spanish american contrast

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SPANISH-AMERICAN CONTRASTIVE ANALYSISSEE ALSO “SPANISH-AMERICAN HUMOR”AND “CISNEROS’ HUMOROUS NAMES”: 

SPANISH-AMERICAN CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS SEE ALSO 'SPANISH-AMERICAN HUMOR' AND 'CISNEROS’ HUMOROUS NAMES' by Alleen Pace Nilsen and Don L. F. Nilsen

SPAIN, FRANCE, ITALYAND PORTUGAL (Parra Guinaldo 4): 

SPAIN, FRANCE, ITALY AND PORTUGAL (Parra Guinaldo 4)

SPAIN AND PORTUGAL (Parra Guinaldo 5): 

SPAIN AND PORTUGAL (Parra Guinaldo 5)

CODE SWITCHING: 

CODE SWITCHING L. Dabène said, 'In the case of the first generation, Code Switching is often used as a remedial strategy to incompetence.' 'In the case of the second generation, code switching can fulfill different functions:'

Slide5: 

'It enables the speaker to claim his/her identity.' 'It expresses a kind of complicity with the others or, on the other hand, it reveals a strategy of divergence from the environment.' (Dabène 160)

Slide6: 

'Code Switching enables the speaker to express commentaries about the language (metalinguistic use), to comment on what has just been said (metadiscursive use), or to change the type of interaction, to select other interlocutors or to switch from a dialogue to a collective exchange (metacommunicative use).' (Dabène 160)

SPANGLISH: 

SPANGLISH 'Spanglish' is a new kind of slang finding its way not only into conversations but also into short stories, novels, popular music, comedy acts, and television sitcoms. Sprinkled through English sentences are such insertions as 'Que no?,' 'Tambien,' and 'Yo se.'

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Sometimes English words are combined with Spanish words, so that 'barber shop' and 'peluqueria' becomes 'barberia.' Similarly, 'chilling out' becomes 'chileando,' and 'to park' becomes 'parkear.' (Nilsen andamp; Nilsen 283)

HISPANIC NAMES: 

HISPANIC NAMES In Spain and Latin America, if a girl were named Ana Maria López Garcia, she has two surnames. The first one is her father’s (López), and the second one is her mother’s (Garcia). (Bengoa 3)

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If Ana Maria López Garcia married Gregoria Díaz Rodriguez, then she would write her name as Ana Maria López de Díaz. In Mexico, Ana Maria López de Díaz would go by her maiden name daily (Maria López Garcia), but on formal documentation she would identify herself with her married name (Ana Maria López de Díaz). (Bengoa 3-4)

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If she were to have a child, Alicia, Alicia’s full name would be Alicia López Díaz, keeping both her father’s and her mother’s surnames (Bengoa 3).

SPANGLISH TEST 1: 

SPANGLISH TEST 1 bacuncliner vacuum cleaner biper beeper or pager boyla boiler chileando chilling out choping shopping fafu fast food jangear hanging out joldoperos muggers, holdup artists

SPANGLISH TEST 2: 

SPANGLISH TEST 2 liqueo to leak maicrogüey microwave oven pulover T-shirt roofo roof sangüiche sandwich tensén ten-cent store like K-Mart or Woolworths --Alvarez 487

Phonological Differences 1: 

Phonological Differences 1 English has 13 vowels; Spanish has only 5 vowels Spanish is a syllable-timed language; English is a stress-timed language Spanish /d/ and /ð/ are alaphonic as in 'duda' 

Phonological Differences 2: 

Phonological Differences 2 English has a retroflex /r/; Spanish has a flapped /r/ and a trilled /r/ written as andlt;randgt; and andlt;rrandgt; English has no velar fricative andlt;xandgt; or andlt;jandgt; Spanish doesn’t distinguish between /č/ and /š/, or between /s/ and /z/

Orthographic Differences 1: 

Orthographic Differences 1 Spanish andlt;llandgt; is pronounced /y/; Spanish andlt;landgt; is pronounced /l/ Spanish andlt;jandgt; is a velar fricative Spanish andlt;bandgt; and andlt;vandgt; are both the same (bilabial fricatives) Spanish has andlt;ñandgt; for the /ny/ sound Spanish andlt;handgt; is not pronounced Spanish has a andlt;qandgt; but no andlt;kandgt; or andlt;candgt;

Orthographic Differences 2: 

Orthographic Differences 2 Spanish begins questions with andlt;¿andgt; and exclamations with andlt;iandgt; Spanish uses a period for thousands, and a comma for a decimal; English does the reverse Spanish uses «…» for quotation marks, not '…'

Morphological Differences : 

Morphological Differences Spanish verbs are more highly inflected than are English verbs Spanish adjectives agree with the nouns they modify in number and gender Spanish has grammatical gender; English has natural gender Spanish uses the definite article differently as in 'el señor Jones'

Name Differences: 

Name Differences In Spain and Latin America, if a girl were named Ana Maria López Garcia, she has two surnames. The first one is her father’s (López), and the second one is her mother’s (Garcia). (Bengoa 3)

Slide20: 

If Ana Maria López Garcia married Gregorio Díaz Rodriguez, then she would write her name as Ana Maria López de Díaz. In Mexico, Ana Maria López de Díaz would go by her maiden name daily (Maria López Garcia), but on formal documentation she would identify herself with her married name (Ana Maria López de Díaz). (Bengoa 3-4)

Slide21: 

If she were to have a child, Alicia, Alicia’s full name would be Alicia López Díaz, keeping both her father’s and her mother’s surnames. (Bengoa 3).

Syntactic Differences: 

Syntactic Differences English adjectives come before nouns; Spanish adjectives come after nouns Spanish has 'pro-drop' which means that a subject pronoun can be dropped; English does not Spanish has double negatives ('No tiene nada'); English does not

Semantic Differences 1: 

Semantic Differences 1 Some English-Spanish cognates don’t have the same meaning Consider the following Spanish words: 'actual,' 'libraria,' 'grocería,' 'molestar,' 'embarazada' and 'principio' In English, these words mean 'present,' 'bookstore,' 'vulgarity,' 'to bother,' 'pregnant' and 'beginning,' respectively

Semantic Differences 2: 

Semantic Differences 2 A single Spanish word can have more than one English meaning: Spanish 'hacer' means either 'make' or 'do' Spanish 'su' means either 'his,' 'her,' or 'its' Spanish 'en' means either 'on,' 'in,' 'into,' or 'at'

Semantic Differences 3: 

Semantic Differences 3 Or, a single English word can have more than one Spanish meaning: English 'time' in Spanish can be 'tiempo,' 'vez,' or 'hora' English 'hot' in Spanish can be 'picante,' or 'caliente'

In conclusion, consider these riddles:: 

In conclusion, consider these riddles: Spanish 'plata' means 'silver,' Spanish 'oro' means 'gold,' and Spanish 'platano' means 'banana' Qué es come oro, pero plata no es? Platano es.

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!Spanish 'se parecen' means 'similarity' Spanish 'manzano' means 'apple' Spanish 'tren' means 'train' Spanish 'pera' means 'pear' Spanish 'espera' means 'to wait' En qué se parecen una manzano y un tren? No es pera. = No espera.

Slide28: 

!!Spanish 'estrellas' means 'stars' Spanish 'hay' means 'are there' Spanish 'cielos' means 'heavens' Spanish 'cinquenta' means 'fifty' Spanish 'sin quenta' means 'countless Cuantas estrellas hay en los cielos? Cinquenta. = Sin quenta

Slide29: 

!!!Spanish 'perezoso' means 'lazy' Spanish 'mundo' means 'world' Spanish 'nada' means both 'nothing' and 'it swims' Cual animal es el mas perezoso del mundo? El pez. Qué hace el pez? Nada.

Slide30: 

References # 1: Agosín, Marjorie. 'Always Living in Spanish' (Eschholz 116-118). Ahern, Maureen V., and Don L. F. Nilsen. 'A Comparison of Animal Dead Metaphors in English and Spanish Speech.' The Bilingual Review/La Revista Bilingue 3.2 (1976): 163-175. Alvarez, Lizette Alvarez. 'It’s the Talk of Nueva York: The Hybrid called Spanglish' (Clark, 483-488). Ardila, Alfredo. 'Spanglish: An Anglicized Spanish Dialect.' Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 27.1 (2005): 60-81. Bausa, Vanessa. 'Internet Spanglish' (Eschholz 517-519).

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References # 2: Bengoa, Sharon. 'Phenomena Born from Languages in Contact: Spanglish and Chicano English.' Tempe, AZ: ASU LIN 515 Paper, April 25, 2006. Clark, Virginia, Paul Eschholz, and Alfred Rosa. Language: Readings in Language and Culture, 6th Edition. New York, NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Dabène, L. 'Le Parler Bilingue Issus de l’Immigration en France.' in Jacobson, 159-168. Eschholz, Paul, Alfred Rosa, and Virginia Clark, eds. Language Awareness: Readings for College Writers, Ninth Edition. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005. Fromkin, Victoria, Robert Rodman, and Nina Hyams. An Introduction to Language, 8th Edition. Boston, MA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2007. Jacobson, R., ed. Codeswitching as a World Phenomenon. New York, NY: Peter Lang, 1990.

Slide32: 

References # 3: Nilsen, Don L. F. 'False Cognates in English and Spanish.' in Studies in Descriptive and Historical Linguistics. Ed. Paul J. Hopper. Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins, 1977, 174-185. Nilsen, Alleen Pace, and Don L. F. Nilsen. Encyclopedia of 20th Century American Humor. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2000. Parra Guinaldo, Victor. The Development of the Latin Initial F- in Old Spanish. PowerPoint Presentation. Tempe, AZ: A.S.U., April, 2006. Rodriguez, González F. Spanish Loanwords in the English Language: A Tendency towards Hegemony Reversal. New York, NY: Mouton de Gruyter, 1996. Stavans, Ilan. Spanglish: The Making of a New American Language. New York, NY: First Rayo/HarperCollins, 2003.

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