Camping Merit Badge (Eagle)

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This PPT is for Merit Badge Instructors to use for teaching, download and make any changes you need to fit your class, leave a commit. - Full Permission - If you can not download, email me bsagptx@yahoo.com and i'll send it to you.

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1.Do the following a. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in camping activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards b. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while camping, including hypothermia, frostbite, heat reactions, dehydration, altitude sickness, insect stings, tick bites, snakebite, blisters, and hyperventilation. 2. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. Write a personal and group plan for implementing these principles on your next outing.. 3. Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot using a topographical map and compass OR a topographical map and a GPS receiver. 4. Do the following: a. Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member. b. Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout, including creating the duty roster, menu planning, equipment needs, general planning, and setting up camp. 5. Do the following: a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term "layering." b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet. c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding). d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed. e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout. 6. Do the following: a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent. b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water. c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent. d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. M ake a comfortable ground bed.

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7. Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following: a. Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed. b. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness. 8. Do the following: a. Explain the safety procedures for: 1. Using a propane or butane/propane stove 2. Using a liquid fuel stove 3. Proper storage of extra fuel b. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves. c. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination. d. Cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove. 9. Show experience in camping by doing the following: a. Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events. One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent. b. On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision: 1. Hike up a mountain, gaining at least 1,000 vertical feet. 2. Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles. 3. Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours. 4. Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles. 5. Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience. 6. Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more. c. Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency. 10. Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety, survival, public health, conservation, and good citizenship. In your discussion, tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics.

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1.Do the following a. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in camping activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards b. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while camping, including hypothermia, frostbite, heat reactions, dehydration, altitude sickness, insect stings, tick bites, snakebite, blisters, and hyperventilation.

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1.Do the following a. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in camping activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards b. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while camping, including hypothermia, frostbite, heat reactions, dehydration, altitude sickness, insect stings, tick bites, snakebite, blisters, and hyperventilation.

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Show your work

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2. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. Write a personal and group plan for implementing these principles on your next outing.. 1 of 3

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2 of 3 The Principles of Leave No Trace 1. Plan Ahead and Prepare 2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces 3. Dispose of Waste Properly (Pack It In, Pack It Out) 4. Leave What You Find 5. Minimize Campfire Impacts 6. Respect Wildlife 7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors 2. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. Write a personal and group plan for implementing these principles on your next outing..

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3 of 3 2. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. Write a personal and group plan for implementing these principles on your next outing.. As an American, I will do my best to - Be clean in my outdoor manners. Be careful with fire. Be considerate in the outdoors. Be conservation minded.

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3. Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot using a topographical map and compass OR a topographical map and a GPS receiver.

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4. Do the following: a. Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member. b. Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout, including creating the duty roster, menu planning, equipment needs, general planning, and setting up camp.

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4. Do the following: a. Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member. b. Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout, including creating the duty roster, menu planning, equipment needs, general planning, and setting up camp.

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5. Do the following: a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term "layering." b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet. c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding). d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed. e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout. 1 of 5 Step 1 Put on a base layer. The base layer is the layer next to your skin, and its purpose is to wick sweat and moisture away from the skin. "Your base layer is usually some form of long underwear," says Ken Taylor, operations Manager for Hermit's Hut in Redding, California. "A long-sleeve shirt, pants and socks." Since its main purpose is to transfer moisture away from the skin and evaporate it, use a quick-drying material. Polypropeline or merino wool fabrics wick away sweat and feel soft against the skin, and wool provides the added benefit of odor resistance. Make sure that your socks are made of similar wicking material to keep your feet dry. Step 2 Put on the mid-layer, or insulating layer. "The mid-layer is thicker than the base; it provides insulation by trapping heat to keep you warm," Taylor says. Merino wool or synthetic fleece is generally ideal, as it effectively retains heat (even when it is wet) and it transfers moisture well. Down materials will also work, but it has a tendency to dry slowly. Step 3 Put on the outer layer, also known as the outer shell, for its weather-blocking abilities. "Your outer layer will be the waterproof jacket and pants to keep external moisture away from your body to keep you dry," Taylor says. Ideally, the shell layer will be made up of a material that is breathable as well as waterproof. Waterproof/breathable materials are able to block out snow and rain, y et allow evaporated moisture (such as sweat) out from the garment .

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5. Do the following: a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term "layering." b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet. c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding). d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed. e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout. 2 of 5 If day hikes and short backpacking trips are the highlight of your summer plans, reviews point to the Merrell Moab Ventilator (available in both men's and women's sizes) as the best lightweight, low-cut hiking shoe. As… expandthe name suggests, the non-waterproof version of this shoe has a highly breathable mesh-and-leather body that isn't suited for winter use Reviewers say the Gore-Tex XCR waterproof membrane in the Vasque Breeze breathes better than a standard Gore-Tex lining. Many owners say the boots are comfortable from the first day, and provide good ankle protection and… expandsupport for not only a day hike but also backpacking with loads up to about 30 pounds. the Hi-Tec Altitude IV WP for men , This boot doesn't have a waterproof lining but the leather upper is… expand water resistant, and most owners say their feet stay dry. In fact, some experts prefer leather uppers over a waterproof lining because the leather does a better job of letting sweat escape. The Altitude IV WP draws repeated praise for excellent traction on wet surfaces.

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5. Do the following: a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term "layering." b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet. c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding). d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed. e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout. 3 of 5 Caring for Your Camping Tent Roll out your tent, wash down the inside and out with a mild soap and inspect the seams and fabric for weaknesses and tears. Cleaning and Storing Camping Stoves, Grills, and Lanterns Thoroughly clean your camping stoves, grills, and lanterns before putting them away. Use warm water and a mild dish soap. Disassemble the items as needed to clean away all grease and food debris in your stove or insects and other debris that may be trapped in your camping lantern. Proper Care of Sleeping Bags Most sleeping bags are machine washable and can be tumble dried on low. Wash your sleeping bag in warm water with a mild detergent in a commercial washer with a drum, using the gentle cycle. Rinse cold and add a liquid fabric softener. You can also hand wash your sleeping bag in the bath tub using a mild detergent. Tumble dry the sleeping bag on low or let it air dry. Make sure the sleeping bag is completely dry before rolling it up. Avoid storing your sleeping bag in a stuff sack or other constrictive pack for long periods.

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5. Do the following: a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term "layering." b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet. c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding). d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed. e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout. 4 of 5 A pocket knife - can come in handy in a wide variety of situations. It is useful for tasks as large as building an emergency shelter or lighting a campfire with poor fuel, or as small as repairing a damaged backpack. A first aid kit can be a lifesaver. A basic kit for first aid might include adhesive bandages, medical tape, sterile gauze, moleskin, soap, antiseptic, a mouth-barrier device for CPR, and scissors. Extra clothing to match the weather. Multiple layers are superior to a single massive jacket, because layered clothing is adaptable to a wide range of temperatures. Rain gear is very important. Being wet from rain may result in hypothermia, a potentially fatal condition. A flashlight is, of course, important for finding one's way at night. Trail food is good for maintaining your energy. However, the human body can reportedly survive for weeks without food, so starving to death should be the least of your worries if you become lost in the wilderness. Water is probably the most important of the Essentials. Dehydration may develop into heat exhaustion and heatstroke. The human body may only survive for a few days without water. Matches and or a firestarter may be used to light fires for heat, or for signalling purposes. Sun protection may include sunblock , sunglasses, lip balm and a wide-brimmed hat. Used properly, it will prevent sunburn and possibly heat exhaustion. Trail maps and compass are probably the most important tools one can carry in case of getting lost.

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5. Do the following: a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term "layering." b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet. c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding). d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed. e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout. 5 of 5

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6. Do the following: a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent. b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water. c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent. d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed. 1 of 5 A-Frame Tents A-frame tents look just like the classic pup tent, sporting a triangular support on either end. The resulting tent looks like a triangular prism sitting flat on one long side. You may also find A-frame tents with a ridgepole between the two end supports and a center hoop to create a roomier interior. Pyramid Tents Pyramid tents look like exactly what the name suggests. A single central pole--some hikers may substitute a hiking pole, walking stick or even a convenient branch for an actual tent pole--supports the center of the tent. The tent fabric then falls away on all sides. Hoop Tents A series of parallel hoops with fabric stretched over them give a hoop tent its characteristic shape. The tent may have one to three hoops of varying sizes. If the tent is set up with two intersecting hoops that cross instead of sitting parallel, forming a tall, skinny "X" with a rectangular footprint, it's referred to as a wedge tent. Dome Tents Dome tents are complex hoop tents, usually made up of four or more hoops that criss -cross over the middle of the tent. There may be another smaller hoop to create a freestanding tent entrance or vestibule. Dome tents are very strong and readily withstand inclement conditions, but the intersecting poles can make them difficult to set up. If you have a tent supported by two hoops that cross in the middle--like the wedge tent, but creating a square "X" footprint instead of a rectangle--it is technically a dome tent, too. Two-hoop or "square" dome tents aren't as sturdy than their more complex cousins. Whatever type of tent you choose to take camping there are some factors that you should always consider: Size – Make sure the tent is big enough and there is plenty of space to sleep comfortably and stow your gear. Material – Polyester withstands extended exposure to the sun; Nylon is lighter weight; Canvas is durable but very heavy Weather – Ensure the tent is suited to the weather conditions you may be faced with, that it is fully waterproof and the rain fly provides complete coverage. A porch is a good idea to keep wet items out of the main tent. Strength – Sturdy tent poles and pegs, double sewn seams, well secured fastenings and heavy duty zippers help to ensure the durability of your tent. Setup – Can you set the tent up easily or does it have adequate instructions? Features – Ventilation to lesson condensation, window and door mesh to keep out bugs.

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Three-Season Tents Three-season tents are good, general purpose tents. Most camping situations (unless you plan to camp in serious winter weather) generally require a three-season tent. They are designed perfectly for spring, summer, and fall. This means that they provide adequate protection in all weather conditions except in extreme snowfall or wind; the tent’s poles are not designed to support the weight of snow. Although the three-season tent is heavier than, say, a family or cabin tent, they are less expensive, lighter (4-10 pounds) and more compact (3-5 feet tall at peak). For these reasons, and for their seasonal versatility, this type of tent is popular with backpackers, hikers, cyclists and paddlers; they are just as great for recreational camping, too. Such tents offer excellent ventilation. Many have more open and zipped panels, as well as mesh inner bodies which help to greatly reduce condensation. Without a fly, the three-season becomes cooler – while still remaining bug-proof – on hot nights. Some types of three-season tents include tarp tents (minimalist shelter helps keep rain off of you and your sleeping bag, but bottoms are open); tunnel/hoop tents (narrow in shape, light due to less poles and fabrics, but not too strong). Four-Season Tents Four-season tents include winter camping. If you plan to camp in extreme weather, a four-season tent is best. As they cover all the seasons, four-season tents are the most versatile of all tents. They are generally smaller tents, meant for 1-4 people. Meant to protect campers in heavy weather, the four-seasons are usually more weather-proof and are made with heavier fabrics that have thick, waterproof coating. The tents are built low and have vertical or curved walls (3-5 feet tall at peak) to shed snow and large vestibules for cooking and storage. Because their flies generally reach the ground, the four-seasons are less ventilated and so more likely to have interior condensation. Although the four-seasons do have a greater weight (4-15 pounds) and pack size than the three-season tents, they are easy to use and you may find that the added versatility makes up for the extra weight. Just remember that four season tents are still not intended for the even more extreme conditions of mountaineering.

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Mountaineering Tents A mountaineering tent is sometimes called a “fifth season” camping tent. They are designed specifically for harsh conditions (in higher altitudes, along cliffs/mountains, etc.). Designed to be as light as possible, mountaineering tents do not have the space that is found in regular-sized tents. They have lower profiles, larger and thicker aluminium poles and increased use of guy points. Mountaineering tents are manufactured and shaped to shed snow and to remain resistant to strong winds. These are not built for comfort or recreational camping. Backpacking Tents For backpackers, the weight of their tent is one of the most important factors. As the tent will most likely be carried on their backs, backpackers require a tent that is lightweight while still meeting their specific needs. This often means that size, and thus roominess, is sacrificed. Depending on the weather conditions you plan to backpack in, a three-season tent or a solid and lightweight four-season tent are suitable. Just make sure that the tent is high quality, able to withstand any rough weather you might encounter. If there are two of you backpacking, one tent should be enough between you. However, if you have a larger group, it may be easier to bring along a few smaller tents, rather than one large, heavy and bulky one. Of course, you could always distribute the pieces of a larger tent amongst group members. Some types of backpacking tents include bivy sacks/shelters, camping hammocks, and sleep screen. Bivy sacks are small shelters (.5-3 pounds, 1.5-3.5 feet high) for minimalist campers. They are made to fit you and your tent, but little else. Camping hammocks are combinations between hammocks and tents and extremely light. Sleep screens are also minimalist, lightweight and designed for warm weather. Mesh helps to keep the bugs away, but not rain.

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Dome Tents Dome tents are very popular. They are great as three-season or summer/family tents and less expensive than cabin tents. Though small, they are very stable (not to mention strong with aluminium poles) and offer a nice amount of headroom. Dome-shaped, dome tents are made to shed snow and rain; they resist wind well with the aid of a rain-fly. Dome tents are rather easy to put up with their free-standing design; they don’t require guy lines or tent stakes to remain upright (although they are needed to keep from blowing away!). Convertible Tents Convertible camping tents can convert from a four-season tent to a three-season. To do this you must remove the tent cover, a couple of the poles and open the zippered windows for ventilation. Standard weight is usually 5-12 pounds and peak height 3.5-5 feet. Single Wall Tents Single wall tents are less bulky and heavy (their design doesn’t include flies making their weight closer to that of bivy sacks) than four-season tents. Single wall tents are made of waterproof, breathable material which means that they function best in cool and dry conditions, above snowline. Bear in mind that they do not do as well in high humidity or heat of summer or sea level. Screen Tents Screen tents have mesh sides to keep away insects, but their tops are waterproof to withstand wind and rain. These tents are great because of their high visibility which allows you to enjoy your surroundings.

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6. Do the following: a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent. b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water. c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent. d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed. 2 of 5 E. coli from tainted meat is avoidable if proper food handling and cooking practices are followed. Norovirus related illnesses are a bit more difficult to avoid once an outbreak begins as the virus is very difficult to eliminate from the environment. Food handling is a definite concern with norovirus but proper sanitation is paramount to avoiding infection.

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Wash pot: contains hot water with a few drops of biodegradable soap Hot-rinse pot: clear, hot water. Cold-rinse pot: cold water with a tiny splash of bleach or similar substance to kill bacteria Dispose of the dirty dish water by first running a strainer through it, thoroughly, to remove all of the food particles. Scrape plates and pans before washing. Wipe them clean to get most of the food particles off of them. This will keep your wash water from getting too dirty, too fast. Carry the water 200 feet (60 m) away from your campsite and any water sources, and fling it out in a widespread area, or pour it in the fire pit if you have one. Take the strainer and empty it into a bag that you will pack and carry out with you.

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6. Do the following: a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent. b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water. c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent. d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed. 3 of 5 Choose a level and shaded site- both from wind and sun The site should have good drainage in case of wet weather Ensure there are no rocks or roots on the ground where your tent will sit Are you close enough to a water supply? Is the site large enough to meet your needs and not too close to anyone else? If you have one, can you park your vehicle close by? If there are restrooms facilities, are they within a reasonable distance Consider the layout: Where to cook? Wash up? Eat? Light a fire?

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6. Do the following: a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent. b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water. c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent. d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed. 4 of 5 The benefits of an external-frame pack are: 1.you can carry heavy loads more easily with an external frame pack; 2. packing is easier in external frame packs as they are more forgiving and can carry awkward loads more easily; 3. external-framed backpacks tend to last longer; 4. external-framed backpacks are less expensive than most similarly sized internal-framed backpacks; 5. external-framed backpacks are great for kids and young adults, who are likely starting out and doing so on relatively easy terrain, as the packs are tough and handle awkward loads better. The benefits of internal-frame backpacks are: 1. they don't alter backpacker's center of balance 2. they don't have trail clearance issues as they sit low and close to the backpaker's body; 3. they lighter weight; 4. they provide more flexibility and versatility; 5. there is a huge variety of sizes and styles; 6. they are highly adjustable

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6. Do the following: a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent. b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water. c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent. d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed. 5 of 5 Rectangle – the sleeping bag we were probably all raised with.   This is a basic rectangle and rolls up to about the size of a small car.   Only use these in the summer, and only if you can drive directly to your camping site.   The upside of these bags is they provide lots of room for your feet, and can be zipped together for Mom and Pop sleeping.   They are often thick too, which will help to cushion you from the hard ground.   Barrel – The barrel sleeping bag is slightly oval shaped, which provides more body warmth.   It is roomier than a mummy bag, but does not usually come with a hood like the mummy.   Mummy – The mummy sleeping bag is what you need when camping in cold weather.   It tapers as it goes down toward your feet, providing a close fit and therefore trapping body heat.   It has a hood that wraps around your head and neck, keeping your body heat inside the bag.   The mummy has draft tubes, which are filled fabric strips sewn along the zipper, keeping your bag draft free.   The downside is only for those who have claustrophobia and may feel trapped inside this tighter fitting bag.  

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7. Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following: a. Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed. b. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness.

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7. Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following: a. Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed. b. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness.

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8. Do the following: a. Explain the safety procedures for: 1. Using a propane or butane/propane stove 2. Using a liquid fuel stove 3. Proper storage of extra fuel b. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves. c. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination. d. Cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove. Unsafe fuel storage puts your health and safety at risk. It can also affect everyone around you. Fuel spills can contaminate the surrounding soil, wells and groundwater. The contamination can spread to sicken humans and animals who come in contact with it. Vapors from improperly stored gasoline and kerosene are dangerous to inhale and fatal in enclosed spaces such as a garage or basement. Fire and explosions can also be triggered by unsafe fuel storage.

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8. Do the following: a. Explain the safety procedures for: 1. Using a propane or butane/propane stove 2. Using a liquid fuel stove 3. Proper storage of extra fuel b. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves. c. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination. d. Cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove. Solid Fuel Solid fuel stoves run on gel alcohol or hex blocks. The fuel is small, Inexpensiveand easy to transport, but it can be difficult to find and burns slowly. Unpressurized Liquid Stoves Unpressurized liquid stoves use methanol. These stoves are easy to operate, require little maintenance and have cheap fuel, but they also burn inefficiently and can leak fuel. Pressurized Liquid Stoves Pressurized liquid stoves use Coleman fuel, paraffin or gasoline for fuel. The fuel is easy to obtain and burns efficiently, but it is prone to leaking and can flare during cooking, potentially burning the cook and ruining the food. Gas Stoves Gas stoves run on cylinders of compressed gas, such as propane. They are cheap to use and maintain and light to carry, but the fuel can be difficult to find, especially if you are traveling somewhere remote or out of the country.

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8. Do the following: a. Explain the safety procedures for: 1. Using a propane or butane/propane stove 2. Using a liquid fuel stove 3. Proper storage of extra fuel b. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves. c. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination. d. Cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.

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8. Do the following: a. Explain the safety procedures for: 1. Using a propane or butane/propane stove 2. Using a liquid fuel stove 3. Proper storage of extra fuel b. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves. c. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination. d. Cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.

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9. Show experience in camping by doing the following: Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events. One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent. b. On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision: 1. Hike up a mountain, gaining at least 1,000 vertical feet. 2. Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles. 3. Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours. 4. Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles. 5. Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience. 6. Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more. c. Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency.

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10. Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety, survival, public health, conservation, and good citizenship. In your discussion, tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics.

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Wayne Ellis

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