Simeon Solomon & brothers - Art

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Simeon Solomon and his brothers Art:

Simeon Solomon and his brothers Art Music : Andre Rieu Author : Beatrice Vaisman

Simeon Solomon (9 October 1840 – 14 August 1905) was an English Pre-Raphaelite painter noted for his depictions of Jewish life and same-sex desire. Solomon was born into a prominent Jewish family. He was the eighth and last child born to merchant Michael (Meyer) Solomon and artist Catherine (Kate) Levy. Solomon was a younger brother to fellow painters Abraham Solomon (1824–1862) and Rebecca Solomon (1832–1886). Born and educated in London, Solomon started receiving lessons in painting from his older brother around 1850. He started attending Carey's Art Academy in 1852. His older sister first exhibited her works at the Royal Academy during the same year. As a student at the Royal Academy Schools, Solomon was introduced through Dante Gabriel Rossetti to other members of the Pre-Raphaelite circle, as well as the poet Algernon Charles Swinburne and the painter Edward Burne-Jones in 1857. His first exhibition was at the Royal Academy in 1858. He continued to hold exhibitions of his work at the Royal Academy between 1858 and 1872. In addition to the literary paintings favoured by the Pre-Raphaelite school, Solomon's subjects often included scenes from the Hebrew Bible and genre paintings depicting Jewish life and rituals. His association with Swinburne led to his illustrating Swinburne's Lesbia Brandon in 1865.:

Simeon Solomon (9 October 1840 – 14 August 1905) was an English Pre-Raphaelite painter noted for his depictions of Jewish life and same-sex desire. Solomon was born into a prominent Jewish family. He was the eighth and last child born to merchant Michael (Meyer) Solomon and artist Catherine (Kate) Levy. Solomon was a younger brother to fellow painters Abraham Solomon (1824–1862) and Rebecca Solomon (1832–1886). Born and educated in London, Solomon started receiving lessons in painting from his older brother around 1850. He started attending Carey's Art Academy in 1852. His older sister first exhibited her works at the Royal Academy during the same year. As a student at the Royal Academy Schools, Solomon was introduced through Dante Gabriel Rossetti to other members of the Pre-Raphaelite circle, as well as the poet Algernon Charles Swinburne and the painter Edward Burne-Jones in 1857. His first exhibition was at the Royal Academy in 1858. He continued to hold exhibitions of his work at the Royal Academy between 1858 and 1872. In addition to the literary paintings favoured by the Pre-Raphaelite school, Solomon's subjects often included scenes from the Hebrew Bible and genre paintings depicting Jewish life and rituals. His association with Swinburne led to his illustrating Swinburne's Lesbia Brandon in 1865.

In 1873 his career was cut short when he was arrested in a public urinal at Stratford Place Mews, off Oxford Street, in London and charged with attempting to commit sodomy: he was fined £100.He was arrested again in 1874 in Paris, after which he was sentenced to spend three months in prison. After his prosecutions he no longer exhibited, but achieved a degree of celebrity amongst those who shared his sensibilities: Oscar Wilde, John Addington Symonds, Count Eric Stenbock, and Walter Pater all collected his works. In 1884 he was admitted to the workhouse where he continued to produce work, but his life and talent were blighted by alcoholism. Twenty years later in 1905, he died from complications brought on by his alcoholism. He was buried at the Jewish Cemetery in Willesden. Examples of his work are on permanent display at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Wightwick Manor and at Leighton House. Retrospectives of his work have been held at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery in 2005–6, and in London at the Ben Uri Gallery in 2006. A photograph by David Wilkie Wynfield of Solomon in oriental costume:

In 1873 his career was cut short when he was arrested in a public urinal at Stratford Place Mews, off Oxford Street, in London and charged with attempting to commit sodomy : he was fined £100.He was arrested again in 1874 in Paris, after which he was sentenced to spend three months in prison. After his prosecutions he no longer exhibited, but achieved a degree of celebrity amongst those who shared his sensibilities: Oscar Wilde , John Addington Symonds , Count Eric Stenbock , and Walter Pater all collected his works. In 1884 he was admitted to the workhouse where he continued to produce work, but his life and talent were blighted by alcoholism . Twenty years later in 1905, he died from complications brought on by his alcoholism. He was buried at the Jewish Cemetery in Willesden . Examples of his work are on permanent display at the Victoria and Albert Museum , Wightwick Manor and at Leighton House . Retrospectives of his work have been held at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery in 2005–6, and in London at the Ben Uri Gallery in 2006. A photograph by David Wilkie Wynfield of Solomon in oriental costume

Abraham Solomon (London 7 May 1823 – 19 December 1862 Biarritz) was an English painter. (Travelling) First Class - The Meeting (revised version). The original version was in the Victorian era considered as too controversial. Born as the second son of Meyer Solomon, a Leghorn hat manufacturer, by his wife Catherine, in Sandys Street, Bishopsgate in east London. His father was one of the first Jews to be admitted to the freedom of the city of London. Two members of the family besides Abraham became artists. A younger brother, Simeon Solomon, acquired much acclaim as a Pre-Raphaelite painter and exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1858 to 1872; his later crayon drawings of idealised heads are still popular. A sister, Rebecca Solomon, exhibited domestic subjects at the Royal Academy and elsewhere between 1851 and 1875, and died on 20 November 1886. At the age of thirteen Abraham became a pupil in Sass's school of art in Bloomsbury, and in 1838 gained the Isis silver medal at the Society of Arts for a drawing from a statue. In 1839 he was admitted as a student of the Royal Academy, where he received in the same year a silver medal for drawing from the antique, and in 1843 another for drawing from the life. Solomon died in Biarritz in France, of heart disease, on 19 December 1862, the same day on which he was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy. He married, on 10 May 1860, Ella, sister of Dr. Ernest Hart; she survived her husband.:

Abraham Solomon ( London 7 May 1823 – 19 December 1862 Biarritz ) was an English painter. (Travelling) First Class - The Meeting (revised version). The original version was in the Victorian era considered as too controversial. Born as the second son of Meyer Solomon , a Leghorn hat manufacturer, by his wife Catherine, in Sandys Street, Bishopsgate in east London. His father was one of the first Jews to be admitted to the freedom of the city of London. Two members of the family besides Abraham became artists. A younger brother, Simeon Solomon , acquired much acclaim as a Pre-Raphaelite painter and exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1858 to 1872; his later crayon drawings of idealised heads are still popular. A sister, Rebecca Solomon , exhibited domestic subjects at the Royal Academy and elsewhere between 1851 and 1875, and died on 20 November 1886. At the age of thirteen Abraham became a pupil in Sass's school of art in Bloomsbury, and in 1838 gained the Isis silver medal at the Society of Arts for a drawing from a statue. In 1839 he was admitted as a student of the Royal Academy , where he received in the same year a silver medal for drawing from the antique, and in 1843 another for drawing from the life. Solomon died in Biarritz in France, of heart disease, on 19 December 1862, the same day on which he was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy. He married, on 10 May 1860, Ella, sister of Dr. Ernest Hart; she survived her husband.

Rebecca was one of eight children born into an artistically-inclined Jewish merchant family in Bishopsgate in east London. Her father was Michael (Meyer) Solomon, the first Jew to be honoured with the Freedom of the City of London and mother Catherine (Kate) Levy. Rebecca was a sister to her more famous painter brothers Simeon Solomon (1840–1905) and Abraham Solomon (1824–1862). There were five other children in the family: Aaron, Betsy, Isaac, Ellen, and Sylvester. Initially Rebecca was taught by her older brother Abraham and then took lessons at the Spitalfields School of Design. She exhibited at Royal Academy of Art between 1852 and 1868, and also at the Dudley Gallery and Gambart's French Gallery. Rebecca worked in the studio of John Everett Millais, one of founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, and the best known example of her work is a version of Millais's Christ in the House of his Parents. She also worked with the second wave Pre-Raphaelite artist, Edward Burne-Jones. As an artist in her own right, she painted works that often reflected gender and social class differences. Rebecca was also active in contemporary social reform movements and in 1859 she joined a group of thirty-eight women artists petitioning the Royal Academy of Art to open its schools to women, which led to the first woman, Laura Herford being admitted to the Academy in 1860. In 1886, Rebecca died aged 54, from injuries sustained after being run over by a hansom cab on the Euston Road in central London. :

Rebecca was one of eight children born into an artistically-inclined Jewish merchant family in Bishopsgate in east London. Her father was Michael (Meyer) Solomon , the first Jew to be honoured with the Freedom of the City of London and mother Catherine (Kate) Levy. Rebecca was a sister to her more famous painter brothers Simeon Solomon (1840–1905) and Abraham Solomon (1824–1862). There were five other children in the family: Aaron, Betsy, Isaac, Ellen, and Sylvester. Initially Rebecca was taught by her older brother Abraham and then took lessons at the Spitalfields School of Design. She exhibited at Royal Academy of Art between 1852 and 1868, and also at the Dudley Gallery and Gambart's French Gallery. Rebecca worked in the studio of John Everett Millais , one of founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood , and the best known example of her work is a version of Millais's Christ in the House of his Parents . She also worked with the second wave Pre-Raphaelite artist, Edward Burne-Jones . As an artist in her own right, she painted works that often reflected gender and social class differences. Rebecca was also active in contemporary social reform movements and in 1859 she joined a group of thirty-eight women artists petitioning the Royal Academy of Art to open its schools to women, which led to the first woman, Laura Herford being admitted to the Academy in 1860. In 1886, Rebecca died aged 54, from injuries sustained after being run over by a hansom cab on the Euston Road in central London.

Simeon & Rebecca:

Simeon & Rebecca

Simeon & Rebecca:

Simeon & Rebecca Thanks to Fabian Sharristh

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