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Web Based InstructionSeminar 4 : 

Web Based Instruction Seminar 4 Randy Hansen Information Technology Coordinator Prince George's County Public Schools rhansen@pgcps.org Philip Held Technology Coordinator Kingsford Elementary School Prince George's County Public Schools pheld@pgcps.org

Warm Up: 

Warm Up Read the scenario below. A teacher in Hansen County wishes to use the new 'Harry Potter' book in her class. She can’t afford 54 copies of the book for all her students. The teacher legally purchases one copy of the book for herself. Then, she copies 6 of the 15 chapters of the book; including chapters 1 andamp; 2 to introduce the book, chapters 5 andamp; 6 to fill in the middle, and chapters 13 andamp; 14 for the conclusion of the story. Is this copyright infringement?

Resource: 

Resource Top 10 Misconceptions about Copyright http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html

Current Law (basic): 

Current Law (basic) Works published before 1978 that did not contain a valid copyright notice may be considered to be in the public domain. (Works published after 1978 do not need to have a copyright notice to be under copyright protection.) Works created 1978 or later - After 1978 - A work is copyright protected from the moment it is created, whether a copyright notice appears on it or not. Most people place copyright notices on their works, as there are advantages to doing so. But don't assume that a work is in the public domain if there is no notice on it. Research carefully. After 1978 - A work is in the public domain only if the creator places a notice on it that he/she is placing it in the public domain. If this notice isn't there, then assume that the work is under copyright protection. On works created after 1978, copyright protection lasts for author's/designer's lifetime plus an additional 70 years after author's/designer's death. Copyright: About.com

WHAT IS COPYRIGHT*definitions from the U.S. Copyright Office: 

WHAT IS COPYRIGHT *definitions from the U.S. Copyright Office Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States (title 17, U.S. Code) to the authors of 'original works of authorship,' including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. Section 106 of the 1976 Copyright Act generally gives the owner of copyright the exclusive right to do and to authorize others to do the following: To reproduce the work in copies or phonorecords; To prepare derivative works based upon the work; To distribute copies or phonorecords of the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending; To perform the work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and motion pictures and other audiovisual works; To display the copyrighted work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and pictorial, graphic, or sculptural works, including the individual images of a motion picture or other audiovisual work; and In the case of sound recordings, to perform the work publicly by means of a digital audio transmission.

Copyright vs. Fair Use* By: Chris DalzielExecutive DirectorInstructional Telecomunications Council: 

Copyright vs. Fair Use * By: Chris Dalziel Executive Director Instructional Telecomunications Council According to the Copyright Act of 1976, copyright owners have the exclusive right to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute, transfer ownership, rent, lend, perform or display their creations. Fair use places a limit on these exclusive rights to promote free speech, learning, scholarly research and open discussion in accordance with the First Amendment. Educators must prove four conditions or 'factors' exist to legally use portions of copyrighted material.

Exceptions for Teachers* By: Chris DalzielExecutive DirectorInstructional Telecomunications Council: 

Exceptions for Teachers * By: Chris Dalziel Executive Director Instructional Telecomunications Council 4 Conditions for educators to legally use copyrighted material: *First, the 'purpose and character of the use' must be educational in nature. *Second, the work should be published, since an author generally will not publish a creation if he or she wants to keep it from the public eye. Courts also favor nonfiction for fair use over fiction. *Third, the copied material must be an excerpt or 'portion' of the whole and not a 'substantial' part of the work -- even a small portion could be substantial if it constitutes a central or critical part of the original work. *Fourth, the teacher must consider the 'effect of the use of the work.' This fourth factor, in which the Supreme Court has said the use cannot impair the marketability of the work, is probably the most difficult to determine and the most controversial in a fair use analysis.

Copyright Infringement?: 

Copyright Infringement? A teacher in Hansen County wishes to use the new 'Harry Potter' book in her class. She can’t afford 54 copies of the book for all her students. The teacher legally purchases one copy of the book for herself. Then, she copies 6 of the 15 chapters of the book; including chapters 1 andamp; 2 to introduce the book, chapters 5 andamp; 6 to fill in the middle, and chapters 13 andamp; 14 for the conclusion of the story. Based on Fair Use in Education, is this copyright infringement?

Fair Use Checklist: 

Fair Use Checklist Designed by the Management Center at Indiana University Check out the 'fair use' checklist to see if you can use copyrighted materials http://html.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.iupui.edu/%7Ecopyinfo/online%5Ftutorial.html

Copyright in Use: 

Copyright in Use Copyright and the World Wide Web http://www.benedict.com/digital/www/webiss.htm#Top Complete Article on Fair Use by Educators http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/fairuse/dalziel.html http://www.lib.utsystem.edu/copyright/texthome.html Linking and Liability – linking to other resources http://www.bitlaw.com/internet/linking.html

Additional Resources: 

Additional Resources U.S. copyright Office http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright/circs/circ1.html Top 10 Misconceptions about Copyright http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html http://www.pitt.edu/~skvarka/education/copyright/ (related article) International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions http://www.ifla.org/II/cpyright.htm The Copyright Page http://crochet.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.benedict.com/

FTP Software: 

FTP Software WS-FTP Security Open connection Transfer data www.tucows.com

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