Bartlett Sparrow, Polly Beverly, George Jewell, and others were living in the same tribal setting (clustered together in a residential clan connection) and listed as "Free Colored" individuals (U.S. Census, Amherst County, 1840). It was only later that white settlers began to purchase land from these Native Americans and build dwellings between them. Census records show these families clustered together in 1840 and earlier. The later census records show a progressively larger number of non-family members settling in these previously "closed" areas. They were prosperous farmers on the Ridge..., (p 64). Contrary to the common belief that all Negroes and other free coloreds, or Indians, were slaves in Virginia prior to the end of the Civil War, there were in fact a large number of "Free Colored" inhabitants in Amherst County (McLeroy & McLeroy, 1977, 52). Free colored inhabitants comprised approximately two to three percent of the county's population between 1810 and 1860. It is believed that the major portion of these residents were, in fact, Native Americans. While some of the free colored persons were former or freed slaves, the other residents were Native Americans, descendants of full or mixed blood ancestors. The children of Native American mothers were born free while the children of slave and Native American fathers were not free because the children usually lived with their mothers. If their mothers were in included in the institution of slavery, they were born in bondage. This fact partly accounted for the large number of slaves that had Native American features. Remnants of this group still reside on the mountain today, although most leave for better opportunities. They are members of the Keetowah band of Cherokees who meet in Tennessee once a year. The Cherokees were able to prosper by keeping family ties strong. Within this band if you are a cousin, you are welcome, they believe that "Blood Is Thicker Then Water". The ties are now cultural as very few pure blood Native Americans are left. Some of the Ridge Natives attended Howard, Hampton and other of the "colored" schools in Virginia. Those who were educated did not forget those who stayed on the ridge. The Buffalo Ridge Cherokees do not deny that they are intermixed with blacks or whites, however, they are determined to keep their Indian heritage alive. Many still speak in the old language and pass it on to their children. They are a proud but friendly people- They are "The People Who Came Before Columbus". **These groups for what ever reason, stick in history and peoples minds. Somewhere along the line, people of mixed ancestry in the south knew they were Indian - but through generations had forgotten tribal names. Hence the Lumbee (Croatan, Cherokee of Robeson Co. etc), the Monacan , Buffalo Ridge Cherokee the Indians of Persons Co. (Cherokee of Person co.) Haliwa, Saponi (Halifax and Warreen Co.) etc.The names of Dominickers, brass ankles, redbones, Melungeon exist based on these tri-racial groups. Interesting enough, people ask their elders who are we? and they give the answer of Cherokee, Blackfeet, etc. because of oral tradition as recognizable Indianess.

Slide 25: 

Page 9 from a book: The Buffalo Ridge Cherokee A Remnant of a Great Nation Divided It says that the Cherokee Believed in Jesus Christ And judgment after death. During the French & Indian wars, The Cherokee fought on the side The English.

Slide 26: 

Page 120 from a book: The Buffalo Ridge Cherokee A Remnant of a Great Nation Divided It says that Coopers were a Buffalo Ridge Family and had a rich Cherokee heritage. Buffalo Ridge residents Have always been free Indian people.

Slide 27: 

Page 171 from a book: The Buffalo Ridge Cherokee A Remnant of a Great Nation Divided It says that the Cherokee Passed down verbally to their Children through the Generations that they were Cherokee, but told not to tell Anyone outside the family. They did not want to be taken Off their land and sent to Oklahoma.

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Essex and King and Queen: Nelson, Fortune, Byrd, Cooper, Tate, Hammond, Brooks, Boughton, Prince, Mitchell, Robinson. Local Registrars, Physicians, HealthOfficers, Nurses, School Superintendents,and Clerks of the CourtsDear Co-workers:Our December 1942 letter to local registrars, also mailed to the clerks, set forth the determined effort to escape from the negro race of groups of "free issues," or descendants of the "free mulattoes" of early days, so listed prior to1865 in the United States census and various types of State records, as distinguished from slave negroes Now that these people are playing up the advantages gained by being permitted to give "Indian" as the race of the child's parents on birth certificates, we see the great mistake made in not stopping earlier the organized propagation of this racial falsehood. They have been using the advantage thus gained as an aid to intermarriage into the white race and to attend white schools, andnow for some time they have been refusing to register with war draft boards as negroes, as required by the boards which are faithfully performing their duties. Three of these negroes from Caroline County were sentenced to prison on January 12in the United States Court at Richmond for refusing to obey the draft law unless permitted to classify themselves as "Indian."Some of these mongrels, finding that they have been able to sneak in their birth certificates unchallenged as Indians are now making a rush to register as white. Several clerks have likewise been actually granting them licensesto marry whites, or at least to marry amongst themselves as Indian or white. To aid all of you in determining just which are the mixed families, we have made a list of their surnames by counties and cities, as complete as possible at this time All certificates of these people showing "Indian" or "white" are now being rejected and returned to the physician or midwife, but local registrars hereafter must not permit them to pass their hands uncorrected or unchallenged and without a note of warning to us. One hundred and fifty thousand other mulattoes in Virginia are watching eagerly the attempt of their pseudo-Indian brethren, ready to follow in a rush when the first have made a break in the dike.Very truly yours,A Nansemond family, ca. 1900 W. A. Plecker, M.D.State Registrar of Vital Statistics SURNAMES, BY COUNTIES AND CITIES,OF MIXED NEGROID VIRGINIA FAMILIES STRIVING TO PASS AS "INDIAN" OR WHITE: Plecker

Battles in Red, Black, and WhiteVirginia's Racial Integrity Law of 1924 : : 

Battles in Red, Black, and WhiteVirginia's Racial Integrity Law of 1924 : A Nansemond family, ca. 1900 Walter Ashby Plecker was unassuming in appearance: a small-town doctor whose penchant for number-crunching earned him the position of registrar in Virginias Bureau of Vital Statistics in 1912. But appearances were indeed deceiving. With Plecker at the helm, the bureau went on an all-out war against "amalgamation". Plecker was not the author of the Racial Integrity Law of 1924--Virginia's infamous "one drop" statute, which created two racial categories, "pure" white and everybody else. But he--and allies such as John Powell of the Anglo-Saxon Clubs of America--pushed hard to enforce the act's provision for "ancestral registration". Virginians shied away from compliance in that area, according to J. David Smith in The Eugenic Assault on America: Scenes in Red, White, and Black. Indeed, "passing" might have been commonplace among whiter-skinned African- Americans since at least 1662, when the first anti-miscegenation laws were passed in Virginia, but even for allegedly "pure" whites, proof of racial purity might have been difficult to obtain. And at least one group of whites who had been proud of their so-called impurity lobbied successfully to have the act revised. The aristocratic descendants of Pocahontas-- resentful of being lumped in with "Negroes, Mongolians, American Indians, Malayans, or any mixtures thereof, or any other non-Caucasian strains"— twisted arms until the legislature decreed that persons with no more than one-sixteenth Native American ancestry might still be considered white. But Plecker's power to grant birth, death, and marriage certificates gave him unprecedented and awesome powers over Virginians who had less clout than the Pocahontas contingent. With the stroke of a pen, Plecker could write an individual into "Negro" status--and legal and social oblivion. Plecker was only too willing to exercise that power, thus making him a figure of dread to Indians in general, but particularly to the Powhatan remnants in Rockbridge and Amherst counties, until his retirement and subsequent death in 1946. According to Helen Rountree, a Old Dominion University professor who has written extensively on Virginia's Powhatan tribes, Plecker believed that all Indians had "polluted" their blood by mingling it with free African-Americans—or "free issues", in the local vernacular. Plecker thus saw those who claimed Indian ancestry as opportunists seeking what Rountree called a "way station to whiteness"-- in other words, he saw all Indians as blacks attempting to "pass." Plecker's beliefs placed him squarely in the mainstream of the American eugenics movement, which assaulted the rights of poor whites as vigorously as those of racial minorities. But the desire to make Native Americans simply "vanish," whether into the African-American population or into thin air, had much deeper roots.

Battles in Red, Black, and WhiteVirginia's Racial Integrity Law of 1924 continued: : 

Battles in Red, Black, and WhiteVirginia's Racial Integrity Law of 1924 continued: Peter Houck, author of Indian Island in Amherst County, cites Bacon's Rebellion in 1676 as the first sustained and coordinated effort in Virginia to drive the Powhatans from their land. But we cannot forget that the nation's Indian removal policy was formulated by that great defender of liberty Thomas Jefferson and carried out by that great defender of the common man Andrew Jackson. Indeed, long before Ulysses S. Grant had developed "vanishing" into an official "Peace Policy," Virginians had mastered the mechanics. "In time, you will be as we are," Jefferson promised in his 1809 Indian address. "You will become one people with us. Your blood will mix with ours; and will spread with ours over this great Island..." Absorption into the white race--a consummation devoutly to be wished from one perspective--was the lure Jefferson tossed before the tribes. As for those who "mingled their blood" with African-Americans, they, too, would be absorbed--though they might not like the consequences. Let us consider the example of the Gingashins. This eastern tribe had two strikes against it: Its members refused to give up their traditional lifeways; even worse, they intermarried freely and unashamedly with blacks. This was anathema to Virginia elites. Intermarriage with whites could be, and was, tolerated. Intermarriage with blacks, however, was an intolerable challenge to the arbitrary color line that had been in place since the first chattel slavery law passed in 1661. Thus, in 1813, the Gingashins made their way into the history books, becoming the first U.S. tribe to be terminated. Needless to say, Gingashin identity did not die with the legal decree. As late as 1855, Rountree notes, county maps showed an "Indian Town," an Indiantown Creek, and a settlement of seven houses. Eventually, however, white antagonism, not to mention opportunism, forced the Gingashins to merge into a sympathetic African-American community. Tribes such as the Pamunkeys, Mattaponis, Upper Mattaponis, Nansemonds, Rappahannocks, and Chickahominies took note of the lesson--and learned how to resist. A century later, armed with the awesome power of the state, Plecker declared war on these people. Consulting a listing of surnames associated with Native American ancestry-- such as Beverly (from beaver), Sparrow, Penn or Pinn, Fields, Bear, and so on--and drawing his authority from century-old census records that were likely to list Indians as "mulattoes"-- particularly if the census were taken in summertime, Houck notes-- Plecker embarked on a crusade to re-classify every Native American in the state as an African-American. Plecker intimidated mid-wives, wrote threatening pamphlets, editorialized in newspapers, and trained an entire generation of county clerks and health service workers in his methods. When all else failed, he simply changed records to suit his prejudices, striking out the designation "Indian" and replacing it with "Negro" or "colored" or "mulatto"--or writing notations on the back. But while Powhatans suffered under Plecker's tyranny, they refused to vanish. When necessary, they sacrificed both family ties and good will in the African-American community by refusing to attend Jim Crow schools or segregated churches. These isolationist tactics cost them--Indian communities in Amherst were often poor and poorly educated--but they appear to have worked. It is worth noting that Amherst Indians (Monacan) who successfully held themselves aloof from "black contamination" regained tribal recognition in the 1980s. Another group, also living in Amherst County, which proudly claimed African, Native, and Caucasian ancestry--the Buffalo Ridge Cherokee--did not.

Counties that formed from VA Counties : 

Counties that formed from VA Counties Elizabeth City was originally named Kikotan (also spelled Kecoughtan and Kikowtan), presumably a word for the natives who were living there when the English arrived in 1607. These natives were recent immigrants themselves, settling the peninsula after Powhatan defeated and expelled the previous occupants. New Kent 1654 Formed from York County. Records burned 1865, during Civil War. King and Queen 1691 Formed from New Kent County. Most records destroyed 1864 in the Civil War. King William 1702 Formed from King and Queen County. Records destroyed by fire in 1885. Essex 1692 Formed from Old "Rappahannoc" County. Tappahannock, VA 22560. Spotsylvania 1721 Formed from Essex, King William, and King & Queen Counties. Goochland County was formed in 1728 from the western portion of Henrico County (original shire) includes all or part of the present counties of Amherst, Appomattox, Albemarle, Bedford, Buckingham, Campbell, Cumberland, Fluvanna, Nelson, and Powhatan Orange 1734 Formed from Spotsylvania County. Orange, VA 22960. Augusta 1738 Formed from Orange County. Staunton, VA 24401. Albemarle 1744 Formed from Goochland County Culpeper 1749 Formed from Orange county Amherst 1761 Formed from southern part of Albemarle Botetourt 1770 Formed from Augusta County. Fincastle 1773 Formed from Botetourt County. Fincastle County no longer exists, the records are in Montgomery. Washington 1776 Formed from Fincastle County Montgomery 1777 Formed from Fincastle County. Greenbrier 1778 Formed from Montgomery and Botetourt. Russell 1786 Formed from Washington County Monroe 1798 Formed from Greenbrier. Nicholas 1818 Formed from Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Randolph. Fayette 1831 Formed from portions of Logan, Greenbrier, Nicholas and Kanawha counties

Slide 32: 

Virginia Counties

Sir Astley Cooperb: abt. 1680 a Surgeon and “Immigrant” from Chester, England Settled on Long Island, NY : 

Sir Astley Cooperb: abt. 1680 a Surgeon and “Immigrant” from Chester, England Settled on Long Island, NY Children: Nathan Abraham Cooper b: abt. 1700 Long Island, NY. Chester, England: "The ancient name of this city, it is said, was Neomagus, so called from Magus, son of Samothes, son of Japet (himself a son of Noah)- its founder, 240 years after the Flood; an assertion which, if authenticated, places Chester on a line of antiquity with any other city in the universe“. Cesar said it was, "A town amongst the Britons is nothing more than a thick wood fortified with a ditch and ramparts, to serve as a place of retreat against the incursions of their enemies" The name was later called Fortress Deva and covered an area of about 65 acres. With its imposing walls and great buildings, it must have been a breathtaking sight.

Black River Settlement, Chester County, NJ : 

Black River Settlement, Chester County, NJ The Coopers came from Long Island to Chester County, NJ. The oldest settlers in Chester Township came in 1640 when "Black River" established itself as a settlement primarily because of the intersection of two Lenape Indian trails. These old trails, used for hundreds of years by the native Americans were traversed by the early settlers to go to all regions of New Jersey.The first permanent European settlers arrived in Black River around 1720. Like the Coopers, they came mostly from Long Island to "the Landing" in New Brunswick and then overland on the "Grate Road" west to Roxbury. By 1740, the area of Black River was well established with settlers who had land grants from the King of England. The first residents farmed, operated mills, and distilled whiskey from apples and peaches. The native Americans began to disappear as they moved on to other counties in Virginia, although evidence of their activities and settlements can still be found on various hillsides near the River. Black River Settlement’s name changed to Milltown and then Chester, New Jersey. The Settlement area has been designated a County Park. Cooper’s Mill Visitor’s Center Cooper’s Mill http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=20322

Black River Settlement/Milltown/Chester : 

Black River Settlement/Milltown/Chester Nathan Cooper in 1825 bought about 4.5 acres of land which included a milldam, sawmill, an old gristmill, and the water wheel for $750. The following year, he replaced the mill with the present stone mill (Cooper Gristmill) and gave the new mill and property to his nephew Nathan A. Cooper.     The younger Cooper became a general in the N.J. Cavalry in 1854.  He was a wealthy man and also very generous.  He had nine children, two of whom died in infancy. Seven of them lived to maturity, and five of those married. To each child upon marriage, he gave a farm or a house. One of these children was Abram to whom he gave the house presently used as the Cooper Mill Visitors Center, adjacent to Cooper Mill on old Route 24 in Chester Township.      Abram inherited the mill and considerable property from his father upon the father's death in 1879. The Cooper Mill continued to operate to grind grain into flour until 1913. The Milltown general store, located across the street from the mill, burned down the same year. Ancestry The Cooper family descended from Sir Astley Cooper, a surgeon, from England. Some of the family in 1700 settled on Long Island. Nathan Abraham Cooper I, came to Roxiticus, which is now the towns of Mendham, Chester, Washington, Mount Olive and Roxbury. He purchased 1,600 acres (6 km2) of land, and erected a small framed house, in which the family lived for some years. His son, Nathan Cooper II (1725-1797), was born February 22, 1725, and was married in 1748 to Mehitable Seward, great aunt to ex-Secretary of State William H. Seward. They had six children. He died December 20, 1797 and he was buried in the Chester Congregational Cemetery in Chester, New Jersey. His wife died April 15, 1812. Their son, Abraham Cooper (1762-1818), was born February 18, 1762. He was married in 1799 to Anna Wills. Their children were Beulah Ann and Nathan Abraham Cooper. Abraham died September 13, 1818, and his wife April 25, 1856. Nathan A. Cooper, the subject of this article, was born April 20 1802. His wife, to whom he was married in 1843, was Mary Henrietta, youngest daughter of Dr. John W. Leddel of Ralstontown. Their children were: Anna E.Cooper; Abram W. Cooper; Beulah S. Cooper; Mary L. Cooper; Tillie R. Cooper; Laura H. Cooper; and Nathan A. Cooper. All of whom, as well as their mother, are living. General Cooper died of cardiac rheumatism July 25, 1879. http://www.historicchesternj.com/peopleplaces/milltown.html Gravestone of Nathan Cooper II (1725-1797) in Chester Cemetery, grandfather of Nathan Abraham Cooper Main Street Chester Old Milltown

Nathan Abraham Cooper b: abt. 1700 Long Island, NY. Pioneer of Black River Settlement, NJ s/o Sir Astley Cooper a Surgeon from England : 

Nathan Abraham Cooper b: abt. 1700 Long Island, NY. Pioneer of Black River Settlement, NJ s/o Sir Astley Cooper a Surgeon from England Children: Nathan Cooper II b: 1725 in Roxiticus, NJ d:1797 Abraham Cooper b: abt 1727 in Roxiticus, NJ went to Black River Settlement (Chester), NJ with his father. d: 1779 John Cooper b: abt 1729 in Roxiticus, NJ, went to Culpeper with Abraham As you read this, try to imagine what life was like over 200 years ago. In the early 1700s, the trails across New Jersey were Indian trails through densely wooded areas, and wide enough only for a man on horseback.  It was by these trails that a band of settlers from Southold and Easthampton, Long Island, came to the rolling green hills of Morris County.  Two of these trails crossed in the area that the Minisink Indians called “Alamatunk,” which meant “black earth bottom” for Black River. And “Black River” was the original name for Chester.        Most long-time “Chester-ites” say that no one knows why the name “Black River” was dropped and “Chester” was adopted.  Some of the residents had been calling their community “Chester” for a good while, and it has been noted that it probably was because Chester, England was the home of their ancestors.  These English ancestors migrated to New England and then to Southhold and the Hamptons in Long Island; their grandsons came to Black River in New Jersey.  The people of Black River must have felt great satisfaction when they received notice from the state that their wish to create their own township was granted!  Thus, on January 29th, 1779 the business of running the new Township Of Chester began. Black River Settlement (Chester, NJ)

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d: 1779 at Cowan’s Fort , Russell Co. VA. at 54 y.o. (killed by Indians) m: Frances Scott b: abt 1727 in Culpeper, VA (Scott-Indian Surname) Occupation: Carpenter & Owned a water Grist Mill built with his Brother John in Culpeper Co, VA. & later sold his share to John Settled Amherst Co sometime during years 1761-1776 Children: ABRAHAM COOPER Jr. was b. abt 1748 in Black River, NJ? Resided in Washington Co, VA; moved to Bedford Co. He was buried in Near Beltbuckle, Bedford Co., TN. He was married to (?) BROWNING abt 1775 in , Culpeper, VA. CHRISTOPHER COOPER, b. 12 May 1750, Black River NJ? , VA; d. 21 Sep 1833, Sanders, Cannon Co, TN FRANCIS COOPER b: abt 1752 in Black River, NJ? CALEB COOPER b: abt 1754 in Black River, NJ? BENJAMIN A. COOPER b: abt 1758 in Black River, NJ? BARNABAS B. COOPER b: 1760 in Black River, NJ; Resided in Amherst Co, VA; moved to Greenbrier Co., VA Thomas Cooper b: abt 1761 Amherst Co., VA -Married Margaret Hilard on July 2, 1781 in Greenbrier Co., VA Simeon Cooper b: abt 1766 Amherst Co., VA (captured by Indians in 1779 but escaped)? m: Margaret Tincher 1785 Grbr. Co. James Cooper b: abt 1768 in Amherst County, VA; moved to Greenbrier County, VA John Cooper b: abt 1769 in Amherst; Married Patty McDonald Apr 20, 1789 in Greenbrier Co. Peter Cooper b: abt 1772 in Amherst Co., VA; moved to Greenbrier County, VA Jesse Cooper b: abt. 1774 in Amherst County; moved to Greenbrier County, VA The 1782 Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List Cooper, Christopher 1-20-18 Cooper, Frances -2- (killed by Indians/escaped-same Frances? Or was the Frances who died, Abraham’s Brother?) Cooper, Abraham Jr.1-2- Old Grist Mill Abraham Cooper Sr. b: abt 1727 Roxiticus, NJ (Black River Settlement, NJ) with his father. Then on to Culpeper Co., VA & then settled Amherst Co. VA s/o: Nathan A. Cooper b: abt. 1700, pioneer of Black River Settlement

The Indian Massacre at Fort Cowan : 

The Indian Massacre at Fort Cowan The records of Culpeper County, formed from Orange County in 1749, support many of John Linzapher Cooper recollections and further characterize the Cooper story. Abraham Cooper Sr., who may have been born about 1725, was indeed found in Culpeper County 17 May 1750. He bought 400 acres of property on the north side of the North Branch of the Gourd Vine River, northwest of the present town of Culpeper. His occupation was listed as carpenter in this deed. Abraham Cooper Sr. apparently saved his money, because he and John Cooper bought eleven acres of land and the right to build a water grist mill from John Barricle 17 Aug 1768. His name was recorded as "Abram" in this document, but later was listed as "Abraham" and "Abram" when he sold the property to John. The two men had built the mill, but Abraham and his wife Frances sold the land and mill to John 20 Jul 1772. The deed is recorded as follows: "…between Abraham Cooper and Frances his wife of Culpeper County, Parish of Brumfield in the Colony of Virginia, and John Cooper of the same county and colony, for 100 current money of Virginia, covering all rights in the above described 11 acres and one water grist mill located and standing thereon which was built by the aforesaid Abram Cooper and John Cooper in equal partnership and one of them having and holding an equal part in the said mill and land which was purchased of John Barricle, in equal partnership to build the aforesaid mill on and by the said John Barricle was conveyed unto the said John Cooper and Abram Cooper by Deed dated 17 August 1768." Abraham joined in the Revolutionary War in 1774 while living in Amherst County. He was stationed at Fort Cowan. Even with the protection of the forts, life on the frontier was precarious and brutal: Indians attacked Cowan's Fort in 1779 and Abraham and his son or brother (Francis?) were killed? Another son, Christopher, documented this event in his application for a Revolutionary War pension and declared that "two young women was taken prisoner and he was one of the party that pursued & retook them again." [i][15] Cowan's Fort, also know as Fort Preston, Russell's Fort, Bickley's Fort, or Blackmore's Fort, was located behind the present day Masonic Lodge Hall in Castlewood, Russell County, Virginia.[ii][16]Barnabas joined the Revolutionary War in 1779 to help out the year his father died.

**From the Alexander Brown Papers in the Special Collections Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA A Partial List of Those Who Settled:1. in Old Albemarle prior to 17612. in Old Amherst prior to 1776….with3. some of those who served in the French and Indian War from Albemarle and Bedford4 and an incomplete list of those who served in the Revolutionary War from Old Amherst5. together with a list of Autographs written prior to 1800 : 

**From the Alexander Brown Papers in the Special Collections Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA A Partial List of Those Who Settled:1. in Old Albemarle prior to 17612. in Old Amherst prior to 1776….with3. some of those who served in the French and Indian War from Albemarle and Bedford4 and an incomplete list of those who served in the Revolutionary War from Old Amherst5. together with a list of Autographs written prior to 1800 Cooper Abraham b. sr. (killed by Indians in 1779 at Fort Cowan?) " J. ____ a." John b. au." Thomas a." Thomas c. sf.The List contains the following numbers: (This is the way Brown wrote his key)1. Of those who had interests in Old Albemarle prior to 1761, nearly 2000 and is nearly complete a. a.2. Of those who came to Old Amherst or became of age between 1761 and 1776, nearly 700 and is nearly complete (prior to 1761 included in #1)b.b.3. Of those who served in the French and Indian War from Albemarle (Amherst), about 150, incomplete a..st. a..sf.From Bedford, about 300, incomplete c. st. c. sf..4. Of those who served in the Revolutionary War from Old Amherst, About 800 incomplete b. sr. b. sr.5. Autographs prior to 1800, about 550 au. au.Total number of names in the list - 3822Note: Names are entered just as A. Brown has on his list. Some of his notations are unclear.Most can be deciphered from the key above. Abraham, John, & Thomas Cooper (brothers) settled Amherst & Albemarle Counties between the years prior to 1761-1776 (Alexander Brown Papers). Thomas is listed as a father on record of Marriages in Amherst County in 1788 & and John is listed as a Witness to a marriage in 1812. John is on the Amherst Tax List with Barnabas in 1785-1790 after 1790 Barnabas moved to Greenbrier County around Thomas Cooper and Simon Cooper who are his uncle & brother. Barnabas was born in 1760 and served in the Revolutionary war between 1779-1781(see his Revolutionary war pension application-he stated he lived in Amherst County. John stayed in Amherst County . John is listed as a “Blackman” on 1803 Amherst tax list. He had a son John Jr. listed as “Mulatto” in 1813. Records listed all Indians as Mulattos, Colored, Free Negros or Black men. You were either White or Colored, not Indian. Abraham was killed by Indians in 1779 when he served in the Revolutionary War at Fort Cowan and does not show up on property tax list of Amherst County. Thomas left Amherst County and moved to Greenbrier County before 1784 as he shows up on the 1784 Property Tax List of Greenbrier County and Greenbrier Marriages in 1781 to Margaret Hilard. Simon shows up in the Greenbrier Marriages in 1785 married to Margaret Tincher and is on the 1783 through 1799 tax list for Grbr. Barnabas shows up in the Greenbrier Marriages in 1798 married to Caty Cochran and 1808 married to Jeviah Hicks (both wives' names are listed on the Cherokee Surname list). Barnabas was married while he was in Amherst but wife is unknown, we feel sure he was married to an Indian Maiden because he is listed on the 1782-1822 Library of Virginia microfilm reels 18 and 19 “a list of other free mulattos future melungeons” . We think he moved to Greenbrier County after his wife died (in 1790 he would have been 30 years old) his children were young. Barnabas shows up on the 1815, 1820 & 1830 census with his children listed.

Slide 40: 

Amherst County, Virginia “Other Free” meaning other than White "Other Free" Heads of Household in the 1810 Virginia Census: by county*Note: "/" after a number indicates the number of slaves; ie., 4/1 means 4 "other free" and 1 slave. -0001 is a white female. (Mulo “Mulatto”, FN “Free Negro”) *Note: Cooper names only extracted from the list. AMHERST COUNTYPERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LIST 1782-1822Library of Virginia microfilm reels 18 and 19 list of “other free mulattos future melungeons”1785 frame 50 Cooper, John 110016 Cooper, Barnett 1001 1786 frame 67John Cooper 110012Barnabas Cooper 10011 1787 Amherst Parish (First District) frame 72Cooper, Ezekiel Cooper, John & Barnabas 300024 1788 A frame 118 Cooper, John son Ezekiel 2001 Cooper, Barnabas 1790 A -frame 121 frame 178 Cooper, Barnett 1002 Cooper, John son Ezekiel 2002 1793 B- frame 289 Cooper, John 1003 1794 B -frame 326 Cooper, John 1002 (We think Barnett & Barnabas may be same person-Barnabas Barnett Cooper, hence the nickname BB Cooper also called Barney) 1810 Amherst County Cooper, John 6 p.284 Cooper, John 4 p.302 1810 Hanover County Cooper, Jno 4 p.892 1810 King & Queen County (formed from New Kent county which was formed from York county) Cooper, Geo. FN 8 p.159 Cooper, Simon Mulo. 3 p.160 George, Cooper FN (Cooper, Geo.?) 4 p.165 1810 Norfolk County Cooper, John 1 p.893 Cooper, John 2 p.893 1810 Rockbridge County Cooper, John 6 p.298 1810 Washington County (all "free persons of couler") Cooper, Wm 4, p.210a Cooper, Polley 3, p.236b

Information from: Free Persons of Color in The Revolutionary War:http://www.aagsnc.org/columns/dec98col.htmRevolutionary Heroes  An incomplete list of those who served in the Revolutionary War from old Amherst County, (the present counties of Amherst and Nelson.) : 

Information from: Free Persons of Color in The Revolutionary War:http://www.aagsnc.org/columns/dec98col.htmRevolutionary Heroes  An incomplete list of those who served in the Revolutionary War from old Amherst County, (the present counties of Amherst and Nelson.) Conner, James; Coop, Adam; Cooper, Abraham; (Cooper, Barnabas was listed on Fayette County application for Revolutionary pension, but he lived in Amherst County before & after he enlisted) (Fayette County was formed from Greenbrier County where he moved after abt.1790) Cottrell, Gilbert & James; Cos, Archeleus; Crawford, Joel, John, Nathan, Nelson & Peter; Crawley, Thomas; Creasy, Charles & George; Crews, Gideon, Joseph Sr., & Joseph Jr.; Crittenden, Richard; Crutcher, (or Croncher), William Natives in the Revolutionary War – The Amherst County Militia excerpt: The Amherst County Militia and Marquis De Lafayette’s unit, were participants in, The Siege of Yorktown. Rawley Pinn, his brother Robert, and nephews Billy, Jim, and John, fought at The Siege of Yorktown. Robert and his sons marched to Yorktown from Lancaster County Virginia. John Pinn left an account of their participation in his pension file, when he was living in Massachusetts (he was a Seamen). Some of the Native Surnames in the Siege of Yorktown were, Pinn, Cooper, Redcross, Evans, Lawless, Hartless, Johns, and Rives. With the assistance of the Virginia Council on Indians, a request was submitted for a Highway Marker to the Virginia Historical Resources Office. They would like to see a marker honoring the Natives who fought in the Revolutionary War. Because they were identified as black, Mulatto, or even white, Natives have not gotten proper recognition. “The Coopers are considered to be Melungeon, Portuguese or Black Dutch, and are sometimes found listed as Free Persons of Color, Mulatto or Indian. Naming patterns, family traditions and DNA testing confirm they are Jewish” familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/p/a/n/Donald-N-Pantheryates (Indians, the lost tribe of Israel?)

Barnabas “BB” Cooper Birth: 1760 in Black River, New Jersey (now Chester, NJ). He resided in Amherst/Albemarle Co., VA. s/o Abraham Cooper b: 1727 Black River, NJ : 

Barnabas “BB” Cooper Birth: 1760 in Black River, New Jersey (now Chester, NJ). He resided in Amherst/Albemarle Co., VA. s/o Abraham Cooper b: 1727 Black River, NJ He resided in Amherst County (formed 1761 from Albemarle) before & after Revolutionary War, then moved to Greenbrier County, VA after 1788 (See application for pension). Death: 6 Jan 1833 in Fayette County, (West) Virginia (Fayette County was created in 1831 from portions of Logan, Greenbrier, Nicholas and Kanawha counties ) Barnabas was born1760 in Black River, New Jersey and there is a high probability he and Abraham are related to the Nathan Abraham Coopers from Chester Township, NJ. Note: We feel that Abraham or his brother John Cooper could be the father of Barnabas. Abraham, John, & Thomas Cooper (brothers) Settled Albemarle/Amherst Counties. However, we feel it is more likely Abraham Due to the fact that Barnabas named his son, Abraham Abel after his father? and called his Son Abel due to the fact that a close member Of the family (his father?) was called Abraham... BARNABAS COOPERFAYETTE COUNTYPRIVATEVIRGINIA MILITIA$80.00 ANNUAL ALLOWANCE$147.10 AMOUNT RECEIVEDAUGUST 9, 1833 PENSION STARTEDAGE 74DIED JANUARY 6, 1833 Crossroads School, Black River Settlement (Chester) N.J. Nathan Cooper, Barnabas’ cousin, and Benjamin McCourry built this stone schoolhouse on Sept. 15, 1830 at what has been referred to as the Crossroads. The top level was used As a meeting house and the bottom level was used as a School.

Scenes from the Revolutionary WarBarnabas served in Revolutionary war in the years 1779-1781 : 

Scenes from the Revolutionary WarBarnabas served in Revolutionary war in the years 1779-1781 Abraham Cooper, Barnabas Cooper, Frances Cooper, Simon Cooper & Abner Cooper (Simon’s son) all served in some capacity in the Revolutionary War

Slide 44: 

Greenbrier County Marriages

Slide 45: 

Barnabas’ Application/Request for Revolutionary War Pension

Slide 46: 

Black River Settlement, where Barnabas was born, is located at Chester County, New Jersey. The same location of the Cooper Grist Mill. Barnabas went to Amherst County as a boy.

Slide 47: 

At the bottom of this letter you can see where someone repeated Barnabas Cooper’s year of birth and Birthplace That was inserted on the second page of this document.

Slide 48: 

Abel Cooper is ‘Abraham Abel’ Cooper-Barnabas’ Son.

Slide 49: 

Barnabas Cooper’s Application/Appeal for Revolutionary War Pension Amount of money Barnabas received for Revolutionary War Pension

Slide 50: 

Muddy Creek Mountain Massacre, Greenbrier County, West Virginia 1796 Barnabas bought 220 acres on the south and lower end of Muddy Creek Mountain and on the north side of Greenbrier River The Muddy Creek Mtn. Massacre In 1763, the Shawnee led by Cornstalk, massacred a settlement along the western flank of the mountain, since known as the Muddy Creek Mountain Massacre. The John Thomas Williams‘ family was a part of the event with Mr. Williams massacred and his wife and some of his children captured. At least two of his sons were away from the house when it happened and escaped. The See and Yoakum family were living near Muddy Creek and were murdered or captured. Then the Indians moved on to the Clendenin farm. And after that to Kerr's Creek. It is possible that there were others massacred or captured.

Slide 51: 

Location: Greenbrier County. Description: 220 acres on the south and lower end of Muddy Creek Mountain and on the north side of Greenbrier River adjoining a survey made for Krouse being on the top of the lower end of said mountain. Source: Land Office Grants No. 39, 1797-1798, p. 41 (Reel 105).Part of the index to the recorded copies of grants issued by the Virginia Land Office. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia. Subject - Personal Cooper, Barnabas. grantee. 1797 Barnabas Cooper’s property

Barnabas Cooper’s Land Grant in Greenbrier County : 

Barnabas Cooper’s Land Grant in Greenbrier County Land Office Grants Grant Title Cooper, Barnabas.Publication15 August 1796.Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-.RelatedSee also the following surname(s): Kooper. Note Location: Greenbrier County. Description: 220 acres on the south and lower end of Muddy Creek Mountain and on the north side of Greenbrier River adjoining a survey made for Krouse being on the top of the lower end of said mountain. Source: Land Office Grants No. 39, 1797-1798, p. 41 (Reel 105).Part of the index to the recorded copies of grants issued by the Virginia Land Office. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia. Subject – Personal Cooper, Barnabas. grantee. Subject - Topical Land titles --  Registration and transfer --  West Virginia -- Greenbrier County. Subject -Geographic Greenbrier Co. (WV)  -- History -- 18th century. Genre/Form Land grants --  West Virginia -- Greenbrier County. Added Entry Virginia. Land Office. Register.  Land grants, 1779- Library of Virginia.  Archives System Number000739826 Muddy Creek Mountain rises beyond the Muddy Creek Valley. In central Greenbrier County, Muddy Creek Mountain is a rock crested geologic fold that marks the western edge of the Big Levels some 10 miles west of Fairlea and Lewisburg, WV.

Barnabas Cooper’s Family: : 

Barnabas Cooper’s Family: Father: Abraham Cooper b: abt 1727 died 1779Mother: Francis Scott b: abt 1727 died abt 1800 (Scott is an Cherokee Indian Surname) Marriage1: unknown (Indian Maiden)? in 1778 Amherst County died: 1789? He Is listed as having future Mulattos/Melungeons on 1782-1822 Amherst Tax List Marriage 2: Caty Cochran on Mar 20, 1798 Greenbrier County (Cherokee Indian Surname) Virginia Marriages: 1782-1900 (died/divorced 1804?) Marriage 3: Jeviah Hicks Mar 5, 1808 Greenbrier County (Cherokee Indian Surname) Virginia Marriages: 1782-1900 Greenbrier County Note: 1820 Frankfort, Greenbrier Co., Va CensusCooper, Barnabas (aged 45+), he was 60 year old Cooper, Francis (aged 26-45 wife aged 26-45) guessing his age was 30 Cooper, Jesse (aged 45+) Cooper, Silas (aged 26-45; wife aged 26-45) guessing his age was 42 Cooper, Thomas (aged 26-45; wife aged 26-45) guessing his age was 37 Cooper, William (aged 38) Note: 1830 Greenbrier Co, VA Census Cooper, Barnabas 70 y.o. Cooper, Francis (aged 30-40) Cooper, Jesse (55 y.o.) Children John Cooper b: abt 1778 in Amherst County resided in Greenbrier Co. Bought land 1797 William Cooper b: abt 1782 in Amherst County married Laura Smith in 1808 (Culpeper Co?) resided in Greenbrier Co. Thomas Cooper b: abt 1783 in Amherst County raised in Greenbrier co. Silas Cooper b: abt. 1785 in Amherst County raised in Greenbrier Co. Francis ‘Frank’ Cooper b: abt 1789 in Amherst Co., VA (his Mother died giving birth?) m: Elizabeth Miller 1820 Greenbrier co. Nancy Cooper b: abt 1798 in Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Abraham Abel Cooper b: abt 1800 in Greenbrier County Margaret Cooper b: abt 1801 in Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Phoebe Cooper b: abt 1802 in Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Elizabeth Cooper b: abt 1804 in Greenbrier County AMHERST COUNTYPERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LIST 1782-1822Library of Virginia microfilm reels 18 and 19 list of other free mulattos future melungeons (married to/or Indians) 1785 frame 50 Cooper, John 110016 Cooper, Barnett 1001 1786 frame 67John Cooper 110012Barnabus Cooper 10011 1787 Amherst Parish (First District) frame 72Cooper, Ezekiel Cooper, John & Barnabus 300024 1788 A frame 118 Cooper, John son Ezekiel 2001 Cooper, Barnabus 1790 A -frame 121 frame 178 Cooper, Barnett 1002 Cooper, John son Ezekiel 2002 1793 B- frame 289 Cooper, John 1003 1794 B -frame 326 Cooper, John 1002

Slide 54: 

*In 1810 a Simon Cooper shows up in King & Queen Co. And listed as a ‘Mulo’ meaning Indian.

Slide 55: 

*Barnabas died in 1833 in Fayette County which Was formed from Greenbrier County.

Land Records West Virginia- Cooper Land Records : 

Land Records West Virginia- Cooper Land Records Sims Index of Land Grants of West Virginia: "The land grants listed herein were made by Lord Fairfax prior to the creation of the Virginia Land Office; by the Commonwealth of Virginia of lands now embracing the State of West Virginia under its Constitution. Preparation of this index was made pursuant to Chapter 120, Acts of the 1951 sessions of the West Virginia Legislature." NAME: AMOUNT OF ACRES: WHERE: YEAR: BOOK NUMBER: PAGE NUMBER: BERKELEY COUNTY: COOPER, FRANCES-25 ACRES-PARSON'S CREEK-1853-BOOK 1- PAGE 121 COOPER, FRANCES-95 ACRES-PARSON'S CREEK-1854-BOOK 1- PAGE 153 COOPER, WILLIAM-65 ACRES-LAUREL CREEK-1855-BOOK 1- PAGE 157 CABELL COUNTY: COOPER, SILAS-50 ACRES-WTS. OF MUD-1834-2-442 COOPER, THOMAS-95-SUGAR TREE FORK-1850-4-406 COOPER, WILLIAM-50-BIG LAUREL CREEK-1838-3-328 GILMER COUNTY: COOPER, JAMES H.-116-TANNER'S FORK-1849-1-515 COOPER, JAMES H.-387-JESSE'S RUN-1856-2-521 COOPER, JAMES H.-370-BRUSHY FORK-1856-2-522 GREENBRIER COUNTY: COOPER, BARNABUS-220-MUDDY CREEK Mtn-1796-4-116 COOPER, JOHN-100-WTS. OF RICH CREEK-1797-4-54 COOPER. PHILLIP-165-INDIAN CREEK-17932-513 COOPER, LEONARD-200-WTS. OF KANAWHA-1791-2-397 COOPER, LEONARD ET AL-630 1/2-WTS. OF ELK-1787-1-465 COOPER, LEONARD ET AL-131 1/2-WTS. OF ELK-1787-1-466 COOPER, LEONARD ET AL-286-WTS. OF ELK-1788-2-134 COOPER, LEONARD ET AL-103-WTS. OF POTACALICO RIVER-1788-2-135 COOPER, PHILLIP-175-FORK RUN-1793-2-517 COOPER, PHILLIP-370-DROPPING LICK-1792-2-449 COOPER, WILLIAM-380-TURKEY CREEK-1787-1-314 HAMPSHIRE COUNTY: COOPER, ADAM-14-DILLON'S RUN-1838-7-30 COOPER, ADAM-132-SANDY RIDGE-1840-7-41 COOPER, ANDREW-265-PATTERSON'S CREEK-1790-8-558 COOPER, ANDREW-584-POINTER'S RUN-1790-8-525 COOPER. ANDREW-817a.18p. GEORGE'S RUN-1790-8-523 COOPER, ANDREW-400-KNOBLY MOUNTAIN-1789-8-253 COOPER, ANDREW-550-ADJ. J. STARR-1795-6-428 COOPER, ANDREW-320-NORTH RIVER-1791-6-69 COOPER, ANDREW-352-SOUTH BR.-1791-6-68 COOPER, ANDREW-788-MILL CREEK-1791-6-67 COOPER, ANDREW-340-GR. CAPAPON-1791-6-66 COOPER, GEORGE W.-5 3/4-LITTLE CACAPON-1856-1-320 COOPER, JACOB-19 ½ -NORTH RIVER-1831-3-271 COOPER, JOEL-8 1/2-NORTH RIVER-1856-7-423 COOPER, JOHN-50-NORTH RIVER-1802-9-382 COOPER, THOMAS-373-ELK LICK-1786-8-8 HARDY COUNTY: COOPER, ENOS-50-JOHNY CAKE RUN-1857-4-415 COOPER, JOHN-67-MILL CREEK-1840-4-45 COOPER, VALENTINE-57-SOUTH FORK MOUNTAIN-1821-3-225 COOPER, VALENTINE-10-SOUTH MILL CREEK-1821-3-224 COOPER, VALENTINE-100-SOUTH MILL CREEK-1805-3-104 COOPER, VALENTINE-45-MILL CREEK-1792-1-246 COOPER, VALENTINE-19-MILL CREEK-1792-1-245 COOPER, VALENTINE-33-MILL CREEK-1792-1-206 COOPER, VALENTINE-81-MILL CREEK-1792-1-207 KANAWHA COUNTY: COOPER, LEONARD-3000-WTS. OF MUD RIVER-1801-130 COOPER, LEONARD-150-RIGHT FORK TEN-MILE CREEK-1799-1-179 COOPER, LEONARD-500-LITTLE SANDY CREEK-1836-2-310 MERCER COUNTY: COOPER, CHARLES-20-12 MILE FORK-1851-1-353 MONONGALIA COUNTY: COOPER, FREDERICK-96-WTS. CHEAT RIVER-1784-1-101 COOPER, JOHN ET AL-400-SANDY CREEK-1809-6-49 MASON COUNTY: COOPER, GEORGE & HANNA ET AL-300-10 MILE CREEK-1835-1-553 COOPER, GEORGE & HANNA ET AL-225-ADJ. TO WILLIAM STEPHENSON-1830-1-497 NOTE: William Stephenson's property lists: #1-adj. To Charles Pullens-which is adj. To John Cantrell property-which is listed 5 properties=a. 5 mile creek; b. 10 mile creek; c. 13 mile creek; d. big mill creek and e. adj to A. fisher property. #2. Adj to H. Cooper. #3. 8 mile creek. COOPER, ISAAC-150-ADJ. TO WILLIAM STEPHENSON-1825-1-416 COOPER, JOHN-78-10 MILE CREEK-1853-2-216 COOPER, NANCY ET AL-115-ROCK CASTLE-1835-1-550 COOPER, WILLIAM ET AL-390-ADJ. TO WILLIAM STEPHENSON-1851-2-190 WYOMING COUNTY: COOPER, AUSTIN-390-SKIN FORK-1856-1-320 TYLER COUNTY: COOPER, JOHN-200-PROCTER'S RUN-1832-1-281 WOOD COUNTY: COOPER, LEMUEL ET AL-298-COW RUN-1860-3-498 COOPER, VALENTINE-100-TYGERT'S CREEK-1809-1-69 COOPER, VALENTINE-133-COR. TO PAUL ARMSTRONG-1802-1-18 BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA: COOPER, JAMES-20 ACRES-CARTMILL CREEK-1810-1-156 BOONE COUNTY, (W)VA: COOPER, FRANCIS-48-ADJ. TO HENRY SMITH-1868-1-443 PUTNAM COUNTY, (W)VA: COOPER, THOMAS-240-18 MILES CREEK-1866-1-254

Racism Shown to Coopers in 1800’s : 

Excerpt from: Black Confederates and Afro-Yankees in Civil War Virginia  By Ervin L. Jordan Five blacks were pardoned in 1863. Thomas Cooper was pardoned from on the condition he sells himself into slavery. He had been convicted of Grand Larceny in Augusta County and sentenced to 5 years. His exemplary behavior earned him a momentary release and one form of bondage for another form. Another unusual case concerned a slave named Simon who had been convicted of breaking and entering. An examination of the evidence by Governor Letcher led to Simon’s unconditional pardon. December 1861, an intoxicated confederate soldier, William Langdon, tried to shoot to kill Henry Cooper, a slave hack driver, recognizing his passenger’s condition, requested payment in advance. Instead Langdon shot him. Langdon tried to flee but was convicted of a misdemeanor and fined a $1000.00 because the crime was against property because Cooper was a slave. Limitations caused by slavery and racism to take advantage of good cheer but for William Cooper of Richmond, being caught without his free papers during 1862 holiday made a season of the whip instead of mistletoe. Richmond, VA Marriage license: 1824 William Cooper & Catherine Jane Harness free people of color. Virginia Historical Society | Guide to African American Manuscripts Index: Cooper, Samuel, p. 219 Cooper, Thomas, p. 762 Coopers, p. 627, p. 679 COOPER: Mary Cooper was named executor of the estate of Joseph Cooper when he died in Bladen in 1779. Name found among the Lumbees (DeMarce, 1992). Death records show the Indian name of Cooper in 1940 in Smiths township, related to the Lowry family. In Robeson the name may be White or Indian. Racism Shown to Coopers in 1800’s

Silas Cooper Birth: Abt 1785 in Amherst Co, (West) Virginia s/o Barnabas Cooper b: 1760 Black River, NJ : 

Silas Cooper Birth: Abt 1785 in Amherst Co, (West) Virginia s/o Barnabas Cooper b: 1760 Black River, NJ Raised in Greenbrier County Settled Lincoln County 1807 with his brother William (Lincoln Co. formed in 1867 from Kanawha, Boone, Putnam, and Cabell counties-Cabell formed 1809 from Kanawha Co.) Death: Abt 1870 in Lincoln County, West Virginia Father Barnabas Cooper b: 1760 Amherst Co, VAMother: Unknown Indian Maiden? b: abt 1762 Marriage: Lucy Hudson b: Abt 1790 in Virginia d: aft 1860 Cabell, Co. WV Children John Henry Cooper b: Abt 1806 in Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Mary Cooper b: Bef 1814 Cabell County William Cooper b: 1814 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia Unknown Cooper b: Bef 1816 Unknown Cooper b: Bef 1818 Unknown Cooper b: Bef 1820 Hudson 'Huts' Cooper b: Abt 1824 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia Francis Cooper b: Abt 1831 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia Mud River in 2007 a tributary of Guyandotte River Guyandotte River showing tributary Of Mud River

Silas Cooper (continued) : 

Silas Cooper (continued) Note: 1820 Frankfort, Greenbrier County, Virginia Census Cooper, Barnabas Cooper, Francis Cooper, Jesse Cooper, Silas Cooper, Thomas Tax List: 1815 Greenbrier County, VA Tax List: 1820 Greenbrier County, VA Census: 1830 Western District, Cabell Co. VACensus: 1850 10 District, Cabell Co. VACensus: 1860 Paw Paw Bottom District, Cabell Co. VAExcerpt fromHistory of West Virginia in Two PartsBy Virgil A. Lewis (Corresponding Member of the Virginia Historical Society)Published 1889, Philadelphia, by Hubbard Brotherspp. 730-733, LINCOLN COUNTY- Lincoln County was formed in 1867 from Kanawha, Boone, Putnam, and Cabell Counties. First settlements of homes along 10 mile Creek **Pioneers: The first settlement within the county the date of which can be ascertained was that made by Jesse McComas, John McComas, David McComas, William and Moses McComas, all of whom came in the year 1799. In the summer of that year they cultivated twenty acres of corn, probably the first ever grown in the Upper Guyandotte Valley. In the autumn they returned east of the mountains and brought their families. Near them other cabins were soon reared by John Lucas, William Hinch and John Johnson. About the year 1800, Isaac Hatfield settled on Ranger's branch, a tributary of Ten-mile creek, and James Hatfield, William Smith and John L. Baker soon came to reside in the same vicinity. In 1807, Luke Adkins found a home near the mouth of Slash creek, on Mud river, twelve miles southeast of the present site of Hamlin. Near him other cabins were reared by his brothers, John and Mark, William and Richard Lovejoy, William Cummins, Mathias Plumley, Silas Cooper, Hamilton Adkins, Peter Holstein, William Smith and William Cooper. In 1801, John Tackett removed his family to a cabin on Trace-fork creek. Other early settlers along the same stream were James Wells, Jonathan Williams, Joseph Holley, James Alford, Reuben Cremeans, Abraham Smith and George Alford. In 1811, Richard Parsons led the way into the wilderness and settled at the mouth of Cobb's creek. Those who came to reside near him on the stream were Eli Parsons, Samuel M. Midkiff, and James Lively. Silas later, in 1854, moved to Mud River in Cabell County (see Sims Index of Land Grants of WV). West Virginia Farm in the 1800’s

William Cooper Birth: 1814 in Greenbrier County (Lincoln Co today), (West) VAs/o Silas Cooper b: abt 1785 Amherst Co, VA : 

William Cooper Birth: 1814 in Greenbrier County (Lincoln Co today), (West) VAs/o Silas Cooper b: abt 1785 Amherst Co, VA Death: Aft 1880 in Union Dist., Lincoln County, West Virginia Father: Silas Cooper b: Abt 1785 in Amherst County, (West) VA Mother: Lucy Hudson b: Abt 1787 in Virginia Marriage 1 Elizabeth 'Betty' Ann Smith b: 15 Aug 1816 in Grbr. Co. d/o Jacob Smith b: 1788 lived in Raleigh Co. WV (s/o Christopher Smith & Elizabeth) & Susan Campbell (d/o Archibald Campbell s/o Dr. James Campbell in Nicholas Co, WV) (Campbell is a Cherokee Indian Surname) Married: 15 Apr 1835 in Huntington, Cabell County, (West) VA Children: Mary A. Cooper b: Abt 1835 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia Nancy Cooper b: Abt 1837 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia Lucretia Cooper b: 4 Oct 1839 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia Clarinda Cooper b: Sep 1842 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia Silas Cooper b: 17 Mar 1844 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia Elizabeth Jane Cooper b: Abt 1845 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia William Francis Cooper b: 25 Dec 1847 in Boone County, (West) Virginia John Campbell Cooper b: Abt 1850 in Boone County, (West) Virginia Josiah Benjamin Cooper b: Abt 1851 in Boone County, (West) Virginia Sarah Emily Cooper b: May 1852 in Boone County, (West) Virginia Matilda S. Cooper b: 25 Feb 1855 in Boone County, (West) Virginia Leonzo Cooper b: Abt 1857 in Boone County, (West) Virginia James Lewis Cooper b: 22 Mar 1859 in Boone County, (West) Virginia West Virginia Countryside in Allegheny Mountains.

Slide 61: 

Cooper Francis 39 M w Farmer 250 470 Virginia (William’s Bro.). . . . . Cooper Elizabeth 35 F w Keeps House . . Virginia . . . Cooper Hudson 12 M w Works on farm . . Virginia . . . . Cooper Julia 10 F w At home . . Virginia . . . . Cooper James F. 9 M w At home . . Virginia . . . . Cooper Granison 7 M w At home . . Virginia . . . . Cooper Lucinda 6 F w At home . . Virginia . . . . . Cooper Floyed 3 M w At home .. Virginia 1870 Lincoln County Census Jefferson Township 1870 Lincoln county Census Union Township Cooper Wm. 56 M w Farmer 425 480 Virginia . . . . . Cooper Elizabeth 52 F w Keeps House . . Virginia . . Cooper John 19 M w Labors on farm . . Virginia . . . . Cooper Matilda 17 F w At home . . Virginia . . . . Cooper Leanza 13 F w At home . . Virginia . . . . Cooper James 10 M w At home . . Virginia . . . . Cooper Benjamin 17 M w Works on farm . . Virginia Cooper Silas 27 M w Labors on farm . . Virginia (Wm. Son). Cooper Mary Jane 19 F w Keeps House . . Virginia . . Cooper Viola 1 F w At home . . Virginia . . . . . . . . Cooper Philena 4/12 F w At home . . Virginia 1870 Lincoln county Census Carroll Township Cooper Hudson 46 M w Farmer 200 118 Virginia (Wm.Bro) Cooper Julia 50 F w Keeping House . . Virginia . . Cooper Lewis 13 M w Labors on farm . . Virginia . . Cooper Mary Susan 11 F w At home . . Virginia Cooper Thomas 22 M w Labors on farm . . Virginia . . . . Cooper Martha 23 F w Keeping House . . Virginia . . . . . Cooper Auston 1/12 M w At home . . Virginia . . May . . . Cooper Catharine 52 F w Keeping House . . Virginia . . Cooper Sarah 27 F w At home All Coopers listed in Lincoln County in 1870 Census 424a 9 Cooper Auston 1/12 Virginia carroll.txt 478a 14 Cooper Benjamin 17 Virginia union.txt 424a 10 Cooper Catharine 52 Virginia carroll.txt 422a 17 Cooper Eliza J. 14 Virginia carroll.txt 478a 9 Cooper Elizabeth 52 Virginia union.txt 456a 13 Cooper Elizabeth 35 Virginia jefferson.txt 456a 19 Cooper Floyed 3 Virginia jefferson.txt 456a 12 Cooper Francis 39 Virginia jefferson.txt 456a 17 Cooper Granison 7 Virginia jefferson.txt 422a 1 Cooper Hudson 46 Virginia carroll.txt 456a 14 Cooper Hudson 12 Virginia jefferson.txt 478a 13 Cooper James 10 Virginia union.txt 456a 16 Cooper James F. 9 Virginia jefferson.txt 478a 10 Cooper John 19 Virginia union.txt 422a 2 Cooper Julia 50 Virginia carroll.txt 456a 15 Cooper Julia 10 Virginia jefferson.txt 478a 12 Cooper Leanza 13 Virginia union.txt 422a 3 Cooper Lewis 13 Virginia carroll.txt 456a 18 Cooper Lucinda 6 Virginia jefferson.txt 424a 8 Cooper Martha 23 Virginia carroll.txt 478a 20 Cooper Mary Jane 19 Virginia union.txt 422a 4 Cooper Mary Susan 11 Virginia carroll.txt 478a 11 Cooper Matilda 17 Virginia union.txt 466a 14 Cooper Nancy 19 Virginia sheridan.txt 478a 22 Cooper Philena 4/12 Virginia union.txt 424a 11 Cooper Sarah 27 Virginia carroll.txt 478a 19 Cooper Silas 27 Virginia union.txt 424a 7 Cooper Thomas 22 Virginia carroll.txt 478a 21 Cooper Viola 1 Virginia union.txt 478a 8 Cooper Wm. 56 Virginia union.txt

James ‘Jack’ Lewis CooperBirth: 22 Mar 1859 in Boone County, (West) VAs/o William Cooper b: 1814 Greenbrier Co., WV : 

James ‘Jack’ Lewis CooperBirth: 22 Mar 1859 in Boone County, (West) VAs/o William Cooper b: 1814 Greenbrier Co., WV Death: 14 Sep 1936 in Midkiff, Laurel Hill Dist., Lincoln County, West Virginia Buried in Cooper Cemetery off Six Mile Rd on Bluelick Branch Rd near his home in Hubball, WV Father: William Cooper b: 1814 in Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Mother: Elizabeth 'Betty' Ann Smith b: 15 Aug 1816 in Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia d/o Jacob Smith (b:1788 Rockingham Co, VA) & Susan Campbell (b:1790 Greenbrier Co.) Marriage: Mary 'Mollie' Ellen Nelson b: 10 Mar 1859 in Kanawha County, (West) Virginia death: 1934 d/o David Nelson b: Dec. 16, 1826 in Monroe Co. WV & Mary Jane Strickler b: Oct. 23, 1828. Married: Abt 1882 Children Alonzo Cooper b: 2 Jun 1883 in Lincoln County, West Virginia (child Guy Cooper) Stella B. Cooper b: Apr 1884 in Lincoln County, West Virginia Flora Cooper b: 17 Apr 1885 in Lincoln County, West Virginia Elihue Cooper b: Mar 1887 in Lincoln County, West Virginia Columbus Cooper b: Dec 1889 in Lincoln County, West Virginia Willie Cooper b: Aug 1891 in Lincoln County, West Virginia Virgie Cooper b: Jun 1893 in Laurel Hill Dist., Lincoln County, West Virginia Daisy Cooper b: abt 1895 in Laurel Hill Dist. Lincoln County, WV Barn Built by James Lewis Cooper

Slide 63: 

The Great Adventure: Looking for the Cooper Cemetery where James Lewis Cooper & wife Mary (Molly) are buried was quite an adventure. We traipsed all over the hills around the old home place and still did not find it. We have a new appointment to see owner Mr. Ellis Adkins. We ran across some interesting items and places: Rock with a cross on it and a nearby area with hewn Stones arranged in a pattern, maybe satanic rituals? Cliff, Sherman, Bonnie, Louise, Violet (mom), & Donna The Cooper descendents are genealogicalling again!

OUR GREAT ADVENTURE: Where’s the Cooper Cemetery? : 

OUR GREAT ADVENTURE: Where’s the Cooper Cemetery? Worn out after our great adventure We wore ourselves silly! And no Cooper Cemetery! But we did find the Yeager Cemetery. I’ll drink to that! The Great Detectives Bonnie, Louise, Cliff The Great Adventure Gang After all that detecting, a cold drink was in order

Slide 65: 

A Cooper’s Headstone and Rocks for headstone beside it may be Coopers. You can make out the word ‘Cooper’. Yeager/Cooper Cemetery where Alonzo Cooper (James’ son) (d: 1940), wife, Lilly, & Herbert Cooper & EKC (Everett Cooper), who are Alonzo’s sons, are buried. Pictured are headstones of all. Yeager Cemetery “Chuck Yeager’s” Family Cemetery, James Lewis Cooper’s son, Alonzo (our great uncle), Married into the Yeager Family.

Slide 66: 

Log home on Six mile road, Hubball, WV close to Yeager Cemetery. Wonder who used to live there? Alonzo had two headstones in the cemetery, One was modern with wife’s name included And this one had just Alonzo’s name on it. Was it a child? Different dates. Cooper Headstone

Where’s the Cooper Cemetery? : 

Where’s the Cooper Cemetery? I have conquered! But I’m not sure what… Louise: “Look what I found!” What? Do you think it is Satanic Worshipers? Tom “The Criminal”-he hunted and trespassed! Tom: “Do you think it is a headstone or what?” I think I can make out the word “Mom” or “Molly” Cliff

Misery loves company sowe drug others along! : 

Misery loves company sowe drug others along! Donna drug Tom along Cliff even drug Vivian along in her Church clothes, but Bonnie remembered the last time she was in the woods and drug along her toilet paper! Louise was loving it all! Poor old Mom & Sam were drug along to help search too! Mom wasn’t too sure whether to get out of the car or not for this “great” adventure

The Great Adventure continued: What is it? : 

The Great Adventure continued: What is it? “Bring out the oxygen” It might be the cemetery, let’s take a picture just in case. Cut it out Donna, someday you’ll be old and need oxygen too! We have to go where? (The only thing we found in there were ticks!!!) Bonnie, Louise, & Vivian Bonnie, Donna, Vivian

The Great Adventure continued:At least some things were identifiable! : 

The Great Adventure continued:At least some things were identifiable! Kinda looks like foundation stones to me Instead of headstones. At least Bonnie found something we can identify: a Turtle! Cliff found a bright-blue inky mushroom & a red one too. Cliff, “Look how Blue. Have you ever seen any thing like it before?”

Slide 71: 

Original house burned down but House on the right was rebuilt by James Lewis Cooper and later Remodeled by others. Looking down at the farm from Bluelick Branch Rd. Cliff, Bonnie, Louise Louise, Donna, & Bonnie Looking back up to the road where barn is located Our Great Adventure was fruitful: We did find James Lewis Cooper’s home place:

Slide 72: 

Looking down at James Lewis Cooper’s homeplace from Blue Lick Branch Road. Would make the perfect picture postcard! Violet ‘Boots’ (Cooper) (Hager) Albright states she was born here, then Moved to Mug Hollow Rd. off of Harless Fork Rd. which is off of 4 Mile Rd. Branchland, WV

Bonnie and Louise trying the old hand pump on the James Lewis Cooper( their Great Grandfather's) Farm on Blue Lick Branch Road Off 6 mile in Hubball WV : 

Bonnie and Louise trying the old hand pump on the James Lewis Cooper( their Great Grandfather's) Farm on Blue Lick Branch Road Off 6 mile in Hubball WV Bonnie and Louise 2009

“The old house burned down, the out buildings are original. According to Deputy Scarberry, the gravel road to the left of the farm that we were walking is where the graves/cemetery was- near the old home place. Owner now: Ellis Adkins , p.o. box 455, Branchland WV 25506-possible phone no. 304-778-6615. I am going to write or call and try for July 31, 2pm-3pm Fri. to see him so we can finally see the Cooper Cemetery. Cliff’s going to bring his mule (4-wheeler),” Louise. : 

“The old house burned down, the out buildings are original. According to Deputy Scarberry, the gravel road to the left of the farm that we were walking is where the graves/cemetery was- near the old home place. Owner now: Ellis Adkins , p.o. box 455, Branchland WV 25506-possible phone no. 304-778-6615. I am going to write or call and try for July 31, 2pm-3pm Fri. to see him so we can finally see the Cooper Cemetery. Cliff’s going to bring his mule (4-wheeler),” Louise. Original old shed/barn that was built by James Cooper. The old home place is located at the end of Bluelick Branch Rd. Off 6 Mile Road at Hubball James Lewis Cooper’s Old Home-place James Lewis Cooper’s old barn

Slide 75: 

Map from Route 10 to Hubball and then to Bluelick Branch Road Off Six Mile Creek Rd. Farm is located at the dead end of Bluelick Branch Road.

Tom and Donna Morton (Louise's daughter and son-in law) Cliff Hager( brother to Louise & Bonnie), Bonnie Altizer( sister to Louise & Cliff), and (Aletha) Louise Webb ( sister to Bonnie & Cliff), and Violet Cooper ( Hager) Albright( Mother and Grandmother), all pile on to Cliff's 4 wheel drive Kubota Mule to go to the Cooper Cemetery on top of the hill where their Great Grandparents ( James Lewis, and Mary (Molly ) are buried. Donna Morton is the Great , Great Grandchild Of James & Mary Cooper. This is the first time any of us have seen the cemetery, we did not even know where it was until today ( July 31 2009). Thanks to Ellis Adkins ( his dad bought the farm off of Guy Cooper), he gave us a tour of the farm and cemetery and filled in some interesting facts. Alonzo Cooper's farm joined the James Lewis Cooper farm, Alonzo was James's Son… : 

Tom and Donna Morton (Louise's daughter and son-in law) Cliff Hager( brother to Louise & Bonnie), Bonnie Altizer( sister to Louise & Cliff), and (Aletha) Louise Webb ( sister to Bonnie & Cliff), and Violet Cooper ( Hager) Albright( Mother and Grandmother), all pile on to Cliff's 4 wheel drive Kubota Mule to go to the Cooper Cemetery on top of the hill where their Great Grandparents ( James Lewis, and Mary (Molly ) are buried. Donna Morton is the Great , Great Grandchild Of James & Mary Cooper. This is the first time any of us have seen the cemetery, we did not even know where it was until today ( July 31 2009). Thanks to Ellis Adkins ( his dad bought the farm off of Guy Cooper), he gave us a tour of the farm and cemetery and filled in some interesting facts. Alonzo Cooper's farm joined the James Lewis Cooper farm, Alonzo was James's Son… Tom Morton, Cliff Hager, Bonnie Altizer, Donna Morton, A. Louise Webb

We Finally Found the Cooper Cemetery with the Graves of our Great Grandfather & Grandmother, James Lewis and Mary ‘Molly’ Cooper, after three trips and trucking all over the hills in Cliff’s Mule. : 

We Finally Found the Cooper Cemetery with the Graves of our Great Grandfather & Grandmother, James Lewis and Mary ‘Molly’ Cooper, after three trips and trucking all over the hills in Cliff’s Mule. James Lewis Cooper is buried at Cooper Cemetery on the Cooper farm, on a hill over looking the old farm house, the location of where James Lewis Cooper's heart resided, he loved his farm, located on Blue Lick Branch Road off 6 Mile Road in Hubball, WV. He had toiled and built this farm and cleared the land with his own two hands, a labor of love. His wife Mary ‘Molly’ E. (Nelson ) Cooper is buried in Cooper Cemetery also on the land she loved and raised her family. Mary ‘Molly’ E. Cooper James Lewis Cooper Tom & Donna Morton, Cliff Cooper-Hager, Bonnie Cooper-Hager, Louise Cooper-Hager Tom & Donna are Great, Great Grandchildren of James Lewis Cooper. Violet (Cooper) Albright Granddaughter of James & Molly Cooper

Cooper Cemetery on Blue Lick Branch Road off 6 Mile Road in Hubball, WV : 

Cooper Cemetery on Blue Lick Branch Road off 6 Mile Road in Hubball, WV We couldn’t find many inscriptions on the Headstones, but there are about 20 or more graves up on the hill on the left overlooking the Homestead of James Lewis and Mary ‘Molly’ Cooper. Louise standing next to Molly’s Grave

The first home that James Lewis Cooper built was a 2 story home, it caught on fire and was destroyed. That did not discourage James Lewis Cooper, he built a one story home in the same location, and painted it red. After James Lewis Cooper died his grandson Guy Cooper lived on the farm, and it was later sold to( Mr. Adkins) Ellis Adkins’ father, Ellis Adkins lives on the farm at this time ( July,2009) and gave us a tour of the farm and of the Cooper Cemetery .There are other neighbors and family buried at the Cooper Cemetery such as : Cooper's, Plumley’s and Stevenson's. Only a few headstones are engraved. Most of the people were very poor, during the great depression and the graves are marked with a hand cut stone and placed at the head and foot of each grave. It is a peaceful wooded setting on a hill over looking the Cooper farm. The farm is Located on Blue Lick Branch Road off of 6 Mile Road in Hubball, WV. : 

The first home that James Lewis Cooper built was a 2 story home, it caught on fire and was destroyed. That did not discourage James Lewis Cooper, he built a one story home in the same location, and painted it red. After James Lewis Cooper died his grandson Guy Cooper lived on the farm, and it was later sold to( Mr. Adkins) Ellis Adkins’ father, Ellis Adkins lives on the farm at this time ( July,2009) and gave us a tour of the farm and of the Cooper Cemetery .There are other neighbors and family buried at the Cooper Cemetery such as : Cooper's, Plumley’s and Stevenson's. Only a few headstones are engraved. Most of the people were very poor, during the great depression and the graves are marked with a hand cut stone and placed at the head and foot of each grave. It is a peaceful wooded setting on a hill over looking the Cooper farm. The farm is Located on Blue Lick Branch Road off of 6 Mile Road in Hubball, WV. Generations of Coopers since James: 1st James Cooper-deceased 2nd Elihue Cooper-deceased Generations depicted in pictures: 3rd Violet Cooper 4th Louise (Kiesel), Bonnie, & Cliff Cooper-Hager 5th Donna (Kiesel) Morton James painted his house red

Slide 80: 

James Lewis Cooper’s Obituary: Lewis Cooper, aged, highly respected and widely known citizen of Blue Lick Fork of Six Mile creek, died suddenly Monday evening about 7 o’clock at the home of a grandson following a brief illness of diarrhea. He was 76 years old. Mr. Cooper, ill only a few days, resided with his grandson, Guy Cooper. Mrs. Cooper, a granddaughter and wife of Guy Cooper, heard a struggling noise while working in the kitchen of the home. She called to the aged man but received no answer. She then called her husband. Mr. Cooper was dead when found by his grandson. Converted several years ago, Mr. Cooper took membership with the Myra Methodist Episcopal church. He was well known in his community where he had resided many years. Mrs. Cooper preceded her husband to the grave two years ago. Surviving are three sons, Alonzo Cooper, of near Hamlin, Elihue of Four Mile Creek, near Branchland and Columbus of Logan County; a daughter, Mrs. Daisy Adkins of Gill; a brother, France Cooper, 100 years old of Big Laurel Creek, near Hager and a sister, Mrs. Clara Nelson, of Valley Fork, near Griffithsville. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the residence, the W. T. Black officiating. Burial was made in the Cooper family cemetery near the home. Lincoln Republican, 17 Sep 1936, pg 1 Headstone of James Lewis Cooper located on His Farm at BlueLick Fork of Six Mile Rd.

Slide 81: 

"The Great Depression" The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn starting in most places in 1929 and ending at different times in the 1930s or early 1940s for different countries. It was the largest and most important economic depression in the 20th century, and is used in the 21st century as an example of how far the world's economy can fall. The Great Depression originated in the United States; historians most often use as a starting date the stock market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. The depression had devastating effects in virtually every country, rich or poor. International trade plunged by half to two-thirds, as did personal income, tax revenue, prices and profits. Cities all around the world were hit hard, especially those dependent on heavy industry. Construction was virtually halted in many countries. Farming and rural areas suffered as crop prices fell by roughly 60 percent. Facing plummeting demand with few alternate sources of jobs, areas dependent on primary sector industries such as farming, mining and logging suffered the most. James Lewis Cooper and wife Mary ‘Molly’ died during the great depression- The reasons for no headstones and/or small inexpensive headstones. http://history1900s.about.com/library/photos/blyindexdepression.htm

Elihue Cooper b: Mar 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WVAs/o James Lewis Cooper b: 1859, Boone Co., WV : 

Elihue Cooper b: Mar 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WVAs/o James Lewis Cooper b: 1859, Boone Co., WV Father: James Lewis Cooper b: 22 Mar 1859 in Boone County, (West) Virginia Mother: Mary 'Mollie' Ellen Nelson b: 10 Mar 1859 in Kanawha County, (West) VirginiaMarriage: Ada Priscilla Burks b: Aug. 1892 Lincoln Co. Died: 1967-buried at Franklin Cemetery, Branchland The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a couper, a cask or barrel maker or seller. Gender: Masculine Usage: English Pronounced: NEL-sən   From an English surname meaning "son of NEIL". It was originally given in honor of the British admiral Lord Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). Elihue Cooper Raised Tobacco Coal Miner & Merchant Died: 1967-Buried in Franklin Cemetery, Branchland, WV

Elihue & Ada (Burks) Cooper : 

Elihue & Ada (Burks) Cooper Ada & Elihue Cooper owned a small store next to Rt. 10 located on the right side of this picture, Building is now gone Brenda Wiley worked in the store. They Sold cigarettes, pop, candy, bread, milk, Etc. Birth Certificate of Elihue Cooper

Elihue & Ada Cooper’s Children: : 

Elihue & Ada Cooper’s Children: Pearl Cooper b: December 31, 1909 d: March 8, 1986 buried at Franklin Cemetery, Branchland, WV Gay Earl Cooper b: May 15, 1911 died: 1/31/1983 buried at Saunders Cemetery, Camp Branch Rd, Branchland, WV Clema Cooper b: October 16, 1912 died: June 30,1978 buried at Franklin Cemetery, Branchland, WV Miscarriage 1915? Verlie Cooper b: October 16, 1917 residing in Florida in 2009 Cooper Twins 1920? that died and were buried in a shoe box? Frieda Cooper b: abt. 1923 died: March 1951 buried at Roy Cemetery, Branchland WV Garnett Cooper b: Jan. 9, 1927 died: March 2007 Buried at White Chapel Cemetery, Barboursville, WV Violet “Boots” Cooper b: December 7, 1930 in Branchland, WV Residing in Huntington, WV Ray Bob Cooper b: abt.1932 in Branchland, WV died- buried in VA Edgar Cooper b: May 3,1936 at Mug Hollow off Harless Creek off 4 mile, Branchland, WV. Residing in Huntington, WV

Elihue Cooper’s Little Cherokee Indians: : 

Elihue Cooper’s Little Cherokee Indians: Pearl Gay Clema Verlie Frieda Garnet Violet Ray Bob Edgar

Elihue & Ada Burks Cooper standing with Ada’s sister, Cindy Burks Chapman & her brother, Stephan 'Steve‘ Henry Burks.Ada has three other brothers: Sanford Beverly Burks, Bennett V. Burks & William Burks. Ada’s Mom is Martha Murphy b: Aug. 6 1849 in VA (d/o Jeminah Bryant & Hiram Murphy) and her Dad’s name is James Almond 'Almon' Burks b: Sept 1849 in Virginia. The names Murphy & Bryant are also recorded on the Cherokee Surnames list. : 

Elihue & Ada Burks Cooper standing with Ada’s sister, Cindy Burks Chapman & her brother, Stephan 'Steve‘ Henry Burks.Ada has three other brothers: Sanford Beverly Burks, Bennett V. Burks & William Burks. Ada’s Mom is Martha Murphy b: Aug. 6 1849 in VA (d/o Jeminah Bryant & Hiram Murphy) and her Dad’s name is James Almond 'Almon' Burks b: Sept 1849 in Virginia. The names Murphy & Bryant are also recorded on the Cherokee Surnames list. Elihue Cooper, Cindy Burks Chapman, Ada Burks Cooper & Steve Burks Cindy (Burks) Chapman and Ada (Burks) Cooper Sisters

Elihue’s wife, Ada Cooper, and some of her Family : 

Elihue’s wife, Ada Cooper, and some of her Family Ada Priscilla (Burks) Cooper & Brother: William “Willie” Burks Ada Priscilla (Burks) Cooper Ada, Cindy & Lon Chapman Martha (Murphy) Burks Ada’s Mother Martha Burks, Ada’s mother & Ada Burks Cooper on her Father, James Almond Burks, lap (an old Tin picture)

Elihue & Ada Cooper’s Old Home Place: : 

Elihue & Ada Cooper’s Old Home Place: Elihue & Ada’s home in Branchland, WV at corner of State Rt. 10 & Camp Branch Rd. Some names of some of the people in the picture: front row: Cliff, Timothy, Jim & Mike, Gloria’s Kids, Ada, Pearl, Gloria Back rows: Edith, Jim & Mike, Tootsie, Brenda, Joan, Edgar holding Priscilla, Kermit, Walter & Garnet (Violet Cooper said she took this picture)

Slide 89: 

Grandpa Elihue owned many acres from his home on Rt. 10 all along Camp Branch road on the right side all the way to behind Camp Branch Church. Each one of his children lived along Camp Branch Road. Starting with Edgar living to the left of this house and then Clema first house going down Camp Branch then Pearl, then Gay, then Garnet, then Violet. All along the right side of the road on the side of the hill. Later Garnet sold her home on Camp Branch to Hopper and built a home on the right side of Grandpa’s house on Rt. 10. It burned down so Garnet moved to Huntington. The Family would gathered at Grandpa Elihue & Grandma Ada’s house on holidays. They had a well & outhouse (outside john) and caught rainwater to wash clothes.

Swinging Foot Bridge Remnants : 

Swinging Foot Bridge Remnants When we visited Grandma Ada Cooper, she would walk us to church over in Hubball across the Guyandotte river. She would walk us down Route 10 to a Swinging foot bridge next to a store that crossed the Guyandotte river into Hubball. Then we would walk back up the road in Hubball to the little Church of God, A Pentecostal Church. The foot bridge today is in ruin. But we took pictures of The foot bridge as it is today. We also went to Church at Camp Branch Church. Old Church of God at Hubball, now named Spirit of Hope Church. Bonnie, Louise & Cliff next to the old ruins of swinging foot bridge Example Example

Slide 91: 

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Slide 92: 

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Franklin Cemetery Branchland, WV : 

Grandma Ada Cooper and Grandpa Elihue Cooper Headstone, buried at Franklin Cemetery, Hubball/Branchland WV both died in the same year: 1967 Louise Webb & Cliff Hager (grandchildren) also own plots In Franklin Cemetery. Franklin Cemetery Branchland, WV

Slide 94: 

Pearl Cooper Holbrook Homemaker Died March 8, 1986 Mother: Ada Priscilla Burks b: 1892 in Lincoln County, WV Father: Ellihue Cooper b: March 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WV Married 1: Franklyn ‘Bonehead’ Reeves b: 1905 Coalminer d: 1960 Married 2: Don Holbrook (One King, One Faith, One Law) Irish descent. The surname of BURKS was a locational name 'the dweller by the birch trees', from residence nearby.The name was derived from the Old English word BIRC. Early records of the name mention Richard del Birkes, 1275, Wakefield, Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes was recorded in 1327 in the County of Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Pearl Mae Cooper b: December 31, 1909 in Lincoln Co., WV The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller.

Pearl Cooper Reeves Holbrook’s children: : 

Pearl Cooper Reeves Holbrook’s children: Chester Reeves-b: abt: 1928 died as baby Dolly Mae Reeves-Ramey b: 3/1/1930 in born Kistler WV; oldest grandchild of Elihue Glory Reeves-Simpkins b: 1/24/1932 born Kistler, WV. d: 12/2/2003, Frankie Delanora Reeves-Payton b: 12/31/1933 in Kistler, WV. d: 6/2/1987 Frankie Dolly Don Holbrook & Pearl Cooper Glory

Slide 96: 

Dolly Reeves & Children Glory Reeves & children Pearl Cooper Reeves Holbrook’s children & grandchildren Aunt Verlie & Uncle Arnold lived in Kistler close to Dolly and they Would go to Dolly’s house every Friday night to watch wrestling On TV.

Pearl (Cooper) (Reeves) Holbrook: : 

Pearl (Cooper) (Reeves) Holbrook: Headstone: buried Franklin Cemetery Hubball/Branchland, WV

Slide 98: 

Gay Cooper Coal Miner died: January 31, 1983 Mother: Ada Priscilla Burks b: 1892 in Lincoln County, WV Father: Ellihue Cooper b: March 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WV Married: Lula Porter on July 8, 1930 b: Aug 26, 1913d: July 13, 1992 (One King, One Faith, One Law) Irish descent. The surname of BURKS was a locational name 'the dweller by the birch trees', from residence nearby.The name was derived from the Old English word BIRC. Early records of the name mention Richard del Birkes, 1275, Wakefield, Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes was recorded in 1327 in the County of Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Gay Cooper b: May 15, 1911 in Lincoln Co., WV The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller.

Gay & Lula Cooper’s Children: : 

Gay & Lula Cooper’s Children: Children: Dallas Earl b: July 8, 1931 Cora Virginia (Genavee) b: May 30, 1933 Roy (Joe) Lee b: August 24, 1935 Raymond (Monk) Keith b: Sept. 6, 1937 Willis Gene b: March 16, 1939 Lois (Hopper) Lucille b: April 14, 1941 Barbara Janet Cooper b: Sept. 3, 1943 Thomas Gerald b: January 1, 1946 Delphia (Jitterbug) Louise b: 10/26/47 d: 11/16/1967 Wendell Paul b: April 10, 1949 Billy Bernard b: Oct. 17, 1951 –Aunt Lula’s sister raised him because Aunt Lula was very sick after having Billy. Gay & Lula Raymond “Monk” Keith Cooper 3rd Class Petty Officer Delphia “Jitterbug” Louise Cooper 1963 Graduation Picture

Some of Gay Cooper’s Family: : 

Some of Gay Cooper’s Family: Thomas & wife Barbara & Husband Joe & Wife Lula (Porter) Cooper Dallas & Thomas Lois ‘Hopper’ Cooper & husband, Kenneth

Slide 101: 

Gay Cooper’s old home place (to be torn down) On Camp Branch Road off Rt. 10 Just a little further down the road Past Clema Cooper’s place. Gay Cooper & Lula Cooper’s Headstone located at Saunders Cemetery on Camp Branch Road, off Rt. 10 Branchland, WV Louise Webb, Lois ‘Hopper’, & Bonnie Altizer Louise & Bonnie are Cousins to Lois ‘Hopper’ Cooper

Slide 102: 

Mother: Ada Priscilla Burks b: 1892 in Lincoln County, WV Father: Ellihue Cooper b: March 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WV Married: March 16, 1938 to Anna Rae Hall b: Sept. 19, 1922 from Happy Hollow, Williamson, WV (One King, One Faith, One Law) Irish descent. The surname of BURKS was a locational name 'the dweller by the birch trees', from residence nearby.The name was derived from the Old English word BIRC. Early records of the name mention Richard del Birkes, 1275, Wakefield, Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes was recorded in 1327 in the County of Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Clema ‘Pinhead’ Cooper b: Born Oct. 16, 1912 in Lincoln Co., WV The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller. Clema Cooper Retired from Kerr Glass Co, Died June 30, 1978 Raised on 4 mile Lincoln County Resided on Camp Branch Road Branchland and Altizer Ave, Huntington, WV

Clema Cooper’s Family: : 

Clema Cooper’s Family: Clema Cooper b:. Oct 16,1912 , died in Huntington, Buried in Franklin Cemetery in Branchland, WV. A coal Miner in Kistler, WV. Then got a job at Kerr glass in Huntington, WV. and retired from Kerr Glass. The family then moved from Camp Branch to Huntington, WV. Married: Anna Rae Cooper - b: Sept. 16, 1922 at Happy Hollow WV. Married : March 16, 1937. Anna Rae now (2009) widowed resides in( (Altizer) Huntington, WV. Her Children live near by. Children: Leonard Clayton Cooper( Tommy) b: Dec. 19, 1938 at Kistler, WV at home by a midwife. A note about Tommy's nick name: Edith ( Leonard's sister) could not pronounce Leonard and called him Tommy after their family dog, and it caught on with the rest of the family. Richard Gay Cooper b: April 20,1942 at Kistler WV. at home by a midwife. Richard's nick name was Dickie. Larry Glenn Cooper b: Sept 15, 1943 at Micco, WV, Logan county, WV, at home , by a midwife Edith Ann Cooper Hagley b: Feb 18 ,1945 @ Laredo, WV at home ,mid wife, lives near her Mother in Altizer, Huntington, WV. Joan Carol Cooper Adkins, Dorton, Row, b: July 7, 1946 at Laredo, WV at home by a midwife. All her husbands are dead. She is now a widow in 2009.The father of Joan's precious children are her first husband's Cedric Adkins. Marcus Jack Cooper b: March 16, 1948 on Camp Branch Rd, Branchland , WV Lincoln County, Died 2002, buried in Huntington WV. He was a postal worker in Huntington, WV. Linda Kay Cooper b: Dec 10,1950 at Camp Branch Rd, Branchland , WV, Lincoln County, at home, by a midwife Ronnie Lee Cooper b: Feb. 2, 1951 At Camp Branch Rd, in Branchland WV, Lincoln County ,at Home. by a midwife Phyllis Jean Cooper b: Feb 6, 1955 at Camp Branch Rd, Branchland, WV, Lincoln County James Douglas Cooper b:Nov.18,1959 by Dr McClellan @ McClellan Clinic in West Hamlin, WV Lincoln County. His First nick name was Jimbo, later to Jimmy. Michael Wayne Cooper b: April 22, 1961 by Dr McClellan @ McClellan Clinic , in West Hamlin , WV, Lincoln, County.

Clema Cooper & Anna Rae (Hall) Cooper: : 

Clema Cooper & Anna Rae (Hall) Cooper: Anna Rae & Clema Cooper Married: March 16, 1938 If Clema was still alive today (2009) he and Anna Rae would have been married for 71 Years.

Clema Cooper’s Family cont’d : 

Clema Cooper’s Family cont’d Leonard ‘Tommy’ Cooper 1st child Joanie & husband Larry Jackie Richard ‘Dickie’

Clema Cooper’s family cont’d: : 

Clema Cooper’s family cont’d: Back row: Larry Glenn, Ronnie Lee, Leonard Clayton (Tommy), Marcus Jack (Jackie), Richard Gay (Dickie) Middle row: Michael Wayne (Mikey) Clema, Anna Rae, James Douglas (Jimbo) Front Row: Edith Ann (Hagley), Joan Carol (Rowe), Linda Kay (Clay), Phyllis Jean (Gray).

Slide 107: 

Clema Cooper’s Old home place on right side of Camp Branch Road, off Rt. 10 Just a little ways past Edgar Cooper’s Old place. Headstone of Clema Cooper At Franklin Cemetery in Hubball, WV

Slide 108: 

Mother: Ada Priscilla Burks b: 1892 in Lincoln County, WV Father: Ellihue Cooper b: March 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WV Married: Arnold Rice b: 2/24/1918 d: 3-4-1991 Hollywood Cemetery Orange City, Florida m: 1/1935 (One King, One Faith, One Law) Irish descent. The surname of BURKS was a locational name 'the dweller by the birch trees', from residence nearby.The name was derived from the Old English word BIRC. Early records of the name mention Richard del Birkes, 1275, Wakefield, Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes was recorded in 1327 in the County of Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Verlie Cooper b: October 16, 1917 in Lincoln Co,, Slagle, WV The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller. Verlie Cooper Merchant/Store Keeper Residing in Orange City, FL

Verlie Lee (Cooper) Rice’s Family: : 

Verlie Lee (Cooper) Rice’s Family: Married: January, 1935 Husband: Arnold Newton Rice b: 2-24-1918 Crown, WV d: 3-4-1991 burial: Hollywood cemetery Orange City, FL Children: Loretta (Babb) Gay Rice b: 11-24-1935 Kistler, WV Arnold Eugene Rice ( brother) b: 7-2-1937 Kistler WV Garnita Rice ( Coffman) b: 3-23-1943 Kistler, WV Married 7/19/1969 to: Donald Curtis Coffman b: 8-30- 1943 in Charleston, WV Arnold, Verlie, Loretta, Garnita, Arnold E.

Slide 110: 

Verlie & Arnold Loretta, Verlie, Arnold Eugene, Garnita in 2008 Garnita, husband Donald and Verlie Verlie Lee Cooper Rice’s Family continued: Donald & Garnita 2007 Donald & Garnita 1993

Slide 111: 

Frieda Cooper Wiley Deceased in 1951 Buried in Roy Cemetery On Roy Branch Rd. Branchland, WV Mother: Ada Priscilla Burks b: 1892 in Lincoln County, WV Father: Ellihue Cooper b: March 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WV (One King, One Faith, One Law) Irish descent. The surname of BURKS was a locational name 'the dweller by the birch trees', from residence nearby.The name was derived from the Old English word BIRC. Early records of the name mention Richard del Birkes, 1275, Wakefield, Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes was recorded in 1327 in the County of Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Frieda Cooper b: 1923 in Lincoln Co., Branchland, WV The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller.

Frieda Cooper Wiley’s Children: : 

Frieda Cooper Wiley’s Children: Father of children: Denny Wiley Children: Kermit Gene (Wiley) Adkins b: 1947 in Branchland, WV Kermit’s dad was Denny Wiley, but since Frieda’s mother, Ada, didn’t like Denny, Frieda said Kermit belonged to Bob Adkins. He was raised by Ada Cooper after Frieda died in 1951 (this statement was made by Violet Cooper, Frieda’s sister). Brenda Joyce (Wiley) Causey b: June 10, 1949 in Branchland, WV (raised by Ada Cooper & Garnet) Brenda’s children: Robert Neal & Christopher Shawn Tootsie Marie (Wiley) (Skeens) Sheperd b: March 7, 1951 in Branchland, WV Tootsie was adopted by Garnet Cooper Skeens when Frieda died right after Tootsie was born. Brenda ‘Wiley’ Causey & Family Kermit & wife, Maudella Kermit, wife-Maudella & children

Roy Cemetery-where Frieda is buried with one of her children and her Grandfather, James Almond Burks and Grandmother, Martha (Murphy) Burks and 4 Uncles: Stephan ‘Steve’ Burks, William ‘Willie’ Burks, Bennett Burks, & Sanford ‘Bev’ Burks. The cemetery is located on Roy Branch Road, Branchland, WV. : 

Roy Cemetery-where Frieda is buried with one of her children and her Grandfather, James Almond Burks and Grandmother, Martha (Murphy) Burks and 4 Uncles: Stephan ‘Steve’ Burks, William ‘Willie’ Burks, Bennett Burks, & Sanford ‘Bev’ Burks. The cemetery is located on Roy Branch Road, Branchland, WV. Pictures of graves of Frieda and baby, and Grandmother, Grandfather and 4 uncles. Violet Cooper Albright, Sherman Albright and Donna Kiesel Morton are trying to remember where Frieda is buried and some other members of Violet’s family. Sandstone slabs are used as headstones with no names written on them Brenda (Wiley) Causey Graduation picture Kermit & Dianna Adkins wedding picture

Slide 114: 

Garnet Cooper Skeens Pentecostal Evangelist; Laundress; Homemaker; Deceased: March 5,2007 White Chapel Memorial Gardens Mother: Ada Priscilla Burks b: 1892 in Lincoln County, WV Father: Ellihue Cooper b: March 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WV Married: Walter L. Skeens b: Dec. 1st, 1915 d: May 12, 1999 (One King, One Faith, One Law) Irish descent. The surname of BURKS was a locational name 'the dweller by the birch trees', from residence nearby.The name was derived from the Old English word BIRC. Early records of the name mention Richard del Birkes, 1275, Wakefield, Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes was recorded in 1327 in the County of Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Garnet Cooper b: Jan. 9,1927 in Lincoln County, WV The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller.

Garnet Cooper’s Family: : 

Garnet Cooper’s Family: Child: Tootsie Marie (Wiley) Skeens Sheperd b: March 7, 1951 Tootsie was adopted by Garnet Cooper Skeens when Frieda died right after Tootsie was born. Tootsie’s children: Robert Sexton and Steven Sexton Violet ‘Boots’ (Cooper) (Hager) Albright & Garnet (Cooper) Skeens, Violet visited Garnet frequently when Garnet was in the Nursing home before she died-close sisters. Tootsie Walter & Garnet Skeens with one of Tootsie’s children Garnet & Walter’s Home on Richmond St. Guyandotte, Huntington

Garnett (Cooper) Skeens’ Obituary: : 

Garnett (Cooper) Skeens’ Obituary: MRS. GARNETT SKEENS (Mar 05, 2007) MRS. GARNETT SKEENS, 80, of Huntington, widow of Walter L. Skeens, died Monday in Huntington Health and Rehab. Funeral services will be conducted at 11 a.m. Thursday at Chapman's Mortuary, Huntington; burial will be in White Chapel Memorial Gardens, Barboursville. She is survived by two daughters, Tootsie Shepherd of Ironton and Brenda Causey of Daytona, Fla.; two sisters, Boots Albright of Huntington and Verlie Rice of Florida; a brother, Edgar Cooper of Huntington, and two grandchildren, Robert Sexton and Steven Sexton, both of Huntington. Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home. Veteran’s War Memorial Section of White Chapel Memorial Gardens (left side)

Slide 117: 

Violet ‘Boots’ (Cooper) (Hager) Albright Occupation: Seamstress Retired from Corbin’s Clothing Mfg. Co. Residing in Huntington, WV Mother: Ada Priscilla Burks b: 1892 in Lincoln County, WV Father: Ellihue Cooper b: March 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WV Married 1: Albert M. Hager in 1948 divorced in 1966 Married 2: Sherman Albright in 1967 (One King, One Faith, One Law) Irish descent. The surname of BURKS was a locational name 'the dweller by the birch trees', from residence nearby.The name was derived from the Old English word BIRC. Violet ‘Boots’ Cooper b: December 7, 1930 in Lincoln Co., WV The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller.

Violet ‘Boots’ Cooper through the ages : 

Violet ‘Boots’ Cooper through the ages 1938 1947 1944 1990’s 2009 1960’s 1980’s 1950’s

Violet Cooper and family lived on Mug Hollow Road off of Harless Fork Road in Branchland WV prior to moving to Camp Branch Road on State Route 10. The old barn is still standing, but the log house burned down and has been replaced by a more modern home. : 

Violet Cooper and family lived on Mug Hollow Road off of Harless Fork Road in Branchland WV prior to moving to Camp Branch Road on State Route 10. The old barn is still standing, but the log house burned down and has been replaced by a more modern home. The old barn is all that is left of the Farm on Mug Hollow off Harless Fork ,of 4 mile Road in Branchland WV, that Elihue Cooper owned and his daughter and our Mom ( Violet Cooper Albright ) was raised until she was 15 y/o they moved to corner of Camp Branch & Rt. 10. This is the Old Barn that is still standing (barely). Violet Cooper at around 14 when she Lived at this location Violet Cooper When she was About 9 years old

Bonnie and Louise visiting the old log 4 Mile Church in Branchland, WV where their mother Violet Cooper (Hager) Albright went to as a child: : 

Bonnie and Louise visiting the old log 4 Mile Church in Branchland, WV where their mother Violet Cooper (Hager) Albright went to as a child: The Church is located on Harless Fork Road off of 4 Mile Road. Violet said she went to church there all the time. She said they did not care who preached there. She does not remember what denomination it is. She said they shouted and Sang and had evangelistic preaching. She said she would walk to Sunday School and Church with others in her family. They moved from Six mile in Hubball where she was born to ‘Mug’ Hallow (Holler) where she was raised until She was about 15 years old. This Church is located About a mile or two from their home on Mug Hollow Rd.

Slide 121: 

Camp Branch Church on Camp Branch Road off State Route 10. Behind the Church was the Property of Albert Hager and Violet ‘Boots’ Cooper. Albert and Violet bought the property from Violet’s Dad, Elihue. Most of his children lived on Camp Branch. The church built bathrooms right in the middle of the drive way that went to their property behind the church. It caused quite a feud with Albert and the church. The church put a road around behind the church and down the left side of the church, but the road was not travelable. It was narrow, steep, and stayed washed out next to the creek that ran on the left side of the church. Albert & Violet did not have the money to fight the offense in court. Later someone burned down their little home that was on the hill behind the church. 1st Home & Feud with Camp Branch Church Cousins: Louise ‘Cooper-Hager’ Webb, Lois ‘Hopper’ Cooper, Bonnie ‘Cooper-Hager’ Altizer Standing in front of the “offending” bathrooms that were built on Albert’s & Violet’s Driveway Louise and Albert Hager On the porch Of their little House on the Hill behind The church.

Albert & Violet (Cooper) Hager Family History-Short Story by Aletha Louise (Hager) Webb & Bonnie (Hager) Altizer : 

Albert & Violet (Cooper) Hager Family History-Short Story by Aletha Louise (Hager) Webb & Bonnie (Hager) Altizer In 1948, Albert and Violet started their lives on Camp Branch Road off Route 10 in Branchland, WV. They bought 19 acres from Violet’s father & mother, Elihue & Ada Cooper, built their first little two-room-home (which was later burned down by vandals) and had their first 3 children, Louise, Bonnie & Judy. Louise was delivered by Dr. McClellan and Bonnie & Judy were delivered by Albert’s mother, Letha Hager, the local midwife. She delivered a lot of babies in the Lincoln County area during the 1940’s & 50’s. Dr. McClellan’s dad was the local postman in Branchland and delivered the mail by horse and buggy to the family and they called him “Uncle Bob.” Albert worked in the coal mines at Mud Fork & Freeze Fork, Lincoln County, WV where the family rented a home for a while. He was injured in a cave-in at the mine and received a broken arm and in 1952 he decided to leave the mines and move to Millersburg, Ohio where his brother Arthur lived and went to work in a steel plant. Afterwards, Albert & Violet moved their family to Cleveland on Euclid Avenue and he obtained employment at the Ford Motor Company Brook Park Division. Albert wanted to get out of the city so in 1955 he moved his family to Erhart, Medina County, Ohio where Albert continued to work at Ford Motor Company & they had 2 more children, Cliff & Timothy. Violet ran a little general store with a gas station but she was not a good manager because she was too soft hearted and gave away too much merchandise which caused the store to be unprofitable. In 1961, they decided to buy a small truck farm (8 acres) at Litchfield, OH and had their last child, Priscilla. Violet worked at the Latex Rubber Plant at Lodi and Albert continued to work at the Ford Motor Company. One of his hobbies (besides fox hunting) was taking flying lessons and he became a pilot and would fly piper cub airplanes. He took each of us kids flying over Lake Erie. Also during this period of time, Aletha Louise married Kenneth Kiesel and moved to Lakehurst, NJ. In 1966 after 18 years of marriage, Albert & Violet divorced and Violet & children moved to Huntington, WV to be close to her family. Violet married Sherman Albright and went to work at Corbin Coat Factory. Albert married Tillie and had a child, Leonard, then divorced and he married Donna, moved to Millwood, OH, went to work in a glass mfg. plant and had 2 more children, Albert, & Mark. Later, Louise & Kenneth moved to Proctorville, OH across the river from Huntington, WV. After retirement, Albert moved to Huntington, WV to be near his children. Soon after, Albert II & Mark moved to the Huntington area to be near family. In 2000, Albert married Naolmi and in 2006 he died at his camper on Route 2 at the River’s Edge campground. He died doing what he loved to do-camping out on the river bank. He was buried a Rome Cemetery, Proctorville, OH. Violet retired from Corbin’s after working there for many years. She & Sherman bought a home on West Road. In 2009, Violet and Sherman still live in their little home at 1882 West Road, Huntington, WV enjoying attending Cliff’s church-Deliverance Tabernacle next door. Uncle Bob McClellan, local postman Louise on Birthday bike & Bonnie at rented home in Freeze Fork coal mine town Corbin Coat/Clothing Factory on Vernon St Huntington, WV

Life in Ohio“A lifetime of memories” : 

Life in Ohio“A lifetime of memories” The Old Store Mom ran in Erhart (Ashley Morton Nichols (GGC) is pictured) Our Old House in Erhart Our Old House in Litchfield, now Lodi Hospital where Cliff, Tim, & Pris were born delivered by Dr. Shrier Litchfield Elementary School where Louise, Bonnie, Judy and Cliff attended Buckeye High School where Louise, Bonnie, & Judy Went to high school (Aletha Louise is pictured) Our Old House in Litchfield, then (Aletha Louise Hager is pictured)

Violet ‘Boots’ (Cooper) (Hager) Albright’s Children: : 

Violet ‘Boots’ (Cooper) (Hager) Albright’s Children: Father of Children: Albert Minuard Hager b: May 23, 1926 Children: Aletha Louise Hager b: April 27, 1948 in Lincoln Co. Branchland, WV Bonnie Lou Hager b: March 4, 1950 in Lincoln Co. Branchland, WV Judy Ann Hager b: December 1, 1951 in Lincoln Co. Branchland, WV Cliff Allen Hager b: June 12, 1957 in Medina Co. Lodi, Ohio Timothy Wayne Hager b: April 24, 1960 in Medina Co. Lodi, Ohio Priscilla Jean Hager b: August 20, 1962 in Medina Co. Lodi, Ohio Adopted Father of Child: Sherman Albright b: December 25, 1937 Child: Christopher Edmond (Hager) Albright b: March 12, 1982 in Huntington, WV (Priscilla’s son, Christopher, was adopted by his Grandmother, Violet Cooper (Hager) Albright & her husband Sherman Albright Violet & Sherman Albert & Violet

Violet “Boots” Cooper’s Family: : 

Violet “Boots” Cooper’s Family: Violet & Her mother, Ada Cooper Violet & her Husband, Sherman Albright m: July 2, 1967 Priscilla, Timothy, Cliff, Judy, Bonnie, A. Louise Children: 2008 Sherman & Violet Albright’s Homeplace 1882 West Rd. Huntington, WV Their Home (Violet & Sherman on porch) Sherman & Violet’s Wedding Day Sherman, Garnet, Violet, Priscilla

Albert Hager & Violet Cooper’s Children: : 

Albert Hager & Violet Cooper’s Children: Aletha Louise (Hager) (Kiesel) Webb Bonnie Lou (Hager) Altizer Judy Ann (Hager) (Albright) Altizer Cliff Allen Hager Priscilla Jean (Hager) (Basenback) Lawson Timothy Wayne Hager

Albert Hager & Violet (Cooper) Albright’s Grandchildren: : 

Albert Hager & Violet (Cooper) Albright’s Grandchildren: Donna (Kiesel) Morton Kennette (Kiesel) Wright Billy (Hager) McCallister Danielle Hager Terra (Albright) Martin Stephanie Basenback Desiree’ Hager Brayden Hager Michael (Hager) Hart Lora Altizer Anita Albright Cindy Altizer Sims Kenneth Kiesel Christopher (Hager) Albright (Adopted by his grandmother Violet)

Albert Hager & Violet Cooper’s Great Grandchildren: : 

Albert Hager & Violet Cooper’s Great Grandchildren: Ashley Morton Kendra Luff Lily Hager Caleb McCallister Brittany Kiesel Courtney Kiesel Cody Kiesel Taylor Altizer Jessica Altizer-Barr Madison Martin Megan Wallace Carey Wright Whitney Kipp Timothy Basenback Kenneth Kiesel

Violet Cooper Hager Albright’s Grandchildren & Great Grandchildren from her daughter, Aletha Louise (Hager) (Kiesel) Webb: : 

Violet Cooper Hager Albright’s Grandchildren & Great Grandchildren from her daughter, Aletha Louise (Hager) (Kiesel) Webb: Kenneth Wayne Kiesel (Grandchild) Ashley & Zac Nichols Donna & Tom Morton Courtney Whitney Kendra Wayne Wright Carey Kennette Brittney Kiesel Kenneth Wayne Kiesel Tina Cody Courtney Kenneth Jr. Aletha Louise & husband, Gary Webb

Violet Cooper Hager Albright’s Grandchildren & Great Grandchildren from her daughter, Bonnie Lou (Hager) Altizer: : 

Violet Cooper Hager Albright’s Grandchildren & Great Grandchildren from her daughter, Bonnie Lou (Hager) Altizer: .. Jessica Barr Grandchild (Lora’s Daughter) Taylor Altizer Grandchild (Cindy’s Son) Bonnie (Hager) Altizer Paul Altizer Bonnie’s Husband Cindy Altizer Sims Child Lora Altizer (Barr) Child Justin Sims, Kenneth Sims, Cindy (Altizer) Sims, & Taylor Altizer Jessica Altizer-Barr & Taylor Altizer 2004

Violet Cooper Hager Albright’s Grandchildren & Great Grandchildren from her daughter, Judy Ann (Hager) (Albright) Altizer: : 

Violet Cooper Hager Albright’s Grandchildren & Great Grandchildren from her daughter, Judy Ann (Hager) (Albright) Altizer: Madison Martin Grandchild Judy Ann Megan Wallace Grandchild Anita Albright Terra Albright (Wallace) Martin Clarence Anita Terra Judy Back: Mike (Terra’s husband), Megan, Tanner (stepson) Front: Terra, Madison, Taryn (Stepdaughter)

Slide 132: 

The children: Willis (Andy) Tackett Anita (Tackett) (Spears) Blankenship Kenneth Tackett Danielle Hager The grandchildren: Cory Lee Spears Brianna Spears Maddi Blankenship Summer Tackett Libertee Tackett Hayden Tackett Peyton Tackett Kohen Tackett Lily Grace Hager Cliff & Vivian Violet Cooper Albright’s Grandchildren and Great Grandchildren from her son, Cliff Allen Hager:

Violet Cooper Albright’s Grandchildren and Great Grandchild from her son, Timothy Wayne Hager: : 

Violet Cooper Albright’s Grandchildren and Great Grandchild from her son, Timothy Wayne Hager: Billy Caleb Tim Michael Desiree’ & Brayden Brayden, Tim, Lynette, Desiree’ 2009

Violet Cooper Hager Albright’s Grandchildren and Great Grandchild from her daughter, Priscilla (Hager) (Basenback) Lawson’s Children: : 

Violet Cooper Hager Albright’s Grandchildren and Great Grandchild from her daughter, Priscilla (Hager) (Basenback) Lawson’s Children: Christopher Priscilla Stephanie TJ - 2009 Stephanie & TJ 2009 Christopher, Priscilla, Stephanie Pris & Timothy James ‘TJ’ 2008 Chris in 1988 Stephanie in 1988 Chris 2009

White Chapel Memorial GardensGarden of the Old Rugged Cross Section : 

White Chapel Memorial GardensGarden of the Old Rugged Cross Section Location of where Violet Cooper and Sherman Albright have their Grave Sites at Barboursville, WV

Slide 136: 

Ray Bob Cooper Mechanic Buried in Virginia No children Mother: Ada Priscilla Burks b: 1892 in Lincoln County, WV Father: Ellihue Cooper b: March 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WV Married: Mabel (One King, One Faith, One Law) Irish descent. The surname of BURKS was a locational name 'the dweller by the birch trees', from residence nearby.The name was derived from the Old English word BIRC. Early records of the name mention Richard del Birkes, 1275, Wakefield, Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes was recorded in 1327 in the County of Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Ray Bob Cooper b: 1932 in Lincoln Co., Branchland, WV The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller.

Slide 137: 

Edgar Cooper Retired from Kerr Glass Co. Residing at 1839 West Rd. in Huntington, WV Mother: Ada Priscilla Burks b: 1892 in Lincoln County, WV Father: Ellihue Cooper b: March 4, 1887 in Lincoln County, WV Wife: Clodine Albright b: April 24, 1936 Logan Co., WV Married: 5/10/1936 at Pleasant View, WV at Preacher John Butcher’s home. (One King, One Faith, One Law) Irish descent. The surname of BURKS was a locational name 'the dweller by the birch trees', from residence nearby.The name was derived from the Old English word BIRC. Early records of the name mention Richard del Birkes, 1275, Wakefield, Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes was recorded in 1327 in the County of Yorkshire. Johannes del Byrkes of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Edgar Cooper b: May 3, 1936 in Mug Hollow Rd. off Harless Creek Rd, off 4 Mile Rd., Lincoln Co., Branchland,WV The name Cooper derives from the English surname, which originated as an occupation name for someone who was a cooper, a cask or barrel maker or seller.

Edgar Cooper’s Family: : 

Edgar Cooper’s Family: Edgar & Clodine Besides working for Kerr Glass, Edgar had a very Successful Automotive parts business Located in Altizer Addition, Huntington,WV. Edgar & Clodine's old home place Used to sit in the same location as this double wide mobile home, at the corner of Camp Branch Road & Rt. 10 just left of Elihue’s (his dad’s) place on Rt. 10. They moved into Huntington at 1839 West Road. Edgar moved with his parents to Camp Branch Road from Mug Hollow Road, 4 Mile area, when he was about 10 years old.

Uncle Edgar & Aunt Clodine (Albright) Cooper : 

Uncle Edgar & Aunt Clodine (Albright) Cooper At home - 1839 West Road year 2009 Pictured is Edgar & Clodine’s home At 1839 West Road. They live Down the road from Violet ‘Boots’ (Cooper) Albright, Edgar’s Sister, and Sherman Albright, who is Clodine’s brother & Violet’s husband.